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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Polybius, Histories 296 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 36 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 22 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 18 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 18 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.). You can also browse the collection for Carthage (Tunisia) or search for Carthage (Tunisia) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 131 (search)
Happiness, riches, power; to-day you have nothing, to-morrow you will have all, oh! chief of happy Athens. Sausage-Seller Why not leave me to wash my tripe and to sell my sausages instead of making game of me? Demosthenes Oh! the fool! Your tripe! Do you see these tiers of people? Sausage-Seller Yes. Demosthenes You shall be master to them all, governor of the market, of the harbors, of the Pnyx; you shall trample the Senate under foot, be able to cashier the generals, load them with fetters, throw them into gaol, and you will fornicate in the Prytaneum. Sausage-Seller What! I? Demosthenes You, without a doubt. But you do not yet see all the glory awaiting you. Stand on your basket and look at all the islands that surround Athens. Sausage-Seller I see them. What then? Demosthenes Look at the storehouses and the shipping. Sausage-Seller Yes, I am looking. Demosthenes Exists there a mortal more blest than you? Furthermore, turn your right eye towards Caria and your left toward Carthage!
Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 1300 (search)
Leader of the Chorus It is said that the triremes assembled in council and that the oldest spoke in these terms, “Are you ignorant, my sisters, of what is plotting in Athens? They say that a certain Hyperbolus, a bad citizen and an infamous scoundrel, asks for a hundred of us to take them to sea against Carthage.” All were indignant, and one of them, as yet a virgin, cried, “May god forbid that I should ever obey him! I would prefer to grow old in the harbor and be gnawed by worms. No! by the gods I swear it, Nauphante, daughter of Nauson, shall never bend to his law; that's as true as I am made of wood and pitch. If the Athenians vote for the proposal of Hyperbolus, let them! we will hoist full sail and seek refuge by the temple of Theseus or the shrine of the Eumenides. No! he shall not command us! No! he shall not play with the city to this extent! Let him sail by himself for Tartarus, if such please him, launching the boats in which he used to sell his l