Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Polk or search for Polk in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Confederate States Navy. (search)
s then held by the Confederate forces under General Polk. The battle of Belmont had just been foughrates had at Columbus, the Manassas, McRae (8), Polk (5), Jackson (2), and Calhoun (2). A small forts the first boat under way, and followed by the Polk and Pontchartrain, thundered away at the Yanks., of the gun-boats Pontchartrain, Maurapas and Polk, begged Commodore Hollins to allow them to attaw, I found Commander Pinkney with the gun-boats Polk and Livingston. He gave me command of two heavuff four miles below Randolph. The guns of the Polk and Livingston had been placed in batteries on they did efficient service. The Livingston and Polk succeeded in getting up the Yazoo river to Liver attention was soon attracted to the gun-boats Polk and Livingston, moored just below the obstructi fire, and she too was added to the loss of the Polk and Livingston. The following day I was sent more than he did with the Arkansas alone. The Polk and the Livingston had been well protected with[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
orthern Presidents. Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Jackson, served each eight years, forty years in all, just one-half the life of the nation. Tyler, Polk, Lincoln and Johnson, served each four years, and Taylor one. Of the twenty-three years under Northern Presidents, John and John Quincy Adams, Van Buren, Pierce a Democrat. On the other hand, five Southern Presidents were re-elected, and all of them were succeeded by Presidents of the same political faith, except perhaps Mr. Polk, who was succeeded by General Taylor, running upon a no party platform. The country endorsed Polk's administration and did not repudiate him, as he declined a rPolk's administration and did not repudiate him, as he declined a renomination. Another curious fact is this, that every Northern President had associated with him a Southern man as Vice-President. Thus John Adams had Thomas Jefferson; John Quincy Adams had J. C. Calhoun; Martin Van Buren had R. M. Johnson; Pierce had Wm. R. King; Buchanan had J. C. Breckinridge. On the other hand, Jackson ser
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
any Federal commander than General Thomas' defence of Nashville. We note with pleasure the dignified rebuke with which Mr. Van Horne censures the devastation of South Carolina by General Sherman. There is a wide difference between the sympathies of Chaplain Van Horne and our own regarding the war and its leading actors, and it will be excused in us to feel that he is sometimes too pronounced in his admiration of his heroes, and that occasionally, as in the cases of Mr. Davis and of General Polk, he shows too strongly his partisan feelings. But he has brought to the work he has so well accomplished an earnest purpose to write history from the most authentic documents attainable. He is generally fair in his statements of forces, though he does much overstate ours in the Battle of Chickamauga. He has adopted the plan throughout the work of having an appendix to every chapter, made up of official letters, orders and dispatches in support of the narrative contained in the ch