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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 16 0 Browse Search
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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
Antiphon, Speeches (ed. K. J. Maidment) 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 41-50 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Georgics (ed. J. B. Greenough) 2 0 Browse Search
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Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 21 (search)
Such were our respective reasons for making the voyage. In the course of it, we happened to meet with a storm which forced us to put in at a place within the territory of Methymna, where the boat on to which Herodes transhipped, and on which the prosecution maintain that he met his end, lay at anchor. Now consider these circumstances in themselves to begin with; they were due to chance, not to any design on my part. It has nowhere been shown that I persuaded Herodes to accompany me; on the contrary, it has been shown that I made the voyage independently on business of my own.
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 77 (search)
But from the moment that you punished the authors of the revolt—of whom my father was not found to be one—and granted the other citizens of Mytilene an amnesty which allowed them to continue living on their own land,See Thuc. 3.50. The walls of Mytilene were rased, her fleet taken from her, and the entire island, except for Methymna, divided among Athenian cleruchs. These drew a fixed rent from the inhabitants, who continued to work the land. he has not been guilty of a single fault, of a single lapse from duty. He has failed neither the city of Athens nor that of Mytilene, when a public service was demanded of him; he regularly furnishes choruses, and always pays the imposts.The choruses mentioned were of course local, and performed at the Mytilenean festivals. The “services to Athens” amount to nothing more than the payment of te/lh(?harbor-dues). Professor Wade-Gery suggests to me that the ei)kosth/ may be meant, a 5 per cent impost which replaced the tribute early in 413
Demosthenes, Against Leochares, section 9 (search)
eath of their father the brothers gave Archidicê in marriage to Leostratus of EleusisEleusis was a deme of the tribe Hippothontis. ; of the three brothers Archippus lost his life at MethymnaMethymna was a town in Lesbos. while serving as trierarch, and Meidylides not long afterward married Mnesimache, the daughter of Lysippus of Crioa.Crioa was a deme Archidicê in marriage to Leostratus of EleusisEleusis was a deme of the tribe Hippothontis. ; of the three brothers Archippus lost his life at MethymnaMethymna was a town in Lesbos. while serving as trierarch, and Meidylides not long afterward married Mnesimache, the daughter of Lysippus of Crioa.Crioa was a deme of the tribe Antiochis.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 23 (search)
disclosed the oracle's answer to Thrasybulus, was the son of Cypselus, and sovereign of Corinth. The Corinthians say (and the Lesbians agree) that the most marvellous thing that happened to him in his life was the landing on Taenarus of Arion of Methymna, brought there by a dolphin. This Arion was a lyre-player second to none in that age; he was the first man whom we know to compose and name the dithyrambThe dithyramb was a kind of dance-music particularly associated with the cult of Dionysus. wbulus, was the son of Cypselus, and sovereign of Corinth. The Corinthians say (and the Lesbians agree) that the most marvellous thing that happened to him in his life was the landing on Taenarus of Arion of Methymna, brought there by a dolphin. This Arion was a lyre-player second to none in that age; he was the first man whom we know to compose and name the dithyrambThe dithyramb was a kind of dance-music particularly associated with the cult of Dionysus. which he afterwards taught at Corinth.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 151 (search)
These then are the Aeolian cities on the mainland, besides those that are situated on Ida and are separate. Among those on the islands, five divide Lesbos among them (there was a sixth on Lesbos, Arisba, but its people were enslaved by their kinfolk of Methymna); there is one on Tenedos, and one again in the “Hundred Isles,”A group of small islands between Lesbos and the mainland. as they are called. The men of Lesbos and Tenedos, then, like the Ionian islanders, had nothing to fear. The rest of the cities deliberated together and decided to follow the Ionians' lea
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Boeotia, chapter 30 (search)
Lysippus; the standing image, however, of Dionysus, that Sulla dedicated, is the most noteworthy of the works of Myron after the Erectheus at Athens. What he dedicated was not his own; he took it away from the Minyae of Orchomenus. This is an illustration of the Greek proverb, “to worship the gods with other people's incense.” Of poets or famous musicians they have set up likenesses of the following. There is Thamyris himself, when already blind, with a broken lyre in his hand, and Arion of Methymna upon a dolphin. The sculptor who made the statue of Sacadas of Argos, not understanding the prelude of Pindar about him, has made the flute-player with a body no bigger than his flute. Hesiod too sits holding a harp upon his knees, a thing not at all appropriate for Hesiod to carry, for his own versesSee Hes. Th. 30. make it clear that he sang holding a laurel wand. As to the age of Hesiod and Homer, I have conducted very careful researches into this matter, but I do not like to write on th
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 19 (search)
rgins may dive into the sea.This sentence is probably a marginal note which has crept into the text. I am going on to tell a Lesbian story. Certain fishermen of Methymna found that their nets dragged up to the surface of the sea a face made of olive-wood. Its appearance suggested a touch of divinity, but it was outlandish, and unlike the normal features of Greek gods. So the people of Methymna asked the Pythian priestess of what god or hero the figure was a likeness, and she bade them worship Dionysus Phallen. Whereupon the people of Methymna kept for themselves the wooden image out of the sea, worshipping it with sacrifices and prayers, but sent a broMethymna kept for themselves the wooden image out of the sea, worshipping it with sacrifices and prayers, but sent a bronze copy to Delphi. The carvings in the pediments are: Artemis, Leto, Apollo, Muses, a setting Sun, and Dionysus together with the Thyiad women. The first of them are the work of Praxias, an Athenian and a pupil of Calamis, but the temple took some time to build, during which Praxias died. So the rest of the ornament in the pedime
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 3, chapter 2 (search)
Immediately after the invasion of the Peloponnesians all Lesbos, except Methymna, revolted from the Athenians. The Lesbians had wished to revolt even before the war, but the Lacedaemonians would not receive them; and yet now when they did revolt, they were compelled to do so sooner than they had intended. While they were waiting until the moles for their harbors and the ships and walls that they had in building should be finished, and for the arrival of archers and corn and other things that they were engaged in fetching from the Pontus, the Tenedians, with whom they were at enmity, and the Methymnians, and some factious persons in Mitylene itself, who were Proxeni of Athens, informed
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 3, chapter 18 (search)
About the same time that the Lacedaemonians were at the Isthmus, the Mitylenians marched by land with their mercenaries against Methymna, which they thought to gain by treachery. After assaulting the town, and not meeting with the success that they anticipated, they withdrew to Antissa, Pyrrha, and Eresus; and taking measures for the better security of these towns and strengthening their walls, hastily returned home. After their departure the Methymnians marched against Antissa,,but were defeated in a sortie by the Antissians and their mercenaries, and retreated in haste after losing many of their number. Word of this reaching Athens, and the Athenians learning that the Mitylenians were masters of t
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 8, chapter 22 (search)
as active as ever, and who even without the Peloponnesians found themselves in sufficient force to effect the revolt of the cities and also wished to have as many companions in peril as possible, made an expedition with thirteen ships of their own to Lesbos; the instructions from Lacedaemon being to go to that island next, and from thence to the Hellespont. Meanwhile the land forces of the Peloponnesians who were with the Chians and of the allies on the spot, moved along shore for Clazomenae and Cuma, under the command of Eualas, a Spartan; while the fleet under Diniades, one of the Perioeci, first sailed up to Methymna and caused it to revolt, and, leaving four ships there, with the rest procured the revolt of Mitylene.
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