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e after this short but bloody engagement, it required but little more effort to rout the enemy's right wing. This was accomplished by suddenly throwing forward our left, which threw the enemy into such confusion that one whole brigade, under General Prince, was reduced to a crowd of fugitives, running they knew not whither. The attack of Banks had evidently failed, his centre and left were irreparably broken; while, to add to his confusion and dismay, our cannon on the hill-side, immediatelmore to be lamented from. the fact that it occurred while extricating the original Stonewall brigade from an awkward position to which it had been forced by the superior numbers of the enemy. Our men, however, had amply revenged his fall. General Prince, together with thirty commissioned officers, and upwards of three hundred other prisoners, had been marched to the rear and sent to Richmond. The officers, indeed, were handcuffed and treated in the exact manner prescribed for the rebels by
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 15: Cedar Run. (search)
mainder of the first and second brigades of Jackson's division were ordered by him to advance across the feld, throwing their left continually forward, and attack the enemy's line in the opposite wood. They advanced under a heavy fire, when the foe yielded the bloody field, and broke into full retreat. The brigade of Taliaferro also charged, bearing toward the right, and pierced the field of Indian corn in front of General Early, where they captured four hundred of the enemy, with Brigadier-General Prince. The two brigades which had hitherto remained with General Ewell upon the mountain now advanced also upon the right, turned the left flank of the Federalists, and captured one piece of artillery. Thus, at every point, the foe was repulsed, and hurled into full retreat. When night settled upon the field they had been driven two miles, Jackson urging on the pursuit with the fresh brigades of Stafford and Field. It was his cherished desire to penetrate to Culpepper Court House,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 18 (search)
on in Orange County. August 8 We hear of skirmishing in Orange County, and the enemy seem as familiar with the paths and fords as our own people; hence some surprises, attempted by our cavalry, have failed. August 9 Jackson and Ewell are waiting and watching. Pope will expose himself soon. August 10 Jackson struck Pope yesterday It was a terrible blow, for the numbers engaged. Several thousand of the enemy were killed, wounded, and taken prisoners. Among the latter is Gen. Prince, who arrived in this city this morning. He affected to be ignorant of Pope's brutal orders, and of the President's retaliatory order concerning the commissioned officers of Pope's army taken in battle. When Prince was informed that he and the fifty or sixty others taken with him were not to be treated as prisoners of war, but as felons, he vented his execrations upon Pope. They were sent into close confinement. August 11 Our killed, wounded, and captured did not amount to more th
rks of brush and logs to cover them. General French was determined to sustain the reputation of the old Third corps, and was not willing that any obstacles should retard its advance when it had received orders to move forward. He directed General Prince, commanding the Second division, to detail a brigade to charge this system of hills, commanding the debouch of the road, and dislodge the enemy. The famous Excelsior brigade was selected for this bold enterprise. The men were formed in liHe was a brave and gallant soldier, much beloved by his command. Lieutenant Preston, of the Fifth, who was also killed, was wounded at Chancellorsville. He had just returned to his command, his former wounds having but recently healed. General Prince, commanding the Second division, accompanied the Excelsior brigade in its charge, assuming the general direction of its movements. He would have pressed the noble brigade forward into Front Royal had he not been overtaken by a staff-officer,
ng this place soon after dark. Passing on about two miles we halted to feed, in the midst of a heavy rain, on the plantation of Mr. Williams. After feeding, Colonel Prince, of the Seventh Illinois cavalry, with two battalions, was sent immediately forward to Pearl River to secure the ferry and landing. He arrived in time, to caith the main column I followed in about two hours. We ferried and swam our horses, and succeeded in crossing the whole command by two o'clock P. M. As soon as Colonel Prince had crossed his two battalions, he was ordered to proceed immediately to the New-Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad, striking it at Hazlehurst. He, and the invaluable aid of my scouts, we were always able by rapid marches to evade the enemy when they were too strong, and whip them when not too large. Colonel Prince, commanding the Seventh Illinois, and Lieutenant-Colonel Loomis, commanding the Sixth Illinois, were untiring in their efforts to further the success of the e
the arm so that he will likely lose it, and Gen. Prince is slightly wounded. On Saturday eveningth his brigade, occupied the extreme left. Gen. Prince stood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, position of the batteries was discovered, General Prince, occupying the centre, advanced the One Huer, and advanced nearly in the same line as Gen. Prince. But the enemy outnumbered him five to onend their field-officers. The brigades of Gen. Prince and Gen. Geary fought with the most desperae formed of the losses of the brigades of Generals Prince, Geary, and Crawford. The number of men Various reports are in circulation about Gen. Prince. One is, that he was wounded, and taken priunded and a prisoner is probably correct. General Prince fought as if the success or failure of theave it. General Augur is severely wounded. Gen. Prince is missing. The whole of the right wing, ue over four hundred prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less than [3 more...]
the arm so that he will likely lose it, and Gen. Prince is slightly wounded. On Saturday eveningth his brigade, occupied the extreme left. Gen. Prince stood next, then Generals Geary, Crawford, position of the batteries was discovered, General Prince, occupying the centre, advanced the One Hue. Gen. Geary who occupied the right of General Prince, behaved in the most gallant manner, and advanced nearly in the same line as Gen. Prince. But the enemy outnumbered him five to one. In an nd their field-officers. The brigades of Gen. Prince and Gen. Geary fought with the most desperae formed of the losses of the brigades of Generals Prince, Geary, and Crawford. The number of men Various reports are in circulation about Gen. Prince. One is, that he was wounded, and taken priunded and a prisoner is probably correct. General Prince fought as if the success or failure of theave it. General Augur is severely wounded. Gen. Prince is missing. The whole of the right wing, u
Rebel reports and narratives. General Jackson's report. headquarters valley District, August 12--6 1/2 P. M. Colonel: On the evening of the ninth instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Court-House. The enemy, according to the statement of prisoners, consisted of Banks's, McDowell's, and Sigel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, yet we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded while ably discharging his duty at the head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms, and other ordnance stores. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A.G. Richmond Enquirer account. An intelligent corresponden
eld and along the road from Cedar Mountain to Orange Court-House. No material of war nor baggage-trains were lost on either side, but the loss of life on both sides were severe. Brig.-Gens. Geary, Augur and Carroll were badly wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Prince was captured by accident. Very many of our best field and company officers were killed or wounded. From the verbal reports and statements of General Banks and others, the Massachusetts regiments behaved with especial gallantry, and sustaiHe exposed himself as freely as any one under his command, and his example went far to secure that gallant and noble conduct which has made his corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantry. Gen. Prince, who had led his brigade throughout the action with coolness and courage, was captured after dark while passing from one flank of his command to the other. As I have not received any report from Gen. Banks, it is not in my power to mention th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, (search)
ur dead, and collecting arms, ammunition, &c., from the battle-field. Old Stonewall announced his victory by the following characteristic dispatch: August 11th--6 1/2 A. M. On the evening of the 9th instant God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Courthouse. The enemy, according to statements of prisoners, consisted of Banks's, McDowell's and Siegel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brigadier-General Prince. While our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. * * * We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms and other ordnance stores. On the morning of the 11th General Banks asked for a truce to enable him to bury his dead. The request was granted, and as Early's brigade on our side had charge of it, I had full opportunity of witnessing the scene, which was indeed a novel one. That night we d
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