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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 30 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
hreatening to make war on Troy.As to the siege and capture of Troy by Herakles, see below, Apollod. 2.6.4. And he touched at Aenus, where he was entertained by Poltys. And as he was sailing away he shot and killed on the Aenian beach a lewd fellow, Sarpedon, son of Poseidon and brother of Poltys. And having come to Thasos and subjugated the Thracians who dwelt in the island, he gave it to the sons of Androgeus to dwell in. From Thasos he proceeded to Torone, and there, being challenged to wrestle by Polygonus and Telegonus, sons of Proteus, son of Poseidon, he killed them in the wrestling match.Compare Tzetzes, Chiliades ii.320 sq. And having brought the belt to Mycenae he gave it to Eurystheus. As a tenth labour he was ordered to fetch the kine of Geryon from Erythia.As to Herakles and the cattle of Geryon, see Hes. Th. 287-294ff.; Hes. Th. 979-983; Pind. Frag. 169(151) ed. Sandys; Hdt. 4.8; P
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Contents of the Twelfth Book of Diodorus (search)
ecause he left his place in the ranks (chap. 64). —On the war between the Lacedaemonians and Athenians over the Megarians (chap. 66). —The war between the Lacedaemonians and Athenians over the Chalcidians (chaps. 67-68). —The battle in Boeotia between the Athenians and the Boeotians (chaps. 69-70). —The campaign of the Athenians against the Lesbian exiles (chap. 72). —The expulsion of the Delians by the Athenians (chap. 73). —The capture and destruction of Torone by the Athenians (chap. 73). —How, after the Athenians and Lacedaemonians had concluded an alliance between them, the rest of the cities were alienated from them (chaps. 74-76). —How the Delians were restored by the Athenians to their native state (chap. 77). —How the Lacedaemonians waged war upon the Mantineans and Argives (chaps. 78-79). —The campaign of the Byzantians and Calchedonians against Bithynia (chap. 82). —On the reasons why the
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 68 (search)
f which some were Greek, being colonies from Andros, and the others had a populace of barbarians of BisalticA Thracian tribe. origin, which were bilingual. After mastering these cities Brasidas led his army against the city of Torone, which was a colony of the Chalcidians but was held by Athenians. Since certain men were ready to betray the city, Brasidas was by night admitted by them and got Torone in his power without a fight.To such a height did the fortunesm Andros, and the others had a populace of barbarians of BisalticA Thracian tribe. origin, which were bilingual. After mastering these cities Brasidas led his army against the city of Torone, which was a colony of the Chalcidians but was held by Athenians. Since certain men were ready to betray the city, Brasidas was by night admitted by them and got Torone in his power without a fight.To such a height did the fortunes of Brasidas attain in the course of this year.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 73 (search)
e regions lying off Thrace. He sailed to Scione, where he added to his force soldiers from the besiegers of the city, and then sailed away and put in at Torone; for he knew that Brasidas had gone from these parts and that the soldiers who were left in Torone were not strong enough to offer battle. After encampiTorone were not strong enough to offer battle. After encamping near Torone and besieging the city both by land and by sea, he took it by storm, and the children and women he sold into slavery, but the men who garrisoned the city he took captive, fettered them, and sent them to Athens. Then, leaving an adequate garrison for the city, he sailed away with his army and putTorone and besieging the city both by land and by sea, he took it by storm, and the children and women he sold into slavery, but the men who garrisoned the city he took captive, fettered them, and sent them to Athens. Then, leaving an adequate garrison for the city, he sailed away with his army and put in at the Strymon River in Thrace. Pitching camp near the city of Eion, which is about thirty stades distant from Amphipolis, he launched successive assaults upon the town.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 22 (search)
suffered shipwreck, for about three years preparations had been underway there. Triremes were anchored off Elaeus in the Chersonese; with these for their headquarters, all sorts of men in the army were compelled by whippings to dig a canal, coming by turns to the work; the inhabitants about Athos also dug. Bubares son of Megabazus and Artachaees son of Artaeus, both Persians, were the overseers of the workmen. Athos is a great and famous mountain, running out into the sea and inhabited by men. At the mountain's landward end it is in the form of a peninsula, and there is an isthmus about twelve stadia wide; here is a place of level ground or little hills, from the sea by Acanthus to the sea opposite Torone. On this isthmus which is at the end of Athos, there stands a Greek town, Sane; there are others situated seaward of Sane and landward of Athos, and the Persian now intended to make them into island and not mainland towns; they are Dion, Olophyxus, Acrothoum, Thyssus, and Cleonae.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 122 (search)
Now when the fleet had left Xerxes, it sailed through the Athos canal which reached to the gulf in which are located the towns of Assa, Pilorus, Singus, and Sarte. The fleet took on board troops from all these cities and then headed for the Thermaic gulf. Then rounding Ampelus, the headland of Torone, it passed the Greek towns of Torone, Galepsus, Sermyle, Mecyberna, and Olynthus, all of which gave them ships and men. Now when the fleet had left Xerxes, it sailed through the Athos canal which reached to the gulf in which are located the towns of Assa, Pilorus, Singus, and Sarte. The fleet took on board troops from all these cities and then headed for the Thermaic gulf. Then rounding Ampelus, the headland of Torone, it passed the Greek towns of Torone, Galepsus, Sermyle, Mecyberna, and Olynthus, all of which gave them ships and men.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 8, chapter 127 (search)
Thereupon Artabazus laid siege to Potidaea, and suspecting that Olynthus too was plotting revolt from the king, he laid siege to it also. This town was held by Bottiaeans who had been driven from the Thermaic gulf by the Macedonians. Having besieged and taken Olynthus, he brought these men to a lake and there cut their throats and delivered their city over to the charge of Critobulus of Torone and the Chalcidian people. It was in this way that the Chalcidians gained possession of Olynthus.
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 63 (search)
as is ever their habit—to denounce our city, to recount the most offensive acts which transpired while she held the empire of the sea, to present in a false light the adjudication of lawsuits in Athens for the alliesMembers of the Confederacy of Delos had to bring certain lawsuits, especially those which involved disloyalty to the league in any way, to Athens for trial. See Isoc. 4.113, note. and her collection of tributeSee Isoc. 7.2, note. from them, and above all to dwell on the cruelties suffered at her hands by the Melians and the Scionians and the Toronians,For the treatment of Melos and Scione see Isoc. 4.100, note, and 109. Torone was captured by Cleon in 422 B.C. The men of the town were sent as prisoners to Athens, and the women and children sold into slavery (Thuc. 5.3). thinking by these reproaches to sully the benefactions of Athens which I have just descr
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 4, chapter 110 (search)
Upon their not submitting, he at once marched against Torone in Chalcidice, which was held by an Athenian garrison, having been invited by a few persons who were prepared to hand over the town. Arriving in the dark a little before daybreak, he sat down with his army near the temple of the Dioscuri, rather more than a quarter of a mile from the city. The rest of the town of Torone and the Athenians in garrison did not perceive his approach; but his partisans knowing that he was coming (a few of them had secretly gone out to meet him), were on the watch for his arrival, and were no sooner aware of it than they took in to them seven light-armed men with daggers, who alone of twenty men ordered on this se
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 4, chapter 114 (search)
same to their positions. Meanwhile he called a meeting of the Toronaeans, and said very much what he had said at Acanthus, namely, that they must not look upon those who had negotiated with him for the capture of the town as bad men or as traitors, as they had not acted as they had done from corrupt motives or in order to enslave the city, but for the good and freedom of Torone; nor again must those who had not shared in the enterprise fancy that they would not equally reap its fruits, as he had not come to destroy either city or individual. This was the reason of his proclamation to those that had fled for refuge to the Athenians: he thought none the worse of them for their friendship for the Athenians; he believed that they had only to make tr
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