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Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Trachiniae (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 2 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
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Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 78 (search)
I want you also, Athenians, to hear that other decree moved by Demosthenes,One of the several decrees relating to defence proposed by Demosthenes after Chaeronea; the oracle is mentioned in the speech on the False Embassy (Dem. 19.297 sq.). the decree which this democratic statesman proposed when the city was in disorder after the battle of Chaeronea, and also the oracle sent from Dodona from Dodonian Zeus; for it has long been warning you clearly to beware of your leaders and advisers. Read the oracle first. Oracle
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 866 (search)
f [being seen in front of these halls, my daughter]. Enter by Eisodos B Orestes in travelling costume. Chorus Leader Look, here comes a stranger, a man of different hue from ourselves, hastening towards us with speedy step. Orestes Ladies who dwell in this foreign land, is this the house of Achilles' son and his royal residence? Chorus Leader It is. But who are you that ask this? Orestes My name is Orestes, and I am son of Agamemnon and Clytaemestra. I am going to the oracle of Zeus at Dodona. But since I have arrived in Phthia, I have decided to learn whether my kinswoman, Hermione of Sparta, is alive and enjoying good fortune. For though the land she dwells in is far off from me, she is nonetheless dear to me. Hermione kneels before Orestes and grasps his knees. Hermione O son of Agamemnon, appearing like a haven from storm to sailors, I beg you by your knees, have pity on me for the ill-luck you see me suffering, for my fortunes are not good! I place about your knees my arm
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 960 (search)
e captains]; now if we can forestall him, you are saved, but if you are too late, we are ruined and you will die. Menoeceus Where can I escape? To what city? To which of our guest-friends? Creon Where you will be furthest removed from this land. Menoeceus It is for you to name a place, for me to carry out your bidding. Creon After passing Delphi— Menoeceus Where must I go, father? Creon To Aetolia. Menoeceus And where must I go from there? Creon To the land of Thesprotia. Menoeceus To Dodona's holy threshold? Creon You understand. Menoeceus What protection will I find there? Creon The god will send you on your way. Menoeceus How shall I find the means? Creon I will supply you with money. Menoeceus A good plan of yours, father. Go now; for I will come to your sister, Jocasta, at whose breast I was suckled when bereft of my mother, a lonely orphan, [to give her greeting and then I will save my life]. Come, come! be going; it isn't your part to hinder me.Creon departs
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 46 (search)
etermined, if he could, to forestall the increase of the Persian power before they became great. Having thus determined, he at once made inquiries of the Greek and Libyan oracles, sending messengers separately to Delphi, to Abae in Phocia, and to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius,That is, to the oracular shrines of these legendary heroes. and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he toldand to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius,That is, to the oracular shrines of these legendary heroes. and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he told others to go inquire of Ammon in Libya. His intent in sending was to test the knowledge of the oracles, so that, if they were found to know the truth, he might send again and ask if he should undertake an expedition against the Persians.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 52 (search)
Formerly, in all their sacrifices, the Pelasgians called upon gods without giving name or appellation to any (I know this, because I was told at Dodona); for as yet they had not heard of such. They called them godsOn the supposition that qeo/s meant “a disposer,” connected with qesmo/s, ti/qhmi, etc. from the fact that, besides sfirst they learned the names of the rest of the gods, which came to them from Egypt, and, much later, the name of Dionysus; and presently they asked the oracle at Dodona about the names; for this place of divination, held to be the most ancient in Hellas, was at that time the only one. When the Pelasgians, then, asked at Dodona whent in Hellas, was at that time the only one. When the Pelasgians, then, asked at Dodona whether they should adopt the names that had come from foreign parts, the oracle told them to use the names. From that time onwards they used the names of the gods in their sacrifices; and the Greeks received these later from the Pelasgian
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 53 (search)
But whence each of the gods came to be, or whether all had always been, and how they appeared in form, they did not know until yesterday or the day before, so to speak; for I suppose Hesiod and Homer flourished not more than four hundred years earlier than I; and these are the ones who taught the Greeks the descent of the gods, and gave the gods their names, and determined their spheres and functions, and described their outward forms. But the poets who are said to have been earlier than these men were, in my opinion, later. The earlier part of all this is what the priestesses of Dodona tell; the later, that which concerns Hesiod and Homer, is what I myself say.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 55 (search)
That, then, I heard from the Theban priests; and what follows, the prophetesses of Dodona say: that two black doves had come flying from Thebes in Egypt, one to Libya and one to Dodona; the latter settled on an oak tree, and there uttered human spDodona; the latter settled on an oak tree, and there uttered human speech, declaring that a place of divination from Zeus must be made there; the people of Dodona understood that the message was divine, and therefore established the oracular shrine. The dove which came to Libya told the Libyans (they say) to make an oDodona understood that the message was divine, and therefore established the oracular shrine. The dove which came to Libya told the Libyans (they say) to make an oracle of Ammon; this also is sacred to Zeus. Such was the story told by the Dodonaean priestesses, the eldest of whom was Promeneia and the next Timarete and the youngest Nicandra; and the rest of the servants of the temple at Dodona similarly held iAmmon; this also is sacred to Zeus. Such was the story told by the Dodonaean priestesses, the eldest of whom was Promeneia and the next Timarete and the youngest Nicandra; and the rest of the servants of the temple at Dodona similarly held it true.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 57 (search)
I expect that these women were called “doves” by the people of Dodona because they spoke a strange language, and the people thought it like the cries of birds; then the woman spoke what they could understand, and that is why they say that the dove uttered human speech; as long as she spoke in a foreign tongue, they thought her voice was like the voice of a bird. For how could a dove utter the speech of men? The tale that the dove was black signifies that the woman was EgyptianPerhaps Herodotuse, they thought her voice was like the voice of a bird. For how could a dove utter the speech of men? The tale that the dove was black signifies that the woman was EgyptianPerhaps Herodotus' explanation is right. But the name “doves” may be purely symbolic; thus priestesses of Demeter and Artemis were sometimes called Bees.. The fashions of divination at Thebes of Egypt and at Dodona are like one another; moreover, the practice of divining from the sacrificed victim has also come from
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 33 (search)
thia; when these have passed Scythia, each nation in turn receives them from its neighbors until they are carried to the Adriatic sea, which is the most westerly limit of their journey; from there, they are brought on to the south, the people of Dodona being the first Greeks to receive them. From Dodona they come down to the Melian gulf, and are carried across to Euboea, and one city sends them on to another until they come to Carystus; after this, Andros is left out of their journey, for CarysDodona they come down to the Melian gulf, and are carried across to Euboea, and one city sends them on to another until they come to Carystus; after this, Andros is left out of their journey, for Carystians carry them to Tenos, and Tenians to Delos. Thus (they say) these offerings come to Delos. But on the first journey, the Hyperboreans sent two maidens bearing the offerings, to whom the Delians give the names Hyperoche and Laodice, and five men of their people with them as escort for safe conduct, those who are now called PerphereesThat is, probably, the Bearers. and greatly honored at Delos. But when those whom they sent never returned, they took it amiss that they should be condemned alwa
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 9, chapter 93 (search)
hen Evenius was aware of it, he held his peace and told no man, intending to restore what was lost by buying others. This matter was not, however, hidden from the people of Apollonia, and when it came to their knowledge they brought him to judgment and condemned him to lose his eyesight for sleeping at his watch. So they blinded Evenius, but from the day of their so doing their flocks bore no offspring, nor did their land yield fruit as before. Furthermore, a declaration was given to them at Dodona and Delphi, when they inquired of the prophets what might be the cause of their present ill: the gods told them by their prophets that they had done unjustly in blinding Evenius, the guardian of the sacred flock, “for we ourselves” (they said) “sent those wolves, and we will not cease from avenging him until you make him such restitution for what you did as he himself chooses and approves; when that is fully done, we ourselves will give Evenius such a gift as will make many men consider him <
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