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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
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Polybius, Histories, book 2, Gallic Settlements In the Valley of the Po (search)
Gallic Settlements In the Valley of the Po To continue my description. These plains were anciently inhabited by Etruscans,Livy. 5. 17, 33-49; Plutarch, Camillus, 16; Mommsen, History of Rome, vol. i. p. 338 (Eng. tr.) at the same period as what are called the Phlegraean plains round Capua and Nola; which latter, however, have enjoyed the highest reputation, because they lay in a great many people's way and so got known. In speaking then of the history of the Etruscan Empire, we should not refer to the district occupied by them at the present time, but to these northern plains, and to what they did when they inhabited them. Their chief intercourse was with the Celts, because they occupied the adjoining districts; who, envying the beauty of their lands, seized some slight pretext to gather a great host and expel the Etruscans from the valley of the Padus, which they at once took possession of themselves. First, the country near the source of the Padus was occupied by the Laevi and Lebe
Polybius, Histories, book 3, Fertility and Beauty of the Plains Near Capua (search)
s about Capua are the best in Italy for fertility and beauty and proximity to the sea, and for the commercial harbours, into which merchants run who are sailing to Italy from nearly all parts of the world. They contain, moreover, the most famous and beautiful cities of Italy. On its seaboard are Sinuessa, Cumae, Puteoli, Naples, and Nuceria; and inland to the north there are Cales and Teanum, to the east and south [CaudiumHolsten for the *dau/nioi of the old text; others suggest Calatia.] and Nola. In the centre of these plains lies the richest of all the cities, that of Capua. No tale in all mythology wears a greater appearance of probability than that which is told of these, which, like others remarkable for their beauty, are called the Phlegraean plains; for surely none are more likely for beauty and fertility to have been contended for by gods. In addition to these advantages, they are strongly protected by nature and difficult of approach; for one side is protected by the sea, and
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 740 (search)
Almost all the MSS. have Bellae, which Serv. says was written by Virg. instead of Nolae on account of his quarrel with the people of Nola, mentioned in G. 2. 225. Ribbeck adopted Bellae, believing it to be the reading of all the MSS., but the discovery of Abellae in one copy seems to have led him to alter his mind (Prolegomena p.he teeth of all external authosity, the cause of corruption being of the commonest, and proper names especially liable to corruption. Abellae is five miles N.E. of Nola. It was known for a particular kind of nut, filbert or hazel, called nux Abellana. Sil. 8. 543 speaks of it as pauper sulci Cerealis. There are remains of the old articular kind of nut, filbert or hazel, called nux Abellana. Sil. 8. 543 speaks of it as pauper sulci Cerealis. There are remains of the old town on a hill, which accounts for despectant. An inscription was discovered there, one of the most important remains of Oscan, recording a treaty between Abella and Nola (Dict. G. Abella).
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 40 (search)
After he had gone round Campania, and dedicated the capitol at Capua, and a temple to Augustus at Nola,Augustus died at Nola, a city in Campania. See c. lviii. of his life. which he made the pretext of his journey, he retired to Capri; being greatly delighted with the island, because it was accessible only by a narrow beach, being on all sides surrounded with rugged cliffs, of a stupendous height, and by a deep sea. But immediately, the people of Rome being extremely clamorous for his return,Nola, a city in Campania. See c. lviii. of his life. which he made the pretext of his journey, he retired to Capri; being greatly delighted with the island, because it was accessible only by a narrow beach, being on all sides surrounded with rugged cliffs, of a stupendous height, and by a deep sea. But immediately, the people of Rome being extremely clamorous for his return, on account of a disaster at Fidenae, Fidenae stood in a bend of the Tiber, near its junction with the Anio. There are few traces of it remaining. Where upwards of twenty thousand persons had been killed by the fall of the amphitheatre, during a public spectacle of gladiators, he crossed over again to the continent, and gave all people free access to him; so much the more, because, at his departure from the city, he had caused it to be proclaimed that no one should address him, and had declined