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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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pled with humiliation, because it was the result of a notice to retaliate as fully as might need be to stop such a barbarous practice. To yield to the notice thus served was a practical admission by the United States government that the Confederacy had become a power among the nations. On June 3, 1861, the little schooner Savannah, previously a pilot boat in Charleston harbor and sailing under a commission issued by authority of the Confederate States, was captured by the United States brig Perry. The crew was placed in irons and sent to New York. It appeared, from statements made without contradiction, that they were not treated as prisoners of war, whereupon a letter was addressed by me to President Lincoln, dated July 6th, stating explicitly that, painful as will be the necessity, this Government will deal out to the prisoners held by it the same treatment and the same fate as shall be experienced by those captured on the Savannah; and, if driven to the terrible necessity of re
h Gen. J. E. Johnston, 340-41. Extracts from report on siege of Vicksburg, 348-49. Pender, General, 268, 273, 286, 377. Pendleton, Gen. W. N., 111, 126, 130, 131, 371-72, 461. Extract from address on first battle of Gettysburg, 371. Perry, Benjamin F., 625. Perry (brig), 9. Perryville, Ky., Battle of, 324. Petersburg, Va., siege of, 541-47, 549-56. Petrel (ship), 212. Pettigrew, General, 131. Pettus, Col. E. W., 336, 347. Phelps, Gen. 499, 500. Pierce, Franklin, Pres. U. Perry (brig), 9. Perryville, Ky., Battle of, 324. Petersburg, Va., siege of, 541-47, 549-56. Petrel (ship), 212. Pettigrew, General, 131. Pettus, Col. E. W., 336, 347. Phelps, Gen. 499, 500. Pierce, Franklin, Pres. U. S., 227-28. Pierpont, Francis H., 256, 257, 258, 612. Pierrepont, Edwards, 406. Pickett, General, 131, 296, 309, 373, 441, 561. Pillow, General, 24, 25, 26, 27-28, 32, 34, 35,496. Piracy. Term applied to Confederate naval operations, 9-10. English discussion of Lincoln's piracy proclamation, 10. Pitcairn, Major, 514. Pittsburg (gunboat), 25. Pittsburg Landing, 39, 41-42, 58. Battle, 43. Pleasant Hill, Battle of, 457. Poindexter, Doctor. 122. Point Comfort, 7 Polignac, Gener
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 (search)
Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 Naval officer; born in Charleston, S. C., Feb. 22, 1795; original name Holdup, Stevens being added by legislative enactment in 1815. He entered the United States navy in 1808, and was made lieutenant in July, 1813. In 1812 he volunteered for lake service, and in December he was severely wounded by a canistershot through his hand while storming a battery at Black Rock, near Buffalo. In the summer of 1813 he superintended the fitting and rigging of Perry's fleet at Erie, and in the battle, Sept. 10, he commanded the sloop Trippe, behaving gallantly. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 22, 1841. Naval officer; born in Middletown, Conn., May 27, 1819; son of the preceding; entered the navy in 1836; was active in operations on the Southern coast, and in movements against Mobile in the Civil War. He was specially distinguished in operations against Forts Wagner and Sumter in 1863, and in the capture of the Confederate fleet and of Fort Morga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tanner, Benjamin 1775-1848 (search)
Tanner, Benjamin 1775-1848 Engraver; born in New York City, March 27, 1775; removed to Philadelphia, Pa., in 1799, and with his brother Henry founded a map-publishing establishment. He also founded the banknote engraving house of Tanner, Vallance. Kearny & Co., in 1816. Later this enterprise was abandoned and he founded a blank-check-note and draft publishing concern. His engravings include Apotheosis of Washington; Perry's victory on Lake Erie, Sept. 10, 1813; The launch of the steam frigate Fulton; MacDONOUGHonough's victory on Lake Champlain, and defeat of the British army at Plattsburg by General McCoomb, Sept. 11, 1814; The surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown; America guided by wisdom, etc. He died in Baltimore, Md., Nov. 14, 1848.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tatnall, Josiah -1871 (search)
Tatnall, Josiah -1871 Naval officer; born near Savannah, Ga., Nov. 9, 1796; entered the United States navy in 1812; rose to captain in 1850; first served in the frigate Constellation, and assisted in the repulse of the British at Craney Island in 1813. He afterwards served under Perry and Porter, and was engaged on the Mexican coast during the war against Mexico. He entered the Confederate service; improvised a flotilla known as the Mosquito Fleet, and attempted to defend Port Royal Sound against Dupont. He commanded at Norfolk when the Merrimac was destroyed, and the Mosquito Fleet at Savannah. He died in Savannah, Ga., June 14, 1871.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taylor, William Vigeron 1781-1858 (search)
Taylor, William Vigeron 1781-1858 Naval officer; born in Newport, R. I., in 1781; having been for some time in the merchantmarine service, was appointed sailingmaster in the navy in April, 1813, and ably assisted in fitting out Perry's fleet at Erie. He navigated Perry's flag-ship (Lawrence) into and during the battle. His last service was on a cruise in the Pacific, in command of the Ohio, seventy-four guns, in 1847. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 11, 1858. Taylor, Zachary Taylor, William Vigeron 1781-1858 Naval officer; born in Newport, R. I., in 1781; having been for some time in the merchantmarine service, was appointed sailingmaster in the navy in April, 1813, and ably assisted in fitting out Perry's fleet at Erie. He navigated Perry's flag-ship (Lawrence) into and during the battle. His last service was on a cruise in the Pacific, in command of the Ohio, seventy-four guns, in 1847. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 11, 1858. Taylor, Zachary
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thames, battle of the (search)
unteer aide. Learning that some small vessels containing the enemy's artillery and baggage were escaping on Lake St. Clair towards the mouth of the Thames, Commodore Perry despatched a portion of his fleet, under Captain Elliott, in pursuit. Perry soon followed in the Ariel, accompanied by the Caledonia. The little squadron rePerry soon followed in the Ariel, accompanied by the Caledonia. The little squadron reached (Oct. 2 ) the mouth of the Thames, with the baggage, provisions, and ammunition wagons of the Americans, but the vessels of the enemy had escaped up that stream. Harrison pressed forward rapidly, along the border of the lake and Appearance of the Thames battle-ground in 1860. up the Thames. Three of Perry's armed vesselPerry's armed vessels also went up the river as convoys to transports. The British had encamped at Dolsen's—700 white men and 1,200 Indians—but on the approach of Harrison they continued their flight, Tecumseh cursing Proctor for his cowardice. The former boasted of the victory he should win, but kept on retreating, destroying bridges and other prop
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
arged......July 2, 1875 Andrew Johnson, born 1808, dies near Jonesboro, Tenn......July 31, 1875 Hon. Horace Binney, born 1780, graduate of Harvard, 1797, and oldest member of Philadelphia bar, dies at Philadelphia......Aug. 12, 1875 Commodore Perry's flag-ship, the Lawrence, sunk for preservation in Misery Bay, Lake Erie, in July, 1815, is raised for transportation to the Centennial Exposition......Sept. 14, 1875 Democratic conventions of New York declare for specie resumption......William H. Taft appointed first governor......June 21, 1901 General Chaffee appointed military governor in place of General MacArthur......June 22, 1901 Turkey settles the United States indemnity claims......July 2, 1901 Monument of Commodore Perry unveiled in Japan......July 14, 1901 William H. Hunt chosen successor to Governor Allen of Porto Rico......July 23, 1901 Porto Rico adopts resolution providing for free-trade with the United States on the anniversary of the American oc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Carolina, (search)
khatchie, Feb. 3; Willston Station, Feb. 8; Orangeburg, Feb. 12; Congaree Creek......Feb. 15, 1865 Columbia surrendered to General Sherman......Feb. 17, 1865 Charleston, burned and evacuated by General Hardee the day previous, is occupied by Federal troops......Feb. 18, 1865 Gen. O. O. Howard defeats the Confederates at Cherau......March 3, 1865 Benjamin F. Perry appointed provisional governor of South Carolina by President Johnson......June 30 1865 A convention called by Governor Perry assembles in Baptist church at Columbia, Sept. 13, repeals the ordinance of secession, Sept. 19, and completes an amended constitution, which takes effect without being submitted to the people......Sept. 27, 1865 Legislature ratifies the Thirteenth Amendment......Nov. 13, 1865 Legislature rejects the Fourteenth Amendment......December, 1866 Gen. D. E. Sickles assigned to the command of 2d Military District, embracing North and South Carolina, with headquarters at Columbia......M
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), War of 1812, (search)
erve longer under the incompetent Wilkinson, and it was determined, at a council of war, to abandon the expedition against Montreal. The troops went into winter quarters at French Mills (afterwards Covington), on the Salmon River. The news of Perry's victory on Lake Erie (see Erie, Lake, battle on) startled the British public, and strange confessions of weakness were made in the English and provincial newspapers. We have been conquered on the lake, said a Halifax paper, and so we shall be of-war Pelican captures the brig Argus in the British channel......Aug. 14, 1813 Massacre at Fort Mimms, Ala., by the Creek Indians......Aug. 30, 1813 Brig Enterprise captures British brig Boxer off the coast of Maine.......Sept. 5, 1813 Perry's victory on Lake Erie......Sept. 10, 1813 Detroit, Mich., reoccupied by the United States forces......Sept. 28, 1813 Battle of the Thames, Upper Canada; Harrison defeats Proctor; death of Tecumseh......Oct. 5, 1813 Action at Chrysler's
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