Your search returned 2,253 results in 565 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
Corps March and April, 1862. Hatch's Cavalry Brigade, Department of the Shenandoah, to June, 1862. Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Wyndham's Cavalry Brigade, Defenses of Washington, to February, 1863. Price's Independent Cavalry Brigade, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June 28, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Army of the S Near Tupelo July 14-15. Old Town or Tishamingo Creek July 15. Smith's Expedition to Oxford August 1-30. Hurricane Creek August 13-14. Moved to Duvall's Bluff, Ark., September 1-7. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 19. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 21-December 1. Battles of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. At Clifton, Tenn., and Eastport, Miss., till February, 1865. M
Headquarters 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Price's Cavalry Brigade, Military District of Washington, D. C., to March and duty there till February 24, 1862. Curtis' Campaign against Price in Missouri and Arkansas February-March. Battles of Pea Ridge, Ais' advance on Springfield, Mo., February 2-13. Campaign against Price in Missouri and Arkansas February and March. Battles of Pea Ridg-14. Expedition to Grand Junction September 20. Skirmish with Price and Van Dorn September 21. Battle of Metamora or Hatchie River O., June 26, and reported to General Davidson. Expedition against Price and Marmaduke in Arkansas. March to Clarendon, Ark., on White Ri, September 1. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 16. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 21, September 1. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 16. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 21
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Samuel D. Sturgis' Command, Military District of Washington, to August, 1862. Buford's Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Price's Cavalry Brigade, Defenses of Washington, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1863. Provost Guard, Army of ther to December, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., December 8, 1862. Attached to Wyndham's Cavalry Brigade, Defenses of Washington, to February, 1863. Price's Independent Cavalry Brigade, 22nd Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Corps, to June, 1863. 1st BrigadJuly 16-17. Smith's Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Hurricane Creek August 9. A detachment moved to Little Rock, Ark., and on expedition against Price, Nonconah Creek, November 20 (Co. F ). Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 26-December 3. Owen's Cross Roads December 1. Battle of Nashville December 15-
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Vermont Volunteers. (search)
1st Vermont Regiment Cavalry Organized at Burlington and mustered in November 19, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., December 14; thence moved to Annapolis, Md., December 25, and duty there till March, 1862. Attached to Banks' Division, Army of the Potomac, December, 1861, to March, 1862. Hatch's Cavalry Brigade, Banks' 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Dept. of the Shenandoah to June, 1862. Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Price's Cavalry Brigade, Defenses of Washington, and 22nd Army Corps to April, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1864, and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to June, 1865. Service. Moved to Washington, D. C., March 9-10, 1862; thence to Rockville, Md., and Edward's Ferry M
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
62. Shields' 2nd Division, Banks' 5th Corps, and Dept. of the Shenandoah to May, 1862 (8 Cos.). Milroy's Cheat Mountain District, W. Va., to June, 1862 (4 Cos.). Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862 (8 Cos.). Buford's Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862 (8 Cos.). Milroy's Independent Brigade, 1st Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862 (4 Cos.). Unassigned, Defenses of Washington, D. C., to February, 1863. Price's Cavalry Brigade, Defenses of Washington, D. C., and 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1863. Unassigned, Dept. of West Virginia, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, W. Va., to May, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, W. Va., to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, W. Va., to November, 1864. 2nd B
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
6 (Co. C ). Near Dogwood July 7. Osage Mission, Kan., September 26. Operations against Price in Missouri and Arkansas September to November, 1864. Lexington October 19 (Detachment). N. Defence of Fort Larned July 17, 18 and 19, 1863 (Left Section). Curtis' Campaign against Price in Missouri and Arkansas October, 1864. Big Blue and State Line October 22. Westport Octobgust 23 and 25. Expedition up White River to Brownsville, Ark., September 1-10. Pursuit of Price through Arkansas and Missouri September 17-November 16. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 2eptember 1, and to Brownsville September 8. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 17. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 23-30. Battle of Nashville Dr 1, and to Brownsville, Ark., September 8. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-November 16. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., thence to Nashville, Tenn., November 23-30
Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mosby. 72. General Joseph E. Johnston. 73. General Hood. 74. General Bragg. 75. Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith. 76. Major-General Price. 77. Major-General A. S. Johnson. 78. Major-General Hardee. 79. Major-General Forrest. 80. Major-General John Morgan. Battle scenes. 81. Battle of Gettysburg. 82. Capture of Lookout mountain. 83. battle of Chapin's farm. 84. Surrender of General Lee. 85. Interview between Generals Sherman and Johnston. 86. The scout. 87. Prisoners' camp at Andersoville, Georgia. 88. the great railroad raid. 89. Obstructing the train. 90. Mrs. Bickerdyke and the Unfaithful surgeon. 91.
eneral McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mosby. 72. General Joseph E. Johnston. 73. General Hood. 74. General Bragg. 75. Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith. 76. Major-General Price. 77. Major-General A. S. Johnson. 78. Major-General Hardee. 79. Major-General Forrest. 80. Major-General John Morgan.
n Wells by name, and living twelve miles south of St. Joseph, was to leave the next morning for Price's army with two wagon loads of goods and a coffin full of arms. The company started over immediknown and feared all over that country. On one of these, it was ascertained that Major Hart, of Price's army, was at his home, fifteen miles from Weston, with ten men. The company immediately set focommission in the secret service of the Confederate army, and signing to it the name of General Price, enclosed it in the bullet, screwed it up, and started on again. He had gone but a little way wat he had very little to say, bat he wished he would do him the favor to take that bullet to General Price after he had hung him. Gordon seemed much amused at so trifling a request, and said to his p spies for Lane and Sturgis's commands. On Christmas day, both were sent by General Steele into Price's camp, whither they went, and returned on January 3d, 1862. Four miles from Warsaw, they found
essful; our forces fought their way to the very centre of the town, but the strong works and terrific fire of the enemy forced them to retire at the very moment when victory seemed within their grasp. Our men, especially the Missourians, under Gen. Price, fought with unsurpassed bravery, and the blood of hundreds of the noblest and best enriches the ground on which Corinth stands. The Federals attempted to cut off the retreat of our army by throwing a heavy column to the south of Corinth, but the genius and experience of Gen. Price completely foiled their plans, and brought the shattered battalions of the South to a position where they could make a successful stand. The march of General Bragg from Mississippi into Tennessee, and the events that followed, are so well known that we need not do more than make such reference to them as may be essential in keeping up the thread of our narrative. The marching and maneuvering of both armies, Confederate and Federal, ended in the battl
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...