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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 50 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations 42 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Americus Vespucius, 1451-1512 (search)
f, and that herein he hoped to do you service; wherefore I set me to do it; because I am assured that your Magnificence holds me in the number of your servants, remembering that in the time of our youth I was your friend, and now (am your) servant; and (remembering our) going to hear the rudiments of grammar under the fair example and instruction of the venerable monk friar of Saint Mark Fra Giorgio Antonio Vespucci; whose counsels and teaching would to God that I had followed; for as saith Petrarch, I should be another man than what I am. Howbeit soever. I grieve not: because I have ever taken delight in worthy matters; and although these trifles of mine may not be suitable to your virtues, I will say to you as said Pliny to Maecenas, you were sometime wont to take pleasure in my prattlings; even though your Magnificence be continuously busied in public affairs, you will take some hour of relaxation to consume a little time in frivolous or amusing things; and as fennel is enstomarily
righter and brighter as years roll by, — tardy justice. Famous cannon of the world. In the eleventh century, if we may credit the chronicle of Alphonso VI., written by Pedro, bishop of Leon, the vessels of the king of Tunis, in the attack on Seville, had on board a number of iron pipes, out of which volumes of thundering fire were discharged. In the fourteenth century the references to the uses of cannon became common. Ferdinand took Gibraltar from the Moors by cannon, in 1308. Petrarch refers to them about the same time. The English (at Crecy, 1346), the Moors, Arragonese, French, and Danes, used them during that century. Metallic cannon were originally made by welding bars of iron longitudinally and binding them by rings, which were shrunk on over them while hot, — a plan which, with some modifications, has been revived of late years, and seems more feasible in the present state of the arts than it was 500 years ago. Some of these ancient guns were breech-loaders,
sodomon had courses of varying hight. See masonry. I-so-met′ri-cal pro-jec′tion. A mode of drawing machines or buildings, in which the plan and elevations are shown in one view. Three planes are projected at an equal angle upon a single plane. I-tal′ian I′ron. A laundress's smoothing-iron for fluting and smoothing frills. I-tal′ian roof. A hip-roof. I-tal′ic. Inclined type of a peculiar form, as, — Italic type is said to have been copied from the handwriting of Petrarch, by the famous printer Aldus Manutius. He obtained a patent for the use of this character in type from Pope Leo X., surnamed The Great. I′vo-ride. An artificial ivory. A vulcanite whitened by abundant quantity of some white material. See ivory, artificial. I′vo-ry. Specifically, the material constituting the tusk of the elephant. In a more general sense the term includes the tusks of the walrus, narwhal, and even the teeth of some other cetacea. The African
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, I. A Cambridge boyhood (search)
that day. Many of them were sold in his adversity, yet nearly a thousand volumes remained, chiefly of English literature and history of the eighteenth century; and most of these I read. There was a fine set of Dr. Johnson's works in a dozen volumes, with an early edition of Boswell; all of Hoole's Tasso and Ariosto; a charming little edition of the British essayists, with pretty woodcuts; Bewick's Birds and Quadrupeds; Raynal's Indies; the Anti-Jacobin; Plutarch's Lives; Dobson's Life of Petrarch; Marshall's and Bancroft's Lives of Washington; Miss Burney's and Miss Edgeworth's works; and Sir Charles Grandison. There were many volumes of sermons, which my mother was fond of reading,--she was, I think, the last person who habitually read them,--but which I naturally avoided. There were a good many pretty little Italian books, belonging to one of my elder sisters, and a stray volume of Goethe which had been used by another. In out-of-the-way closets I collected the disused classica
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 5 (search)
cupied by Judge Fay. And as my friend Maria Fay was a cousin of some of the Brothers and Sisters, they made the house an occasional rendezvous; and as there were attractive younger kindred whom I chanced to know, I was able at least to look through the door of this paradise of youth. Lowell's first volume had just been published, and all its allusions were ground of romance for us all; indeed, he and his betrothed were to me, as they seemed to be for those of their circle, a modernized Petrarch and Laura or even Dante and Beatrice; and I watched them with unselfish reverence. Their love-letters, about which they were extremely frank, were passed from hand to hand, and sometimes reached me through Thaxter. I have some of Maria White's ballads in her own handwriting; and I still know by heart a letter which she wrote to Thaxter, about the delay in her marriage,--It is easy enough to be married; the newspaper comers show us that, every day; but to live and to be happy as simple Kin
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
ca. Who reads Twice-told Tales? In 1867, Colonel Higginson translated various sonnets from Petrarch, wrote essays and short stories for the Atlantic, continued his army papers, and compiled a lits usual exercise. In the summer of this year (1867), he embodied some of his translations of Petrarch's sonnets in a paper which he thus described in a letter to J. T. Fields, whom he called his poet-publisher:— I am writing a species of rhapsody called Sunshine and Petrarch, supposed to be written outof-doors; a kind of plum pudding, Nature furnishing the pudding-Petrarch the plums, trankeep this the rest of the week, probably. His diary records:— For the first time took my Petrarch writing outdoor . . . sat at different points, chiefly at Myers House—yard full of spiraea, lilThe book also received a flattering reception from an Italian society at Arezzo formed to honor Petrarch's memory. The beginning of Colonel Higginson's work on Malbone is thus noted:— To-day
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
(In Atlantic Monthly, July.) Reprinted in Def. V, under the title An Artist's Creation. Up the Edisto. (In Atlantic Monthly, Aug.) Def. III. Sunshine and Petrarch. (In Atlantic Monthly, Sept.) Def. V. Literature as an Art. (In Atlantic Monthly, Dec.) Same. (In his Atlantic Essays. 1871.) Articles. (In Independent0. Personality of Emerson. (In Outlook, May 23.) Address. (In Centenary of the Birth of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Concord, May 25.) (Tr.) Fifteen Sonnets of Petrarch. The introduction is based essentially upon Sunshine and Petrarch (1867), which originally included most of the sonnets in this volume. This edition consists oPetrarch (1867), which originally included most of the sonnets in this volume. This edition consists of 430 numbered copies. Articles. (In Christian Endeavor World, Independent, Outlook, Success.) 1904 Address on Decoration Day in Sanders Theatre [Cambridge], May 30. Pph. The Sunny Side of the Transcendental Period. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan.) English and American Cousins. (In Atlantic Monthly, Feb.) Books Un
; on his own style, 274, 275; Malbone, 275, 278-82, 289; and Atlantic Monthly, 275; Driftwood Fire, 275, 276; translates Petrarch, 276-78; compiles Child Pictures from Dickens, 277; literary work, 277, 279; working on Army Life, 282; increased reputa, published, 281, 282. Manning, Cardinal, account of, 328, 329. Marguerite, Queen of Italy, Higginson's Sonnets of Petrarch sent to, 278. Marks, Lionel, poem on engagement of, 388, 389. Martineau, James, reception at, 329. Massachusett Pedro, Dom, of Brazil, account of, 261, 262. Perkins, Stephen H., Higginson becomes tutor in family of, 45-54. Petrarch, Fifteen Sonnets of, 278, 425. Phillips, Wendell, 113, 132; impression of Higginson, 96; and Burns affair, 142; faarty led by, 168. Sumner, Charles, 38, 166, 238; described, 96, 97; buys and frees negro family, 153. Sunshine and Petrarch, 276-78, 410. Swanwich, Anna, 334. Swinburne, A. C., on Lowell, 336; Higginson visits, 359, 360. Sympathy of Reli
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Fanny Fern-Mrs. Parton. (search)
ical dissertations, andreceived a doctor's degree from the University of Padua; Laura Bassi, Novella d'andrea, and Matelda Tambroni were honored with degrees, and filled professors' chairs in the University of Bologna; but as far as I have been able to ascertain, by the most careful researches, not one of these learned ladies ever furnished an article for the Ledger every week for fourteen years., Corinna, for her improvisations, was crowned at the Capitol in Rome with the sacred laurel of Petrarch and Tasso; but she never furnished an article every week for the Ledger for fourteen years. Miss Burney, Miss Porter, Mrs. Radcliffe, Miss Austin, Miss Baillie, Miss Mitford, Miss Landon, Mrs. Hemans, Mrs. Marsh, Mrs. Gaskell, and the Brontes did themselves and their sex great honor by their literary labors; but not one of them ever furnished an article for the Ledger every week for fourteen years. Neither Mrs. Lewes nor Mrs. Stowe could do it, George Sand wouldn't do it, and Heaven forb
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
ing a sort of general lecture on Schiller; Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea; Goetz von Berlichingen; Iphigenia; first part of Faust,--three weeks of thorough study this, as valuable to me as to them; and Clavigo,--thus comprehending samples of all his efforts in poetry, and bringing forward some of his prominent opinions; Lessing's Nathan, Minna, Emilia Galeotti; parts of Tieck's Phantasus, and nearly the whole first volume of Richter's Titan. With the Italian class, I read parts of Tasso, Petrarch,whom they came to almost adore,--Ariosto, Alfieri, and the whole hundred cantos of the Divina Commedia, with the aid of the fine Athenaeum copy, Flaxman's designs, and all the best commentaries. This last piece of work was and will be truly valuable to myself. She was invited, in 1837, to become a teacher in a private school just organized, on Mr. Alcott's plan, in Providence, R. I. The proposal is, she wrote, that I shall teach the elder girls my favorite branches for four hours a day
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