Your search returned 127 results in 33 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
o 1701 The Council1701 to 1702 Joseph Dudley1702 to 1715 The CouncilFeb. to March, 1715 Joseph DudleyMarch to Nov., 1715 William Tailer1715 to 1716 Samuel Shute1716 to 1723 William Dummer1723 to 1728 William BurnetJuly, 1728 to Sept., 1729 William Dummer1729 to June, 1730 William TailerJune to Aug., 1730 Jonathan Belcher1730 to 1741 William Shirley1741 to 1749 Spencer Phipps1749 to 1753 William Shirley1753 to 1756 Spencer Phipps1756 to 1757 The CouncilApril to Aug., 1757 Thomas Pownall1757 to 1760 Thomas HutchisonJune to Aug., 1760 Sir Francis Bernard1760 to 1769 Thomas Hutchinson1769 to 1771 Thomas Hutchinson1771 to 1774 The Council1774 to 1780 Governors under the State Constitution. Name.Party.Term. John Hancock1780 to 1785 James Bowdoin1785 to 1787 John Hancock1787 to Oct., 1793 Samuel Adams1793 to 1794 Samuel Adams1794 to 1797 Increase Sumner1797 to June, 1799 Moses Gill1799 to 1800 Caleb StrongFederal.1800 to 1807 James SullivanDem.-Rep.1807 to D
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parliament, English (search)
ere laid before it. The House of Lords severely denounced the public proceedings in Massachusetts. Approving the conduct of the ministry, they recommended instructions to the governor of Massachusetts to obtain full information of all treasons, and to send the offenders to England for trial, under an unrepealed statute of Henry VIII. for the punishment of treason committed out of the kingdom. These recommendations met powerful opposition in the House of Commons, in which Barre Burke, and Pownall took the lead. But Parliament, as a body, considered the proceedings in the colonies as indicative of a factious and rebellious spirit, and the recommendations of the House of Lords were adopted by a very decided majority; for each member seemed to consider himself insulted by the independent spirit of the Americans. Every man in England, wrote Franklin, regards himself as a piece of a sovereign over America—seems to jostle himself into the throne with the King, and talks of our subjects
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penobscot. (search)
in Acadia, sent a French manof-war to Penobscot and took possession of the Plymouth trading-house there, with all its goods. A vessel was sent from Plymouth to recover the property. The French fortified the place, and were so strongly intrenched that the expedition was abandoned. The Plymouth people never afterwards recovered their interest at Penobscot. The first permanent English occupation of the region of the Penobscot—to which the French laid claim—was acquired in 1759, when Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, with the consent of the legislature, caused a fort to be built on the western bank of the Penobscot (afterwards Fort Knox), near the village of Prospect, which was named Fort Pownall. An armed force from Massachusetts took possession of the region, built the fort, cut off the communications of the Eastern Indians (the only ones then hostile to the English), and so ended the contest for the Penobscot region by arms. In 1799 a British force of several hundred men fr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pepperell, Sir, William 1696-1759 (search)
y, Me., June 27, 1696. His father, a Welshman, came to New England as apprentice to a fisherman, where he married. The son became a merchant, amassed a large fortune, and became an influential man. Fitted by temperament for military life, he was frequently engaged against the Indians, and attained much distinction. About 1727 he was appointed one of his Majesty's council for the province of Massachusetts, and held the office, by re-election, thirty-two consecutive years. Appointed chiefjustice of common pleas in 1730, he be- Sir William Pepperell's House at Kittery, me. came eminent as a jurist. In 1745 he commanded the successful expedition against Louisburg, and was knighted. On visiting England in 1749, he was commissioned colonel in the British army; Sir William Pepperell. became major-general in 1755; and lieutenant-general in 1759. From 1756 to 1758 Sir William was acting governor of Massachusetts before the arrival of Pownall. He died in Kittery, Me., July 6, 1759.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pownall, Thomas 1720-1805 (search)
Pownall, Thomas 1720-1805 Statesman; born in Lincoln, England, in 1720; graduated at Cambridge in 1743, and was made secretary to the commissioners of trade and plantations in 1745. He came to g Parliament in 1768, he was one of the most powerful friends of the Americans in that body. Pownall, who, as governor of Massachusetts, and a traveller, explorer, and civil officer in the central Europe will nurse it insures its establishment beyond all doubt and danger. As early as 1760, Pownall, who had associated with liberal men while upholding the King's prerogative, many times said thcans was certain, and near at hand. On one occasion Hutchinson, who, eight years later, was in Pownall's official seat in Massachusetts, hearing of these remarks, exclaimed, Not for centuries! for ries! for he knew how strong was the affection of New England for the fatherland. He did not know how strong was the desire of the people for liberty. Pownall died in Bath, England, Feb. 25, 1805.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pownall, Fort, erection of (search)
Pownall, Fort, erection of Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, took possession of the country around the Penobscot River in 1759, and secured it by the erection of a fort there. It was done by 400 men granted by Massachusetts for the purpose, at a cost of about $15,000, and named Fort Pownall. Pownall, Fort, erection of Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, took possession of the country around the Penobscot River in 1759, and secured it by the erection of a fort there. It was done by 400 men granted by Massachusetts for the purpose, at a cost of about $15,000, and named Fort Pownall.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quincy, Josiah 1709-1784 (search)
Quincy, Josiah 1709-1784 Merchant; born in Braintree, Mass., in 1709; graduated at Harvard in 1728; appointed joint commissioner with Thomas Pownall, from Massachusetts, in 1755, to negotiate an alliance with New York and Pennsylvania against the French, and to erect Fort Ticonderoga as a defence against invasion from Canada. He died in Braintree in 1784. Patriot; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 23, 1744; third son of Josiah Quincy; graduated at Harvard College in 1763, and soon rose to distinction as a lawyer. He was fervent and influential as a speaker and writer. In 1770 he, with John Adams, defended Captain Preston. Ill-health compelled him to abandon all business. He made a voyage to Charleston in February, 1773, which gave him much benefit, but his constitution was permanently impaired. He took part in public affairs, speaking against British oppression fervidly and eloquently, until September, 1774, when he made a voyage to England. In London he labored incessant
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
Acadians, or French neutrals, at Grand Pre on the northwestern coast of Nova Scotia, are carried away and scattered among the English colonists......September, 1755 Governor Shirley, being recalled, sails for England......Sept. 25, 1756 Thomas Pownall appointed governor......Aug. 3, 1757 Sir William Pepperell commissioned lieutenant-general of the Massachusetts forces......1757 Louisburg again besieged and taken by the English......June 2–July 26, 1758 Governor Pownall succeeded bGovernor Pownall succeeded by Francis Bernard, who arrives at Boston......Aug. 3, 1760 Governor Bernard appoints Thomas Hutchinson chief-justice of Massachusetts......December, 1760 James Otis's speech against the Writs of assistance ......1761 [ American independence was then and there born. ] Dispute between Governor Bernard and the House of Representatives on the right of originating taxes......1761 James Otis publishes a pamphlet entitled A vindication of the conduct of the House of Representatives of
bserve the strength and numbers of the Indian nations. On the last day of October, Journals of Gist, printed by Thomas Pownall, in the Appendix to Thomas Pownall's Topographical Description of North America. the bold messenger of civilization pThomas Pownall's Topographical Description of North America. the bold messenger of civilization parted from the Potomac. He passed through snows over the stony and broken land of the Alleghanies; he halted among the twenty Delaware families that composed Shanoppin's town on the southeast side of the Ohio; swimming his horses across the river, hne meadow. Nothing, they cried, is wanting but cultivation to make this a most delightful country. Gist's Journal in Pownall's Appendix, 11. Their horses swam over the swollen current of the Great Miami; on a raft of logs they transported their l treaty with Virginia. Croghan's Journal of Transactions, &c. The indentures had just been exchanged, Gist in Pownall, 12, 13. when four Ottawas drew near with a present from the governor of Canada, were admitted at once to the council,
ave effect to the intimations of the Board of Trade. That Board, of itself, had as yet no access to the king; but still it assumed the direction of affairs in its department. Busily persevering in the plan of reforming the government of the colonies, it made one last great effort to conduct the American administration by means of the prerogative. New York remained the scene of the experiment, and Sir Danvers Os- chap. IV.} 1753. borne, brother-in-law to the Earl of Halifax, having Thomas Pownall for his secretary, was commissioned as its governor, with instructions which were principally advised Representation of Halifax and Townshend, &c 5 July, 1753. by Halifax and Charles Townshend, and were confirmed by the Privy Council, Order in Council, 10 August, 1753. in the presence of the king. The new governor, just as he was embarking, was also charged to apply his thoughts very closely to Indian affairs; Thomas Penn to James Hamilton, 12 August, 1753. and hardly had he
1 2 3 4