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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 19 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 5 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
eft, and begin the attack there, following up, as near as possible, the direction of the Emmetsburg road. My corps occupied our right, with Hood on the extreme right, and McLaws next. Hill's Corps was next to mine, in front of the Federal centre, and Ewell was on our extreme left. My corps, with Pickett's Division absent, numbered hardly thirteen thousand men. I realized that the fight was to be a fearful one; but being assured that my flank would be protected by the brigades of Wilcox, Perry, Wright, Posey, and Mahone, moving en echelon, and that Ewell was to co-operate by a direct attack on the enemy's right, and Hill to threaten his centre, and attack if opportunity offered, and thus prevent reinforcements from being launched either against myself or Ewell, it seemed possible that we might possibly dislodge the great army in front of us. At half-past 3 o'clock the order was given General Hood to advance upon the enemy, and, hurrying to the head of McLaws' Division, I moved wit
rn men was a reality. I often wondered upon what they fed that they should be so boastful; my heart, meanwhile, praying that, should the conflict ever come, Heaven might protect the Union and give to its defenders strength to save it from dismemberment. Impatient to secure a presentable wardrobe, and disliking to take up my husband's time, or that of Mrs. Brown, to accompany me on a shopping tour, one morning I started out alone. It was easy enough to wander down Pennsylvania Avenue to Perry's and John T. Mitchell's dry-goods stores, and to find all I dared purchase with my limited purse. Feeling that I had achieved wonders, I started to return to the hotel; but, after walking quite a distance and looking about carefully for landmarks and failing to find one, I went to the corner of Seventh and C Streets, the old carriage stand, got into one of the vehicles and told the driver to take me to Brown's Hotel. Turning around the corner he halted at the ladies' entrance half a block
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
p the enemy's left and begin the attack there, following up as near as possible the direction of the Emmetsburg road. My corps occupied our right, with Hood on our extreme right and McLaws next. Hill's corps was next to mine, in front of the Federal centre, and Ewell was on our extreme left. My corps, with Pickett's division absent, numbered hardly 13,000 men. I realized that the fight was to be a fearful one; but being assured that my flank would be protected by the brigades of Wilcox, Perry, Wright, Posey, and Mahone moving en echelon, and that Ewell was to co-operate by a direct attack on the enemy's right, and Hill to threaten his centre and attack if opportunity offered and thus prevent reinforcements from being launched either against myself or Ewell, it seemed that we might possibly dislodge the great army in front of us. At half-past 3 o'clock the order was given General Hood to advance upon the enemy, and, hurrying to the head of McLaw's divison, I moved with his line.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
cox's division commander, says: A strong fire was poured upon our right flank, which had become detached from McLaws' left. This testimony is corroborated by General McLaws, the division commander on his right, and by General Humphries, the brigade commander on his right. It is a plain case. General Wilcox was given the directing brigade and ordered to cover McLaws' left flank. He failed to do this. There is no doubt that he and his. troops fought gallantly, as did those of Wright's and Perry's brigades. Their courage was splendid; but, misguided by the brigade of direction, under General Wilcox, their work was not as effective as it should have been. In this connection it may be noted that the Federal line in front of these troops was not broken so much by direct assault as by crushing in the lines on their left. General Humphreys was forced to change front partially two or three times to meet threatened flank movements against him, and he was in that way drawn off from imm
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Perry's rebel brigade at the battle of Gettysburgh. (search)
Perry's rebel brigade at the battle of Gettysburgh. The following is a copy of a communication addressed to the editors of the Richmond Enquirer in relation to the conduct of Perry's brigade at the battle of Gettysburgh, which we cheerfully lay before our readers as an act of justice to the brave men of Colonel Long's commaof the Savannah Republican, I omitted to take notice of the following sentence: Perry's brigade advanced a short distance, but did not become fully engaged. This is quite as incorrect as the other statements which I have contradicted. Perry's brigade, under the command of Colonel David Long, advanced as bravely, as perseverirrespondent, unintentionally, had fallen into, in relation to the part borne by Perry's brigade in the Gettysburgh fight. The letter will speak for itself: headquanth ult., and published in your issue of the twenty-third, as to the conduct of Perry's brigade in the charge upon the enemy's lines at Gettysburgh on the second of
would or could be really, conclusively effected. Thousands died fighting under the flag of treason whose hearts yearned toward the old banner, and whose aspiration for an ocean-bound republic --one which should be felt and respected as first among nations — could not be quenched even in their own life-blood. And, on the other hand, the flag rendered illustrious by the triumphs of Gates and Greene and Washington — of Harrison, Brown, Scott, Macomb, and Jackson — of Truxtun, Decatur, Hull, Perry, Porter, and McDonough — was throughout a tower of strength to the Unionists. In the hours darkened by shameful defeat and needless disaster, when the Republic seemed rocking and reeling on the very brink of destruction — when Europe almost unanimously pronounced the Union irretrievably lost, and condemned the infatuation that demanded persistence in an utterly hopeless contest — the heart of the loyal Millions never faltered, nor was their faith shaken that, in spite of present rever
different brigades: On the extreme right of Anderson's division connecting with McLaws's left, was Wilcox's brigade, then Perry's, Wright's, Posey's, and Mahone's. At half-past 5 o'clock, Longstreet commenced the attack, and Wilcox followed it up by promptly moving forward; Perry's brigade quickly followed, and Wright moved simultaneously with him. The two divisions of Longstreet's corps soon encountered the enemy posted a little in rear of the Emmitsburg turnpike, which winds along the slope rms, in plain view of a terrible battle, witnessing the mighty efforts of two little brigades (Wright's and Wilcox's; for Perry had fallen back overpowered), contending with the heavy masses of Yankee infantry, and subjected to a most deadly fire fr's heavy artillery, without a single effort to aid them in the assault, or to assist them when the heights were carried. Perry's brigade, which was between Wilcox and Wright, soon after its first advance, was pressed so heavily as to be forced to r
higan--A. C. Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, F. W. Kellogg, Longyear, Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Donnelly, Windom. Kansas--Wilder. Oregon--McBride. Nevada--Worthington. California--Cole, Higby, Shannon.--Total, 119. Nays--[All Democrats.] Maine--Sweat. New York — Brooks, Chanler, Kalbfleisch, Kernan, Pruyn, Townsend, Ward, Winfield, Ben. Wood, Fernando Wood. New Jersey--Perry, W. G. Steele. Pennsylvania--Ancona, Dawson, Dennison, P. Johnson, W. H. Miller, S. J. Randall, Stiles, Strouse. Maryland--B. G. Harris. Kentucky--Clay, Grider, Harding, Mallory, Wadsworth. Ohio — Bliss, Cox, Finck, Wm. Johnson, Long, J. R. Morris, Noble, J. O'Neill, Pendleton, C. A. White, J. W. White. Indiana--Cravens, Edgerton, Harrington, Holman, Law. Illinois--J. C. Allen, W. J. Allen, Eden, C. M. Harris, Knapp, Morrison, Robinson, Ross, Stuart. Wisconsin--J. S. Brown<
O. P. Morton governed one Great State of this great nation, So it did. Magoffin governed old Kentuck, And Dennison Ohio; And no three humans had more pluck Than this puissant trio, So they hadn't. Magoffin was the leading man: He telegraphed to Perry, And writ, by post, to Dennison, To meet him in a hurry, So he did. And Dennison and Morton, too, Believed they had good reason To fear Magoffin sought to do Some hellish act of treason, So they did. But they concluded it was best To do as he dem their traps, And off they went a-puffina, So they did. Magoffin 4 A. M. did fix, By post and by the wire; But when the hour had come — why nix Comehraus was he — Beriah, So he was. And then, could you have heard them swear! Them chaps along with Perry: They cussed, and stamped, and pulled their hair, For they were angry-very, So they were. And when they found that they were sold, And saw no chance for fighting, They took a train that they controlled, And home they went a-kiting, So they did. A
ame On many a sea and shore, sire; Secession won't eclipse his fame-- He'll only do it more, sirs! Now Dixie's Land is in ferment With their Yancey and their Cobb, sirs; They're plunging in, on ruin bent, And raising the very hob, sirs. Yankee Doodle hears the noise-- The American eagle flutters; He says, “Now just be quiet, boys-- Deuce take the one that mutters.” Yankee Doodle is the boy Will make 'em stop their treason, If they will only hold their jaw, And hear a little reason. Have we forgot our country's flag, And all her natal glory, To palm it off for a dirty rag, Unknown in song or story? Your rattlesnakes and pelicans Are not the kind of bunting That Perry and Decatur bore, When pirates they were hunting. So tear your traitorous ensigns down, Run up the Stars and Stripes, sirs, Or Uncle Sam will feed you lead, Until you have the gripes, sirs! The eagle is too wise a fowl To fool with all your pranks, sirs; Fort Pickens you must leave alone, Or thin your rebel ranks, si
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