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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 116 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 21 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 15 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Statement of General J. D. Imboden. (search)
ds in which, as an item of hews, I saw it stated that Brigadier-General Gideon J. Pillow had been appointed General Winder's successor. GenerGeneral Pillow was then at Macon, but had received no official notification of his appointment, and I having none, could not, and did not, recognizrs, I went to Macon to confer with General Howell Cobb and General Gideon J. Pillow as to the proper course for me to pursue in the event of ossion of the situation, there was perfect accord in our views. General Pillow was expecting to receive official notice of his appointment as , and acting harmoniously in whatever course might be adopted. General Pillow took a leading part in the discussion, and in shaping the concl. In view of all these facts and considerations, Generals Cobb and Pillow and I were of one mind that the best thing that could be done was, e point was Andersonville. Again conferring with Generals Cobb and Pillow, and finding we were powerless to prevent Wilson's reaching Anderso
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
h to march to their assistance with less than 5000 men, well appointed, and a full complement of artillery! By order of General Polk, made at the earnest personal solicitation of Governor Jackson, who had gone to Memphis for that purpose, General Pillow moved into Missouri from Tennessee, with twelve thousand men, and occupied New Madrid on the 28th of July, with the intent to unite in the effort to repossess the State. On the same day, Price, McCulloch, and Pearce, relying upon the cooperation of both Hardee and Pillow, concentrated their forces at Cassville, within about fifty miles of Springfield. There Price was reinforced by General McBride's command, consisting of two regiments of foot and three companies of mounted men, about 700 in all. They had come from the hill country lying to the south and south-east of Springfield, and were a unique body of soldiers. Very few of the officers had any knowledge whatever of military principles or practices, and only the most superf
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
to the States of Kentucky and Tennessee to observe the situation of the enemy, ascertain his strength and probable plans, and make rough maps of important localities occupied by troops or likely to be. Five days after my arrival, hearing that Pillow was moving upon Cairo, I left St. Louis for that place, with all my available force, 3800 men. I distributed my command over a transport fleet of eight large steamboats, in order to create in the enemy an impression of greater strength than I postals. Before the sun went down the greater number of the sick were carried to one of the roomiest boats, thus securing good ventilation and perfect drainage. The sudden relief of Cairo and the exaggerated form in which the news of it reached Pillow had the intended effect. He abandoned his proposed attack, and gave time to put it effectually beyond reach of the enemy, and eventually to secure a firm hold on the whole of that important district. Having secured the initial point in my ca
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., General Polk and the battle of Belmont. (search)
t.-Col. H. E. Hart, and 7th Iowa, Col. J. G. Lauman,--the whole command numbering 3114 men. The gun-boats Tyler, Capt. Henry Walke, and Lexington, Capt. R. N. Stembel, also bore a part in the engagement. The loss sustained by the Union troops, according to the revised official returns, was 120 killed, 383 wounded, and 104 captured or missing,--total, 607. The navy lost 1 killed and 2 wounded. The superior officer on the Confederate side was Maj.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, with Brig.-Gens. G. J. Pillow and B. F. Cheatham in subordinate command. The troops under them immediately engaged consisted of the 13th Arkansas, Col. James C. Tappan; 11th Louisiana, Col. S. F. Marks (commanding brigade), Lieut.-Col. R. H. Barrow; Blythe's Mississippi, Col. A. K. Blythe; 2d Tennessee, Col. J. Knox Walker (commanding brigade), Lieut.-Col. W. B. Ross; 12th Tennessee, Col. R. M. Russell (commanding brigade), Lieut.-Col. T. H. Bell; 13th Tennessee, Col. John V. Wright; 15th Tennessee, Maj. J. W.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The defense of Fort Henry. (search)
the lowest. To oppose this force General Tilghman had less than four thousand men,--mostly raw regiments armed with shot-guns and hunting-rifles; in fact, the best-equipped regiment of his command, the 10th Tennessee, was armed with old flint-lock Tower of London muskets that had done the state some service in the war of 1812. The general opinion and final decision was that successful resistance to such an overwhelming force was an impossibility, that the army must fall back and unite with Pillow and Buckner at Fort Donelson. General Tilghman, recognizing the difficulty of withdrawing undisciplined troops from the front of an active and superior opponent, turned to me with the question, Can you hold out for one hour against a determined attack? I replied that I could. Well, then, gentlemen, rejoin your commands and hold them in readiness for instant motion. The garrison left at the fort to cover the withdrawal consisted of part of Company.B, 1st Tennessee Artillery, Lieutenant Wat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
three chiefs of brigade — John B. Floyd, Gideon J. Pillow, and Simon B. Buckner. Of these, the fir set about the final preparation. Brigadier-General Pillow reached Fort Donelson on the 9th; Brithe enemy's left, where he would be opposed to Pillow. a little before dawn Birge's sharp-shootethe order was countermanded at the instance of Pillow. Then came the battle with the gun-boats. in the forts, and with his command to support Pillow by assailing the right of the enemy's center. ther was so short that the action began before Pillow could effect a deployment. His brigades came which had been the scene of the combat between Pillow and McClernand. If only on account of the res Their Zouave practice proved of Major-General Gideon J. Pillow, C. S. A. From a photograph. excel possible for them. both Generals Floyd and Pillow acquiesced in the opinion. Ordinarily the cousion as the steamers could carry away. General Pillow then remarked that there were no two perso[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
the Union forces (army and navy) was 510 killed, 2152 wounded, 224 captured or missing = 2886. Composition and losses of the Confederate army. 1 Brig.-Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, 2 Brig-Gen. John B. Floyd, 3 Brig-Gen. Simon B. Buckner (c). Buckner's division. Second Brigade, Col. Wm. E. Baldwin: 2d Ken., Col. R. W. Hanson; 's Company Tennessee. Unattached. Tennessee Battalion Infantry, Major S. H. Colms. The total loss of the Confederate army is not definitely stated. General Gideon J. Pillow says, in his report, that in killed and wounded it was about two thousand. With regard to the number of Confederates captured, General Grant says in hise replied that he could not tell with any degree of accuracy; that all the sick and weak had been sent to Nashville while we were about Fort Henry; that Floyd and Pillow had left during the night, taking many men with them; and that Forrest, and probably others, had also escaped during the preceding night; the number of casualties
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
the artillery. In the mean time our storming party had reached the crest of Cerro Gordo, and, seeing their whole left turned and the position of our soldiers on the Jalapa road, they broke and fled. Those in the pass laid down their arms. General Pillow's attack on their right failed. All their cannon, arms, ammunition, and most of their men fell into our hands. The papers can not tell you what a horrible sight a field of battle is, nor will I, owing to my accompanying General Twiggs's dive Potomac, was aid-de-camp to General John E. Wool. George H. Thomas was second lieutenant, Third Artillery, and was brevetted three times for gallantry; Joseph Hooker was assistant adjutant general on the staff of General Persifor F. Smith; Gideon J. Pillow was brevetted three times. Ambrose E. Burnside joined the army on its march, with some recruits. Winfield Scott Hancock was there as second lieutenant, Sixth Infantry, twenty-three years of age, and was brevetted for his conduct at Contrer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
division, Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen.-: Daniel W. Adams (w), Col. Randall L. Gibson: 32d Ala., Lieut.-Col. Henry Maury (wa, Col. Alexander McKinstry; 13th and 20th La., Col. Randall L. Gibson, Maj. Charles Guillet; 16th and 25th La., Col. S. W. Fisk (k), Maj. F. C. Zacharie; 14th La. Battalion, Maj. J. E. Austin; 5th Battery Washington (La.) Art'y, Lieut. W. C. D. Vaught. Brigade loss: k, 112; w, 445; m, 146 = 703. Second Brigade, Col. J. B. Palmer, Brig.-Gen. Gideon J. Pillow: 18th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. W. R. Butler, Col. J. B. Palmer (w); 26th Tenn., Col. John M. Lillard; 28th Tenn., Col. P. D. Cunningham (k); 45th Tenn., Col. A. Searcy; Ga. Battery (Moses's), Lieut. X. W. Anderson. Brigade loss: k, 49; w, 324; m, 52 = 425. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Preston: 1st and 3d Fla., Col. William Miller (w); 4th Fla., Col. William L. L. Bowen; 60th N. C., Col. J. A. McDowell; 20th Tenn., Col. T. B. Smith (w), Lieut.-Col. F. M. Lavender, Maj. F. Claybrook
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Stone's River. (search)
line was formed by placing Hanson's brigade of Kentuckians, who had thus far borne no part in the engagement, on the extreme left, supported by Adams's brigade, now commanded by Colonel Gibson. The Confederate Palmer's brigade, commanded by General Pillow, took the right of the line, with Preston in reserve. The artillery was ordered to follow the attack and go into position on the summit of the slope when Beatty should be driven from it. The total strength of the assaulting column was estimase to the river bank, with orders to fire once, then charge with the bayonet. On the right of Beatty was Colonel S. W. Price's brigade, and the charge made by Hanson's 6th Kentucky was met by Price's 8th Kentucky regiment, followed by Hanson and Pillow in successive strokes from right to left of Beatty's line. Overborne by numerical strength, the Union brigades of Price and Fyffe were forced back upon Grider, in reserve, the right of whose brigade was rapidly being turned by Hanson, threatenin
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