hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 28 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 18 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 12 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for Pond or search for Pond in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

randsons drove the cows there and gathered wild rose leaves for distilling. Old residents remember a small, round pond, with an island and solitary pine tree, just beyond Cedar street on the left. John Tufts set out the pine tree, it is said, and the place was a playground for the boys of the neighborhood. As is often the case, at one time they wished to build a fire. The tree was still small, and, with unusual thoughtfulness, they inverted a barrel over it to protect it from the heat. Pond, tree, and island are now things of the past, and looking at the spot, now built over with houses, it is difficult to see where a local poet drew his inspiration for the following poem, one of many dainty productions from the pen of a lifelong resident of Somerville, nearly, Lewis C. Flanagan:— Pine Island Pond. Tis even so; within our city's bounds We have a pond; not one with bottom paved And edges curbed with stone, but rough and plain From Nature's hand; nor large, nor deep, yet still