hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 221 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 190 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 505 results in 35 document sections:

1 2 3 4
road expanse of our country. Please present my kind regards to Mrs. Porter and Mrs. Holbrook, and believe me, very truly your friend, A. S. Johnston. To Major F. J. Porter, no. 66 Union Place, New York City. San Francisco, California, April 9, 1861. My dear son: Yesterday the newspapers of this city announced that Texas ha remain, ever yours, F. J. Porter, Assistant Adjutant-General. To General A. S. Johnston, San Francisco, California. The following letter, addressed to Major Porter by an officer, then and since very prominent in the United States Army, needs no comment: Washington, May 10, 1861. dear Porter: General Johnston has resigPorter: General Johnston has resigned. He did so, April 9, 1861! Sumner's orders were not known here till near that time. He left Washington April 1st. Johnston asked that a successor might be sent to relieve him I His letter did not show that he had any idea that he was suspected, or that any one was sent to relieve him-says that he has heard that Johnston has
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
edgwick; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions: Porter, Hooker, and Hamilton; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Dhe headquarters and the divisions of Franklin, Porter, Sykes, and Smith reached Cumberland Landing; and terrible roads, the divisions of Franklin, Porter, and Smith were advanced to White House, and acticable to pursue the enemy or to move either Porter or Franklin to the support of the other Corps many troops as they could spare in support of Porter on the next day. All of them thought the enemygher reached the field before dusk, just after Porter's Corps had been forced by superior numbers topositions about to be abandoned by Keyes's and Porter's Corps. Meanwhile Slocum's division had been its artillery and trains, early on the 30th. Porter was ordered to follow this movement and prolonhed Malvern, about 4 P. M., the enemy attacked Porter's Corps, but were promptly shaken off. thus Sumner's and Heintzelman's Corps to reenforce Porter and Couch; fresh batteries were moved forward [14 more...]<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
part of the night in the immediate vicinity of Porter's corps, and from nearly every point of the cooint order, addressed to Generals McDowell and Porter, This joint order refers to the one just cis made by King's division near sunset; but, as Porter made no movement whatever toward the field, Loard on their right and front by the advance of Porter's troops much of the day. In consequence of hio far to the front for battle, he directed General Porter before leaving him to put his corps into t the right and go into the battle there. Upon Porter remarking that he could not go in there withouming on Jackson's right until he had dislodged Porter, which would have occupied him too long to havsserted nor successfully maintained. Whatever Porter supposed to be Longstreet's position, however,propriety of going into the battle. Certainly Porter did not know at that time that Longstreet was a severe battle on our left, utterly ignoring Porter and presenting his right flank to Porters atta[61 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
at Ashland, McClellan ordered General Sykes's division of regulars to move on the 28th from New Bridge to Hanover Court-House, to be in a position to support General Porter; and, during that and the following day, expeditions went out in various directions to destroy railway and other bridges, for the purpose of obstructing the pd, and destroyed a railway bridge and broke up the road and the telegraph in that vicinity. When these raids on the Confederate communications were accomplished, Porter withdrew to his camps with the main army, which was lying quietly on the Chickahominy, the extreme right being at Meadow Bridge. McClellan had again telegraphed to his superiors, telling of Porter's complete victories, speaking of the greater force than he expected before him, and of the risk he was running in moving at all, and declaring--I will do all that quick movements can accomplish, but you must send me all the troops you can, and leave to me full latitude as to choice of commander
e, General McClellan gave directions for strengthening the defences of Yorktown, so as to resist any attack from the direction of Richmond, and left General Keyes, with his corps, to perform the work and temporarily to garrison the place. On the evening of the 23d he sailed with his staff for Acquia Creek, where he arrived on the following morning and reported for orders. On the 26th he was ordered to Alexandria, and reached there the same day. In the mean time the corps of Heintzelman and Porter had sailed from Newport News and Yorktown, on the 19th, 20th, and 21st, to join General Pope's army; and those of Franklin and Sumner followed a day or two after. General McClellan remained at Alexandria till the close of the march. A brisk intercourse by telegraph was kept up between him and the commander-in-chief with reference to General Pope's movements and the defence of Washington; but no specific duty was assigned to him, and his brave army was by parcels detached from him, and se
the interview; and, at his earnest and reiterated request, General McClellan telegraphed to General Porter as follows : Washington, September 1, 1862. I ask of you, for my sake, that of the ll I can to render your retreat safe, should that become necessary. George B. Mcclellan. Major-General Porter. General Porter sent the following reply:-- Fairfax Court-House, 10 A. M., SepteGeneral Porter sent the following reply:-- Fairfax Court-House, 10 A. M., September 2, 1862. You may rest assured that all your friends, as well as every lover of his country, will ever give, as they have given, to General Pope their cordial co-operation and constant support of all orders and plans. Our killed, wounded, and enfeebled troops attest our devoted duty. F. J. Porter, Major-General. General George B. McClellan, Washington. It need hardly be said that Genllan's message, unexplained, is open to the obvious inference that he had some doubt whether General Porter and the troops under him would be faithful in the discharge of their duty to the nation and
s loss occurred at Gainesville, on the 28th. Hatch's McDowell's 47 168 44 259 80th New York 20th N. Y. S. M. Hatch's McDowell's 32 165 82 279 7th Wisconsin This loss occurred at Gainesville, on the 28th. Hatch's McDowell's 31 153 33 217 11th Pennsylvania Includes loss at Thoronghfare Gap on the 28th. Ricketts's McDowell's 44 114 88 246 24th New York Hatch's McDowell's 36 115 86 237 6th New Hampshire Reno's Ninth 30 117 70 217 1st Michigan Morell's F. J. Porter's Porter's regiments were small, having sustained heavy losses on the Peninsula; McDowell's regiments were in action for the first time. 33 114 31 178 18th Massachusetts Morell's F. J. Porter's 34 106 29 169 26th New York Ricketts's McDowell's 26 106 37 169 Richmond, Ky.             August 30, 1862.             12th Indiana Nelson's ---------- 25 148 608 781 18th Kentucky Nelson's ---------- 39 111 237 387 16th Indiana Nelson's ---------- 25 120 395 540 Chantilly, Va.  
862, 6.30 P. M., Bristow Station. Major-General F. J. Porter, Warrenton Junction: General: The Maquarters, sent to you yesterday through Major-General Porter. I am, General, very respectfully, ytzelman's.3d. Sigel's. 2d. McDowell's.4th. Porter's. All the supply and regimental trains wnear Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862--8 A. M. Major-Gen. Porter: General: McDowell has intercepted the rtreville, Aug. 29, 1862. Gens. Mcdowell and Porter: You will please move forward with your joint commands toward Gainesville. I sent Gen. Porter written orders to that effect an hour and a half aers in the field, Aug. 29--4.30 P. M. Major-Gen. Porter: Your line of march brings you in on thell Run, Aug. 29, 1962-8.50 P. M. Major--General F. J. Porter: General: Immediately upon receipt The army corps of Heintzelman, Sigel, Sumner, Porter, and Reno, as soon after daylight as possible,ward Fort Craig and Tillinghast. The corps of Porter, Sumner, and Sigel, via Vienna, toward the Cha[1 more...]
quarters, sent to you yesterday through Major-General Porter. I am, General, very respectfully, ytzelman's.3d. Sigel's. 2d. McDowell's.4th. Porter's. All the supply and regimental trains wnear Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862--8 A. M. Major-Gen. Porter: General: McDowell has intercepted the rtreville, Aug. 29, 1862. Gens. Mcdowell and Porter: You will please move forward with your joint commands toward Gainesville. I sent Gen. Porter written orders to that effect an hour and a half aers in the field, Aug. 29--4.30 P. M. Major-Gen. Porter: Your line of march brings you in on thell Run, Aug. 29, 1962-8.50 P. M. Major--General F. J. Porter: General: Immediately upon receipt The army corps of Heintzelman, Sigel, Sumner, Porter, and Reno, as soon after daylight as possible,ward Fort Craig and Tillinghast. The corps of Porter, Sumner, and Sigel, via Vienna, toward the Challow and cover the march of the three corps of Porter, Sumner, and Sigel; and Bayard the troops marc[1 more...]
led and their commendations earned. I also bear testimony to the efficient service in posting portions of the troops, and conducting them to the front and into action, rendered by the members of my staff present and on the field of battle, Colonel Porter, Captain John Newton, and Lieutenant Babcock, and Majors Price and Biddle, who were employed conveying orders, also Surgeon Tripler, in attention to the wounded. The loss of the enemy was over sixty in killed. The number of the wounded rded by a portion of its regiment. A strong rear guard will be detailed by the commander of the first division. The wagons must be kept closed up. Two regiments in all, from the third and fourth brigades, will be left as a guard to the public property in this town. The commanders of cavalry companies and sections of artillery will report to their brigade commanders to-night, and join them in the morning. By order of Major-General Patterson. F. J. Porter, Assistant Adjutant-General.
1 2 3 4