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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 1 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
63 (concerning the fall of Vicksburg and operations on the river), are marked thus*. Flag-ship Black Hawk (3d rate). *Lieutenant-Commander, K. R. Breese; Fleet-Surgeon, Ninian Pinkney; Assistant Surgeon, J. C. Bertolette; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. H. Sells; Ensigns, W. B. Bridgeman, Merrill Miller, S. H. Hunt and G. M. Brown; Acting Ensigns, G. D. Gove, W. Wardrop, E. Wv. Clark, R. R. Hubbell and D. P. Rosenmiller; Acting-Master's Mates, F. J. Turner, P. H. Brown, James DeCamp, C. H. Porter and F. D. Campbell; Engineers. G. W. Walker, O. G. Ritchie, A. P. Sutherland and Frandford Shepard. Iron-clad steamer Louisville (4th rate). *Lieutenant-Commander, E. K. Owen; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. D. Hoffman; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, D. L. Ruth; Acting-Ensigns, F. Bates; J. T. Blackford, J. G. Waters and S. M. B. Servos; Acting-Master's Mate, H. D. Coffenberry; Engineers, J. B. Fulton, A. W. Hardy. C. W. Reynolds and C. W. Degelman; Acting-Gunner, Wm. Shields, Acting-Car
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
e been closely besieging Port Hudson. For what purpose he marched no one could ever discern, for the gun-boats under Admiral Porter had arrived there before him, taken possession of and destroyed the defences along the river, and opened it so thorouher. He also, a short time after, destroyed two other steamers, the Diana and Hart. Farragut was relieved by Acting-Rear-Admiral Porter at the mouth of the Red River, May 7th, 1863, and crossing overland, joined his squadron below Port Hudson. Heveport. All idea of fortifying Alexandria was abandoned and two or three days afterwards the place surrendered to Rear-Admiral Porter without any resistance. On Farragut's arrival below Port Hudson he again commenced operations against that plact is doubtful whether Butler or Banks could have held their positions for a month. After the fall of Vicksburg, Rear-Admiral Porter descended the Mississippi as far as New Orleans, where the command of the entire river and all its tributaries was
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 5., Medford Historical Society, Seventh year, 1902-1903. (search)
Medford Historical Society, Seventh year, 1902-1903. October 20.—Time-keeping in a Medford Home two hundred Years Ago. Mr. John Albree, Jr., Swampscott, and Social Meeting. November 17.—Medford in 1847. Mr. Charles Cummings. December 15.—The Middlesex Canal. (Illustrated.) Mr. Moses W. Mann. January 19.—The Environment and Tendencies of Colonial Life. (Illustrated.) Rev. George M. Bodge of Westwood. February 16.—The Baptist Church of Medford. Mrs. Amanda H. Plummer. March 16.—Annual Meeting. April 20.—Rev. John Pierpont: His Life and Work. Rev. Henry C. DeLong. May 18.—The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War. Hon. C. H. Porter of Quincy. Committee on Papers and Addresses. David H. Brown. Walter H. Cushing. Charles H. Morss. John H. Hooper. William Cushing Wait. Miss A
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
ussell Leary died November 24, 1902, at her temporary home in Hartford, Ct. She was born in South Hadley, August 16, 1838, and was a descendant of Rev. John Russell, one of the earliest settlers of that town. In her death we realize the loss of a patriotic, loyal-hearted woman, who was interested in the past and present of Medford. Almost from its beginning she was one of the most devoted members of the Medford Historical Society. Notes. At the January meeting of the society, Hon. C. H. Porter, of Quincy, gave an address, entitled The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War. From personal observation, careful study of official reports and the writings of various commanders, he was able to give his hearers a vivid account of the movements of the regiment from the time of its organization until the victory before Richmond. The Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy M