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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 31: the Chinese-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. (search)
a vast mass of crude, conflicting information, such as must come from rumors collected by men in hiding. But its most singular and most romantic aspect was the well-known fact, that many women essayed the breaking of the border blockade. Almost all of them were successful; more than one well nigh invaluable, for the information she brought, sewed in her riding-habit, or coiled in her hair. Nor were these coarse camp-women, or reckless adventurers. Belle Boyd's name became historic as Moll Pitcher; but others are recalled --petted belles in the society of Baltimore, Washington and Virginia summer resorts of yore — who rode through night and peril alike, to carry tidings of cheer home and bring back news that woman may best acquire. New York, Baltimore and Washington to-day boast of three beautiful and gifted women, high in their social ranks, who could — if they would-recite tales of lonely race and perilous adventure, to raise the hair of the budding beaux about them. But it
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
yss, and the Mss. diary of Wood have been carefully examined in preparation of these figures, but inaccuracies, confusions of titles of acted and printed plays, difficulty of deciding in all cases as to the nationality of the playwright, etc., make the statements only relatively exact. but they show at least the wide activity of our early playwrights notwithstanding the difficulties under which they laboured, and to which one of them so vigorously refers. See Letter from the author in Moll Pitcher, by Joseph S. Jones (1855). Of greatest distinction as literature are the tragedies. About eighty of these were performed, forty of which are extant, and they belong usually to the type known as romantic tragedy. In many cases there is an additional historical interest. Among those dealing with ancient history the most significant are Payne's Brutus (1818), Bird's Gladiator (1831), David Paul Brown's Sertorius, the Roman Patriot, acted by the elder Booth in 1830, and Waldimar by Jo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Mirabeau, 91 Miscellaneous poems an Divers occasions, etc., 166 n. Miscellanies (Tudor), 240 Miscellanies (Verplanck, Bryant, and Sands), 240 Mitchell [manager of the Olympic Theatre], 229 Mitchell [manager of the Olympic Theatre], Isaac, 292 Mitchill, Samuel Latham, 237, 288 Mitford, Mary Russell, 318 Moby Dick, 322-323 Mocha Dick, 322, 322 n. Modern Chivalry, 286-287 Modest inquiry into the nature and necessity of paper Currency, 95 Mohammed, 224 Moll Pitcher, 224 n. Moore, Thomas, 236, 243, 248, 255, 279, 281 Monikins, the, 302 Monitor, the, 117, 120 Montaigne, 12, 109, 187, 188, 208 Monterey, 280 Montesquieu, 119 Monthly magazine, the, 291 Monument of Phaon, the, 181 Monumental memorial of a late voyage, etc., A, 9 Morals of Chess, the, 101 More, Henry, 70 n. Morris, Colonel G. P., 241, 279 Morris, William, 261 Morse, Jedidiah, 187 Morse, S. F. B., 301 Morton, Nathaniel, 20, 22, 23, 27 Morton, Sara
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
ier edited the American Manufacturer, the Haverhill Gazette, and the Hartford, Conn., New England weekly Review, also contributing to John Neal's magazine, The Yankee, and afterward editing the Pennsylvania Freeman. He at first contributed most of his literary work to the National era of Washington, D. C., an important anti-slavery paper, but after the establishment of the Atlantic monthly he wrote mainly for that. Some of his works are Legends of New England in prose and verse (1831); Moll Pitcher (1832); Poems, chiefly Relating to slavery (1838); Ballads (1838); Lays of my home, and other poems (1843); Voices of freedom (1849); Songs of labor and other poems (1850); The Chapel of the Hermits, and other poems (1853); A Sabbath scene (1853); The Panorama, and other poems (1856); Home ballads (1860); In War time, and other poems (1863); Snow bound (1866); The Tent on the Beach, and other poems (1867); Among the Hills, and other poems (1868); Miriam, and other poems (1870); The Pennsy
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
and he thought seriously of standing for an election to Congress in 1832 but gave up the idea because he would, at the time of the election, be a few weeks short of the legal age requirement. When he identified himself, the next year, with the unpopular cause of the abolitionists, he gave up all hopes of political advancement. Whittier's first published book was entitled Legends of New England, in prose and verse. It appeared in 1831, and was followed in 1832 by a pamphlet containing Moll Pitcher. Both these publications he afterwards did his best to suppress. Reform still appealed to him even more than poetry, and he wrote upon one occasion: I set a higher value on my name as appended to the Antislavery Declaration of 1833 than on the title-page of any book. This Declaration was issued by the Convention held in Philadelphia, in 1833, to which Whittier was a delegate. In taking this momentous decision, he builded better than he knew, for the poet in him was aroused, and the V
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
other sketches, 389 Minister's Wooing, the, 200 Minor, Benjamin Blake, 169 Minot, George Richards, 106 Mirror (N. Y.), 151, 152, 164, 187 Miss Lucinda, 373 Miss Tempy's Watchers, 383 Mr. Dooley, 151 Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe, 23 Mr. Hosea Biglow to the Editor of The Atlantic monthly, 287 Mr. Rabbit at Home, 350 Mitchell, D. G., 167 Mitchell, S. Weir, 242, 282, 285 Modern English grammar, 365 Mogg Megone, 46 Moliere, 234 Moll Flanders, 396 Moll Pitcher, 345 Monroe, James, 119 Monsieur Motte, 390 Montaigne, 229, 234, 236, 258 Montcalm, 11 Montesquieu, 126 Monthly Anthology, the, 162, 162 n., 163 Monthly magazine and American review, the, 161 Moore, Clement C., 408 Moore, Frank, 298, 299 Moore, Thomas, 57, 66, 230 Moral uses of dark things, 213 More, Hannah, 367, 397, 399 Morgan, Gen. J. H., 306 Morituri Salutamus, 40 Morris, George P., 152 Morris, Wm., 245, 254 Morse, Jedidiah, 115 Morse, S.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 2: school days and early ventures (search)
of ill health has kept me at home. I have scarcely done anything this winter. There have been few days in which I have been able to write with any degree of comfort. I have indeed thrown together a poem of some length, the title of which ( Moll Pitcher ) has very little connection with the subject. This poem I handed to a friend of mine, and he has threatened to publish it. It will not have the advantage or disadvantage of my name, however. I have also written, or rather begun to write, a ing inconsistent in the character of a poet and modern politician. People of the present day seem to have ideas similar to those of that old churl of a Plato, who was for banishing all poets from his perfect republic. Pickard, pp. 100-2. Moll Pitcher was published (Boston, 1832) anonymously, and again, but this time with his name, eight years later, together with The minstrel girl (Philadelphia, 1840). Neither of these has been included in his collected works. No American poet whose fame
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 11: early loves and love poetry (search)
her were frequent, all written in a brotherly tone, and giving the gossip of Haverhill. In one letter, written in 1832, he refers to his just published poem, Moll Pitcher, and says he has in it drawn a portrait of herself. This portrait may be found on pages 26, 27, of the poem, and it is probable that the reason why Moll PitchMoll Pitcher does not appear in any collection of his works is that he used several passages of it in other and later poems. Thus, the first stanza of Memories is copied almost verbatim from these lines in Moll Pitcher : A beautiful and sylph-like girl, With step as soft as summer air- With fresh, young lip and brow of pearl, Shadowed by Moll Pitcher : A beautiful and sylph-like girl, With step as soft as summer air- With fresh, young lip and brow of pearl, Shadowed by many a natural curl Of unconfined and flowing hair-- With the moist eye of pitying care, Is bending like a seraph there: A seeming child in everything Save in her ripening maiden charms; As nature wears the smile of spring, When sinking into summer's arms. It will be noticed that the person described in Memories is remembered