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Demosthenes, Against Midias, section 197 (search)
Now when he does so, just reflect, gentlemen of the jury, that this same man brought accusations against the cavalry who had served with him, coming into the Assembly after they had sailed for Olynthus; and now once more, having stayed at home, he will address his denunciation of the people to the men who were then away on service. Are you, then, prepared to admit that you, whether at home or on service, are what Meidias proclaims you to be, or on the contrary that he is, and always has been, an unhallowed ruffian? That is my own opinion of him; [for how else are we to describe a creature whom his own troopers, his brother-officers and his friends cannot stomach?
Demosthenes, Against Aristocrates, section 107 (search)
Again, it cannot possibly be alleged that it was natural that you should be hoodwinked and misled. For even though you had no other basis of calculation, even though you were unable of yourselves to grasp the state of affairs, you had before your eyes the example of those people at Olynthus. What has Philip done for them? And how are they treating him? He restored Potidaea to them, not at a time when he was no longer able to keep them out, as Cersobleptes restored the Chersonesus to you; no,—after spending a great deal of money on his war with you, when he had taken Potidaea, and could have kept it if he chose, he made them a present of the place, without even attempting any other course
Demosthenes, Against Neaera, section 4 (search)
You were at that time on the point of sending your entire force to Euboea and Olynthus,Olynthus, an important city in Chalcidicê. and Apollodorus, being one of its members, brought forward in the senate a bill, and carried it as a preliminary decreeThe senate could not legislate of itself. Decrees passed by it had to be submitted to the popular Olynthus, an important city in Chalcidicê. and Apollodorus, being one of its members, brought forward in the senate a bill, and carried it as a preliminary decreeThe senate could not legislate of itself. Decrees passed by it had to be submitted to the popular assembly. to the assembly, proposing that the people should decide whether the funds remaining over from the state's expenditure should be used for military purposes or for public spectacles. For the laws prescribed that, when there was war, the funds remaining over from state expenditures should be devoted to military purposes, and Apollodorus believed that the people ought to have power to do
Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 26 (search)
This man who fraternizes, as he will presently tell you, with our allies, behaved very differently; he would not part with any of the money which he had received for their protection. Remember these things, gentlemen; consider the disasters caused by traitors in the downfall of Olynthus and of Thebes; decide wisely now in your interest; destroy those who are ready to take bribes against their country and so rest your hopes of safety on yourselves and on the gods.
Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 28 (search)
ming to us from Philip and was responsible for finishing the first war.The first war with Macedon (349-346 B.C.) was undertaken by Athens and Olynthus against Philip. Even before Olynthus was taken the king made overtures of peace, and it was Philocrates who pOlynthus was taken the king made overtures of peace, and it was Philocrates who proposed in Athens that these negotiations should begin. However, after the fall of Olynthus in 348, the Athenians tried to unite other Greek states against Philip, and it was not until this attempt had failed that Demosthenes acquieOlynthus in 348, the Athenians tried to unite other Greek states against Philip, and it was not until this attempt had failed that Demosthenes acquiesced in peace proposals. In 347 he defended Philocrates, who was accused of illegality in making his first peace proposals, and himself served on an embassy to Macedon. The final peace was signed in 346, when Antipater and Parmenio came to Athens as Philip's e
Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 44 (search)
Did he get nothing for proposing that TaurosthenesDinarchus, like Aeschines, is distorting the facts. (Cf. Aeschin. 3 85 sq. and schol. ad loc.). The cities of Euboea had entered the Athenian alliance in 357 B.C., but in 348 they revolted, probably owing to the intrigues of Philip with whom Athens was now at war over Olynthus. Taurosthenes and Callias commanded the army of Chalcis and the Athenians lost control of the island. In 343 however they transferred the allegiance of Chalcis to Athens, and a few years later-the exact date is not certain-were made Athenian citizens on the motion of Demosthenes (cf. Hyp. 5 col. 20), whom Aeschines says they bribed. should become an Athenian, though he had enslave
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 34 (search)
r victory in the sea-battle, the Corinthians were incensed at them. Being eager, therefore, to retaliate upon the Athenians, they incited the city of Potidaea, which was one of their own colonies, to revolt from the Athenians. And in like manner Peridiccas, the king of the Macedonians, who was also at odds with the Athenians, persuaded the Chalcidians, who had revolted from the Athenians, to abandon their cities on the sea and unite in forming a single city known as Olynthus. When the Athenians heard of the revolt of the Potidaeans, they dispatched thirty ships with orders to ravage the territory of the rebels and to sack their city; and the expedition landed in Macedonia, as the Athenian people had ordered them to do, and undertook the siege of Potidaea. Thereupon the Corinthians came to the help of the besieged with two thousand soldiers and the Athenian people also sent two thousand. In the battle which took place on the isthmus near
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 47 (search)
me the Lacedaemonians continued bringing up engines with which they kept shattering the walls and making assaults without interruption. But when they found themselves unable to take the city through their assaults, they left an adequate guard before it and returned to the Peloponnesus. The Athenians appointed Xenophon and Phanomachus generals and sent them to Thrace with a thousand soldiers. When this force arrived at SpartolusIn the Thracian Chalcidice near Olynthus. in the territory of Bottice, it laid waste the land and cut the grain in the first growth. But the Olynthians came to the aid of the Bottiaeans and defeated them in battle; and there were slain of the Athenians both the generals and the larger part of the soldiers. And while this was taking place, the Lacedaemonians, yielding to the request of the Ambraciotes, made a campaign against Acarnania. Their leader was Cnemus and he had a thousand foot-soldiers and a
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 77 (search)
ghout the Peloponnesus was as has been described. In the regions outside,Since the following three tribes are of southern Thessaly, apparently Diodorus does not consider that area to be a part of Greece proper. the Aenianians, Dolopians, and Melians, having come to an understanding, advanced with strong armaments against Heracleia in Trachis. The Heracleians drew up to oppose them and a great battle took place, in which the people of Heracleia were defeated. Since they had lost many soldiers and had sought refuge within their walls, they sent for aid from the Boeotians. The Thebans dispatched to their help a thousand picked hoplites, with whose aid they held off their adversaries. While these events were taking place, the Olynthians dispatched an army against the city of MecybernaSituated a short distance east of Olynthus. which had an Athenian garrison, drove out the garrison, and themselves took possession of the city.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 122 (search)
Now when the fleet had left Xerxes, it sailed through the Athos canal which reached to the gulf in which are located the towns of Assa, Pilorus, Singus, and Sarte. The fleet took on board troops from all these cities and then headed for the Thermaic gulf. Then rounding Ampelus, the headland of Torone, it passed the Greek towns of Torone, Galepsus, Sermyle, Mecyberna, and Olynthus, all of which gave them ships and men.
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