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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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ld serve the high and noble purposes they had in mind for such an organization. After a long correspondence Chaplain Rutledge went to Springfield to consult with Major Stephenson and to read the rough draught that Major Stephenson had prepared. In March, 1866, a conference was held in that city. To this conference, under bonds of secrecy, they invited Colonel J. M. Snyder, Doctor James Hamilton, Major Robert M. Woods, Major Robert Alien, Colonel Martin Flood, Colonel Daniel Grass, Colonel Edward Prince, Captain John S. Phelps, Captain John A. Lightfoot, Colonel B. F. Smith, Major A. A. North, Captain Henry F. Howe, and Lieutenant B. F. Hawkes (since colonel). Captain John S. Phelps was so enthusiastic over the proposition that he worked untiringly with Major Stephenson in perfecting the ritual, charter, and by-laws for the order. It is possible that the name was suggested by an organization that bore the name of The Grand Army of progress which was then in existence. The prin
e with the design of attacking him, and ordered his detachment to retreat. While retreating they were fired on by the State troops, at an order given by a private; but their fire was so irregular they killed their own commander, Captain Holloway, and J. B. Clanahan, and severely wounded several more of their own men. Captain Stanley's men did notfire, they having received orders not to do so under any circumstances. Captain Stanley retreated to Kansas City and reported the affair, when Captain Prince, with a strong body of troops, attacked and routed the State forces, capturing thirty horses and a large quantity of baggage.--N. Y. Herald, June 20. Gen. Lyon left Jefferson City, Mo., for Booneville. He landed four miles below the town and opened a heavy cannonade against the rebels, who retreated and dispersed into an adjacent wood, whence, hidden by brushes and trees, they opened a brisk fire on our troops. General Lyon then ordered a hasty retreat to the boats; and the rebels
k place on the subject of enrolling free negroes for the rebel army. The bill amending the Convention Act for the enrolment of free negroes was, on motion of Mr. Prince, taken up. Among the amendments in this bill, Mr. Prince called attention to the one allowing ten cents for each negro so enrolled to the sheriff or officer so Mr. Prince called attention to the one allowing ten cents for each negro so enrolled to the sheriff or officer so enrolling them. He proposed to strike out this amendment, and insert in lieu of the proposed compensation that, if the said officers fail to comply with the requisition of this law, they be subjected to a penalty of not less than fifty nor more than one hundred dollars. As these officers were exempt from military duty, he said itilies of many of the free negroes so enlisted, having no other means of support, would — as had been the case in his own county — suffer very much from want. Mr. Prince agreed to compromise with the gentleman on one hundred and twenty days. Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, hoped that the amendment would not pass. One hundred and
off Tampa Bay, Florida, captured the rebel sloop Hancock. A battle took place near Bolivar, Tenn., between a party of rebel raiders belonging to the command of General Forrest, and five hundred of the Seventh Illinois cavalry, under Colonel Edward Prince, who had been sent out to scout and patrol the crossings on the Mississippi Central Railroad. Finding himself overpowered by numbers, Colonel Prince fell back on Summerville, with a loss of three killed and eight wounded. (Doc. 50.) Colonel Prince fell back on Summerville, with a loss of three killed and eight wounded. (Doc. 50.) The rebel House of Representatives, by a vote of four to one, resolved that a person otherwise liable to military duty shall no longer be exempt by reason of having provided a substitute. It declared also that the substitute should not be discharged, and rejected a proposition to refund to the principal any portion of the money paid for his substitute. --the enlistment of colored troops at Nashville, Tenn., continued with great success.--the ship Martaban, from Moulmein to Singapore, was captu
December 25. Colonel Prince again advanced upon the rebel forces under Forrest, and attacked them, but in a few moments discovered that he was surrounded on all sides. He did not surrender, but after fighting for three hours, with terrible loss, cut his way out, and carried most of his command safely into La Grange.--Colonel R. R. Livingston, of the First Nebraska cavalry, assumed command of the district of North-eastern Arkansas, headquarters at Batesville, and issued a proclamation in accordance therewith.--A correspondent of the Richmond Sentinel says: The plate that is in our country, and its value to the government, if the people can be induced to relinquish it, has doubtless occurred to many minds — been, perhaps, weighed and repudiated; but yet, I presume to think, might be made to act, if not a principal, a valuable subsidiary part in any well-digested scheme to restore the credit of the Treasury, to give stability to any system of finance, to arrest depreciation of con
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
el McCalla; 17th Iowa, Maj. Jabez Banbury; 10th Mo., Col. Samuel A. Holmes, Maj. Leonidas Horney; E, 24th Mo., Capt. Lafayette M. Rice; 80th Ohio, Maj. Richard Lanning (k), Capt. David Skeels; 6th Wis. Battery, Capt. Henry Dillon; 12th Wis. Battery, Lieut. Lorenzo D. Immell. Brigade loss: k, 34; w, 227; mi, 15 = 276. cavalry division, Col. John K. Mizner. (Division organized into two brigades, Col. Edward Hatch commanding the First and Col. Albert L. Lee the Second.) 7th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Edward Prince; 11th Ill., Col. Robert (G. Ingersoll; 2d Iowa, Maj. Datus E. Coon; 7th Kan., Lieut.-Col. T. P. Herrick; 3d Mich., Capt. Lyman G. Willcox; 5th Ohio (4 co's), Capt. Joseph C. Smith. Division loss: k, 5; w, 17; m, 14 = 36. unattached: 64th Ill. (Yates's Sharp-shooters), Capt. John Morrill; 1st U. S. (6 co's--siege artillery), Capt. G. A. Williams. Unattached loss: k, 16; w, 53; m, 15 = 84. Army of West Tennessee. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas A. Davies. First Brigade,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
el McCalla; 17th Iowa, Maj. Jabez Banbury; 10th Mo., Col. Samuel A. Holmes, Maj. Leonidas Horney; E, 24th Mo., Capt. Lafayette M. Rice; 80th Ohio, Maj. Richard Lanning (k), Capt. David Skeels; 6th Wis. Battery, Capt. Henry Dillon; 12th Wis. Battery, Lieut. Lorenzo D. Immell. Brigade loss: k, 34; w, 227; mi, 15 = 276. cavalry division, Col. John K. Mizner. (Division organized into two brigades, Col. Edward Hatch commanding the First and Col. Albert L. Lee the Second.) 7th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Edward Prince; 11th Ill., Col. Robert (G. Ingersoll; 2d Iowa, Maj. Datus E. Coon; 7th Kan., Lieut.-Col. T. P. Herrick; 3d Mich., Capt. Lyman G. Willcox; 5th Ohio (4 co's), Capt. Joseph C. Smith. Division loss: k, 5; w, 17; m, 14 = 36. unattached: 64th Ill. (Yates's Sharp-shooters), Capt. John Morrill; 1st U. S. (6 co's--siege artillery), Capt. G. A. Williams. Unattached loss: k, 16; w, 53; m, 15 = 84. Army of West Tennessee. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas A. Davies. First Brigade,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Port Hudson, La.: May 23d-July 8th, 1863. (search)
. Third Brigade, Col. Henry W. Birge: 13th Conn., Capt. Apollos Comstock; 25th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Mason C. Wild; 26th Me., Col. Nathaniel H. Hubbard; 159th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles A. Burt. Brigade loss: k, 34; w, 128; m, 10=172. Artillery, Capt. Henry W. Closson: 2d Mass., Capt. Ormand F. Nims; L, 1st U. S., Capt. Henry W. Closson; C, 2d U. S., Lieut. Theodore Bradley. Artillery loss: w, 5; m, 3 = 8. cavalry, Col. Benjamin H. Grierson. 6th Ill., Col. Reuben Loomis; 7th Ill., Col. Edward Prince, 1st La., Maj. Harai Robinson; 3d Mass., Col. Thomas E. Chickering; 14th N. Y., . Cavalry loss: k, 10; w, 37; n, 47 =94. Corps D'Afrique: 6th Inf.,----; 7th Inf.,----; 8th Inf.,----; 9th Inf.,----; 10th Inf.,----. Corps d'afrique loss: k, 15; w, 12 ; m, 4 = 31. Total Union loss: killed, 708; wounded, 3336; captured or missing, 319 = 4363. General Banks, in his official report, says that on May 27th, when h-e first assaulted the enemy's works, his effective force had been reduc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
chmond. While this raid was in progress Colonel J. T. Wilder with a body of 2600 cavalry was destroying the railroads south of Murfreesboro' and capturing a number of prisoners, and other similar movements were being made by Colonels Louis D. Watkins and A. P. Campbell in the direction of Columbia, Tennessee. At this time, also, another celebrated cavalry raid took place in Mississippi. Colonel B. H. Grierson of the 6th Illinois Cavalry, taking his own regiment, the 7th Illinois, Colonel Edward Prince, and the 2d Iowa, Colonel Edward Hatch, left La Grange, Tennessee, April 17th, and in sixteen days traversed six hundred miles of the enemy's country and reached Baton Rouge, where a Federal force was stationed. [See map, Vol. III., p. 442.] Hatch's regiment destroyed the railroads east of Columbus, Mississippi, and returned to La Grange, while the remainder of Grierson's force destroyed much of the Mobile and Ohio and Vicksburg and Meridian railroads. This bold and successful rai
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
and that of the Confederates was about the same. General Crawford's brigade came out of that terrible fight a mere remnant. Some regiments, like those of the One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania and One Hundred and Second New York lost half of their number, dead or wounded. General Geary, with one Pennsylvania and five Ohio regiments, made one of the most desperate charges during the battle, and was severely wounded, with most of his officers. General Auger was also badly wounded; and General Prince, while passing from one part of his command to another, in the dark, was made prisoner. Lee, in his report (Reports of the Army of Northern Virginia, page 18), says he captured 400 prisoners, including a brigadier-general, 5,800 stand of small arms, one piece of artillery, several caissons, and three colors. Among Lee's officers who were slain was General C. S. Winder. At dusk, Ricketts' division of McDowell's corps arrived on the field, and took position to relieve Banks and check the
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