hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
of the country, and the fact that the enemy, expecting us to move that way, had carefully guarded all the crossing-places, was almost impossible. Having decided to pass the river by our left, strong demonstrations were made upon our right to confirm the enemy in the impression that the movement was to be made in that direction, and that we would attempt to cross the river at some point below the mouth of Nickajack Creek. The points selected for the crossing were at Roswell Factory and Phillips' (Isham's) Ferry, and the Army of the Tennessee, which had been demonstrating upon our right, was suddenly thrown to Roswell, where it crossed the Chattahoochee upon a trestle bridge, built by the pioneers of the Sixteenth Army Corps out of the materials at hand. No opposition was made by the enemy. The Army of the Ohio, which had been on the left, now become the center, made a rapid movement across the river at Phillips' Ferry, surprising a small force of the enemy stationed there, and c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
ed here was from the enemy's artillery with canister. Our artillery did not come up till the next day, nearly twenty-four hours after the fight. My front lines maintained their position at the lines of these pits and fortified during the night. Colonel Taylor's brigade soon came into position on my left. The loss in my command during these last two days was 90 killed and wounded. Among the latter were Captain Brinton, my acting assistant adjutant-general, severely wounded in his arm; Major Phillips, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, arm off; Captain Fellows and Captain Taylor, Eighty-fourth Indiana, all fell bravely at their posts. September 3, no change in position to-day, but much firing at each other's lines, with some casualties; remained so until the morning of September 5, then twenty-six miles east of south of Atlanta, in front of Lovejoy's, a station on the Macon railroad, seventy-five miles from the latter place, when orders were received announcing that the campaign had ende
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 28 (search)
the pits filled up. In this affair we captured 26 prisoners, including 2 commissioned officers, having sustained a loss of but 2 wounded. In order to distract the enemy's attention from a real attack to be made by the right of our army, on the 5th day of August I again received orders to attack and drive him from his rifle-pits in my front. For this purpose I strengthened the skirmish line with five companies of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Veteran Infantry, under the command of Major Phillips. The artillery along our line opened furiously, and the enemy, evidently suspecting our intentions, were seen to heavily re-enforce their outer line. At the hour designated our skirmishers moved resolutely forward under a galling fire, but without the slightest hesitation or wavering they captured the pits, which they found so near the enemy's main line as to render an attempt to hold them out of the question, and they therefore withdrew at once. In this attack the brigade lost 36 men
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
n the march and in battle of both officers and men was in the highest degree commendable. Capt. Charles M. Barnett, chief of artillery, proved himself a skillful and energetic officer by his excellent management of his batteries throughout the campaign. Captain Gardner and Lieutenant Coe, battery commanders, performed their duties ably and efficiently. Their batteries are among the best in the service. To my staff-consisting of Capt. T. W. Morrison, assistant adjutant-general; Maj. John H. Phillips, medical director; Thomas H. Daily, captain and aide-de-camp; Lieut. Thomas J. Carney, aidede-camp; Capt. James L. Orr, commissary of subsistence; Capt. J. E. Remington, assistant quartermaster; Capt. Leonidas A. Cole, commissary of musters; Capt. Charles M. Barnett, chief of artillery; Capt. Hamilton W. Hall, inspector; Capt. John F. Squier, provostmarshal; Lieut. John Paul Kuntze, topographical engineer; Lieut. George Scroggs, ordnance officer — I am again under obligations for the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
dquarters, Samuel B. Thompson, teamster Div. Train. Co. M. Corporal Jacob C. Lewis, Private William Berry, Div. Provost Guard, Private Vince T. Hawthorn, William L Morse. [80] Twelfth Alabama Regiment. Co. A. Private John Arnold, John Ford, Reuben Popewell, Private Thomas S. Hazzard, Det'd Shoemaker. Co. B. Sergeant George W. Thomas, Private William B. Hardagree, Richard H. Corley, Det'd Thomas Jacobs, Div. Provost Guard, Oliver P. Looney, Corporal John H. Phillips, John McKay, teamster, Private Robert L. Goodgame, John O. McPherson, David C. Hogan, Robert H. J. Mallory, James W. Hollinshaw, Benjamin F. Pinson. Co. C. Sergeant Calvin Hoyt, Private Reuben C. Edwards, Anderson McGraw, John G. Williams, Private William T. Walker, Robert Esterheld, Div. Com. Department. Co. D. Corporal Wade H. Cardwell, Private James M. Buzby, Henry R. Cook, Private James P. McClenny, Jessey Pritchett, Robert Turner. Co. E.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
r. Daniel S. Patterson of Company K, who lives at Montgomery, Ala. The post-offices of the others are not known to me, and I deeply regret that I cannot put them in this list. Those who surrendered, as given in this book of Paroles, are as follows: Twelfth Alabama regiment. Company A. Privates: John Arnold, T. S. Hazzard, detailed shoemaker, John Ford, Reuben Popewell. Company B. Sergeants: George W. Thomas, Richard H. Corley, detailed division Provost Guard. Corporal John H. Phillips. Privates: Robert L. Goodgame, David C. Hogan, James W. Hollinshaw, William B. Hardagree, Thomas Jacobs, Oliver P. Looney, John McKay, teamster, John O. McPherson, Robert H. J. Mallory, Benjamin F. Pinson. Company C. Sergeant Calvin Hoyt. Privates: Reuben C. Edwards, Anderson McGraw, John G. Williams, William T. Walker, Robert Esterheld, division commissary department. Company D. Corporal Wade H. Cardwell. Privates: James M. Buzby, Henry R. Cook, James P. McClenny, J