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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 19 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 5 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Perry or search for Perry in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General B. H. Anderson's report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
P. Hill, commanding the Third Army corps, my command, composed of Wilcox's, Mahone's, Wright's, Perry's and Posey's brigades, and Lane's battalion of artillery, moved on the afternoon of the 14th of the wood, and the line of battle was formed with the brigades in the following order: Wilcox's, Perry's (commanded by Colonel David Lang), Wright's, Posey's and Mahone's. The enemy's line was plampelled to retire. They fell back in the same succession in which they had advanced — Wilcox's, Perry's, Wright's and Posey's. They regained their position in the line of battle. The enemy did not ow. Pickets were again thrown to the front, and the troops lay upon their arms. In Wilcox's, Perry's and Wright's brigades the loss was very heavy. On the third of July nothing of consequence to hold it, gave way and fell back — their support giving way at the same time. Wilcox's and Perry's brigades had been moved forward so as to be in position to render assistance or to take advant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
st of his command towards Chancellorsville. General Jackson followed at dawn next morning, with the remaining divisions of his corps. He reached the position occupied by General Anderson at eight A. M., and immediately began preparations to advance. At eleven A. M. the troops moved forward upon the plank and old turnpike roads — Anderson, with the brigades of Wright and Posey, leading on the former; McLaws, with his three brigades, preceded by Mahone's, on the latter. Generals Wilcox and Perry, of Anderson's division, co-operated with McLaws. Jackson's troops followed Anderson on the plank road. Colonel Alexander's battalion of artillery accompanied the advance. The enemy was soon encountered on both roads, and heavy skirmishing with infantry and artillery ensued, our troops pressing steadily forward. A strong attack upon General McLaws was repulsed with spirit by Semmes' brigade; and General Wright, by direction of General Anderson, diverging to the left of the plank road, ma