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The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1864., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 5 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 15: (search)
then in the chair. In the Senate there was Senator Thomas Bayard of Delaware, whose greatest pride was that he was a descendant of a long line of eminent statesmen. Senator Beck of Kentucky, that sturdy Scotchman who was never troubled by the Presidential bee because he was born in Scotland and thus disqualified for occupying the executive mansion, was one of the noblest and bravest men of the Senate, and his friendship was never bounded by the narrow limitations of partisanship. George H. Pendleton, of Ohio, the perfect opposite of his colleague, John Sherman, was a most ambitious man, and his elaborate manner was such that he had been given the cognomen of Gentleman George. He was very polished in his manner, but never particularly forceful. The able Senator Pinkney Whyte of Maryland was in the Senate at this time. Cockrell of Missouri was a fine lawyer who, while having one of the bravest records among the officers of the Confederacy in the Senate, rarely boasted of it befo
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
the whole parade moved with clockwork precision. Garfield was escorted by Senators Bayard and Anthony with the Columbia Commandery Knights Templar, of which he was a member, as a guard of honor. Vice-President-elect Arthur was escorted by Senator Pendleton. At the Senate chamber Mrs. Hayes and General Garfield's wife and mother were conducted to reserved gallery seats. Mrs. Hayes wore a sealskin coat and a black brocaded silk dress. Mother Garfield wore black silk trimmed with silver-fox festing young women, who have since made marriages befitting their station. Finally the day arrived for the delivery of the proclamation, or rather coronation address, of Emperor Wilhelm II in the throne-room of the Emperor's palace. Mr. George H. Pendleton, the American minister to Germany (it was before we had ambassadors) caused tickets to the gallery to be sent us, and the second secretary, Mr. Crosby, did us the honor to escort us to our seats. It was an imposing spectacle and one ne
vention if the war Democrats had had the courage of their convictions; but they were so intent upon the nomination of McClellan, that they considered the platform of secondary importance, and the fatal resolutions were adopted without debate. Mr. Vallandigham, having thus taken possession of the convention, next adopted the candidate, and put the seal of his sinister approval on General McClellan by moving that his nomination be made unanimous, which was done amid great cheering. George H. Pendleton was nominated for Vice-President, and the convention adjourned — not sine die, as is customary, but subject to be called at any time and place the executive national committee shall designate. The motives of this action were not avowed, but it was taken as a significant warning that the leaders of the Democratic party held themselves ready for any extraordinary measures which the exigencies of the time might provoke or invite. The New-Yorkers, however, had the last word, for Gov
Let the thing be pressed. In fact, after nightfall of the sixth, Lee's army could only flutter like a wounded bird with one wing shattered. There was no longer any possibility of escape; but Lee found it hard to relinquish the illusion of years, and as soon as night came down he again began his weary march westward. A slight success on the next day once more raised his hopes; but his optimism was not shared by his subordinates, and a number of his principal officers, selecting General Pendleton as their spokesman, made known to him on the seventh their belief that further resistance was useless, and advised surrender. Lee told them that they had yet too many men to think of laying down their arms, but in answer to a courteous summons from Grant sent that same day, inquired what terms he would be willing to offer. Without waiting for a reply, he again put his men in motion, and during all of the eighth the chase and pursuit continued through a part of Virginia green with spr
Second District. J. W. White, Sixteenth District. James R. Morris, Fifteenth District. George S. Converse, Seventh District Warren P. Noble, Ninth District. George H. Pendleton, First District. W. A. Hutchins, Eleventh District. Abner L. Backus, Tenth District. J. F. Mckinney, Fourth District. F. C. Le Blond, Fifth District. Louis 1885. Messr's. M. Birchard, David A. Houck, George Bliss. T. W. Bartley, W. J. Gordon, John O'Neill, C. A. White, V. E. Finck, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. Converse, Warren P. Noble, James R. Morris, W. A Hutchins, Abner L. Backus, J. F. McKinney, P. C. Le Blond, Louis Schaffer. gentlemen: The reshite, Sixth District. W. E. Finck, Twelfth District. Alexander long, Second District. Jas. R. Morris, Fifteenth District. Geo. S. Converse, Seventh District. Geo. H. Pendleton, First District. W. A. Hutchins, Eleventh District. A. L. Backus, Tenth District. J. F. Mckinney, Fourth District. J. W. White, Sixteenth District. F. C. Le
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
growth of his army in numbers. In the space of three months Stonewall Jackson's corps alone increased from twenty-five thousand to thirty-three thousand men. The Battle-fields of Virginia, volume I.: Chancellorsville, by Captain Jed. Hotchkiss and Lieutenant-Colonel William Allan (officers of Lee's army), page 14. This work contains carefully constructed maps, illustrative of the historical narrative. Lee consolidated his artillery into one corps, and placed it under the command of General Pendleton, as chief. He also gave a similar organization to his cavalry. When April came, Lee found himself at the head of an army unsurpassed in discipline, and full of enthusiasm; yet it was divided, for, so early as February, he had sent Longstreet with two divisions to operate against General J. J. Peck in the vicinity of Suffolk, on the south side of the James River, and other troops were raiding with Imboden in West Virginia. Yet he felt strong, with only about half the number, of troop
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
t he should continue to do so much as might seem to be required by the public safety. The Democratic Convention that assembled June 11, 1863. at Columbus, Ohio, and nominated Vallandigham for the chief magistracy of the State, See page 84. also. denounced the Government, and sent a committee The following are the names of the Committee: M. Burchard, David A. Houck, George Bliss, T. W. Bartley, W. J. Gordon, John O'Neill, C. A. White, W. A. Fink, Alexander Long, J. W. White, George H. Pendleton, George L. Converse, Hanzo P. Noble, James R. Morris, W. A. Hutchins, Abner L. Backus, J. F. MceKenney, P. C. DeBlond, Louis Schaefer. to the President to demand a revocation of the sentence of their candidate, not as a favor, but as a right. They assumed to speak for a majority of the, people of Ohio. The President's reply June 29. was brief and pointed. He defended the action of the Government, and, after telling them plainly that their own attitude in the matter encouraged dese
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
ll, Ben. Wood, Fernando Wood, Elijah Ward, J. W. Chanler, James Brooks, Anson Herrick, William Radford, Charles H. Winfield, Homer A. Nelson, John B. Steele, John V. L. Pruyn, John A. Griswold, Orlando Kellogg, Calvin T. Hulburd, James M. Marvin, Samuel F. Miller, Ambrose W. Clark, Francis Kernan, De Witt C. Littlejohn, Thomas T. Davis, Theodore M. Pomeroy, Daniel Morris, Giles W. Hotchkiss, R. B. Van Valkenburg, Freeman Clarke, Augustus Frank, John B. Ganson, Reuben E. Fenton. Ohio.--George H. Pendleton, Alexander Long, Robert C. Schenck, J. F. McKinney, Frank C. Le Blond, Chilton A. White, Samuel S. Cox, William Johnson, Warren P. Noble, James M. Ashley, Wells A. Hutchins, William E. Finck, John O'Neill, George Bliss, James R. Morris, Joseph W. White, Ephraim R. Eckley, Rufus P Spaulding, J. A. Garfield. Oregon.--John R. McBride. Pennsylvania.--Samuel J. Randall, Charles O'Neill, Leonard Myers, William P. Kelley, M. Russell Thayer, John D. Stiles, John M. Broomall, S. E. Ancona, Tha
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
all the care and protection, regard and kindness, that they deserved. Then General George B. McClellan, who had been relieved of military command about twenty-one months before, Nov. 5, 1862 was nominated for the office of President, and George H. Pendleton, of Ohio, for Vice-President. The latter, in Congress and out of it, had been, next to Vallandigham, one of the most outspoken of the opponents of the war. The Convention soon afterward adjourned, but did not dissolve. Mr. Wickliffe, o New Jersey--Perry, Steele; Pennsylvania--Ancona, Dawson, Denison, Johnson, Miller, Randall, Styles, Strause; Maryland--Harris; Kentucky--Clay, Grider, Harding, Malloy, Wadsworth; Ohio--Bliss, Cox, Finck, Johnson, Long, Morris, Noble, O'Neill. Pendleton, C. A. White, J. W. White; Indiana--Cravens, Edgerton, Harrington, Holman, Law; Illinois--J. C. Allen, W. T. Allen; Edw. Harris; Wisconsin--Brown, Eldridge; Missouri--Hall, Scott.--56. Eight Democrats did not vote, namely, Lazear, Pennsylvania;
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
able men, had produced wide-spread discontent, and there was bold talk in and out of the Congress, of making General Lee dictator, thereby stripping the Arch-Conspirator of power. To avoid this humiliation, Davis consented to allow the Congress to appoint Lee General-in-chief of all the armies of the Confederacy. This was done on the first of February, 1865. The same influence caused the reappointment of General Johnston, to the command of the troops opposing Sherman. by the hand of General Pendleton. Lee refused to listen favorably to the opinions of his officers, and professed not to then. see the, necessity for a surrender. Davis, his colleague, was then at Danville, trying to reorganize the Government; and they seem to have agreed to continue the contest so long as there was a man left in the Confederacy. The remains of Lee's army were now in a compact mass on the stage and plank roads to Lynchburg, a few miles north of Farmville, with strong intrenchments covering these
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