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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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nk two miles over the rocks into the woods, leaving a picket to watch for the rebels. He had not been hid more than an hour before the rebel column came along and followed the road toward Chattanooga, without discovering him. As soon as they had passed he struck across the mountains without guides or a road, but luckily came out on the Tracy City road at the point aimed at, and came down the mountain on an old road to Pelham, in the night, rocky enough to have been the Caucasus to which Prometheus was chained. The troops slept a few ours at the foot of the mountain, their horses revelling in a wheat-field, and started early enough to just escape from Forrest, who, with ten regiments of cavalry, was waiting to intercept the force. Wilder got back to Manchester at one o'clock P. M., and reported to General Rosecrans, who was just betting two thousand dollars with General Stanley that they would get back, which they did, without the loss of a single man; having marched one hundred
was used to express in Greek the very idea that we undertake, in using it, to express in English. Homer, in the Iliad, uses only the aorist eskedasa or skedasa. Thus in Iliad 19: 171, we have skedason laon, for scattering, dispersing. In Prometheus, Aeschylus thus uses it (skeda) in making the sun disperse the hoar frost of the morn. And again Prometheus uses this word in predicting woes upon Jupiter, when he says that a flame more potent than the lightning shall be invented, which shPrometheus uses this word in predicting woes upon Jupiter, when he says that a flame more potent than the lightning shall be invented, which shall (skeda) shiver the ocean-trident, the spear of Neptune. In the Odyssey, we find Homer using skedasis in describing the scattering of the suitors of Penelope when Ulysses should come, and in the twentieth book of the Odyssey we have the same word used for the dispersing of the suitors to their houses, as the result of the return of Ulysses. In Thucydides, book IV., 56, we have an account of a garrison at Cotyria and Aphrodisia, which terrified by an attack a (eskedasmenon) scattered cro
lamented that nothing has come down to us from their Fulgural books. The epochs of the appearance of great comets, of the fall of meteoric stones, and of showers of falling stars, would no doubt have been found recorded in them, as in the more ancient Chinese annals, of which Edouard Biot has made use. Creuser has attempted to show that the natural features of Etruria may have influenced the peculiar turn of mind of its inhabitants. A calling forth of the lightning, which is ascribed to Prometheus, reminds us of the pretended drawing down of lightning by the Fulguratores. This operation consisted in a mere conjuration, and may have been of no more efficacy than the skinned ass's head, which, in the Etruscan rites, was considered a preservative from danger in thunder-storms. In the very complicated Etruscan augural theory, a distinction was made between the soft reminding lightnings sent by Jupiter from his own perfect power, and the violent electrical explosions or chastening t
in obscurity. The same, except as to period, may be said of the Latin word Africa. Its derivation was a mystery 2,300 years ago. For my part I cannot conceive why three names, and women's names especially, should ever have been given to a tract which is in reality one, .... nor can I even say who gave the three tracts their names, or whence they took the epithets. According to the Greeks in general, Libya was so called after a certain Libya, a native woman, and Asia after the wife of Prometheus. The Lydians, however, put in a claim to the latter name, as being from Asius, the son of Cotys. . . As for Europa, no one can say whether it is surrounded by the sea or not, neither is it known whence the name of Europa is derived, nor who gave it name, unless we say that Europa was so called after the Tyrian Europa, and before her time was nameless. .. However let us quit these matters. We shall ourselves continue to use the names which custom sanctions. — Herod., IV. 45. In former
four wagons and eight oxen he gave unto the sons of Merari. — Numbers VII. 3, 7. Camels are not shown in the Egyptian paintings, and could not have been in come on use in that country in Pharaonic times. Their use had long been known in Persia, and some were probably introduced by the immigrating Israelites. Cambyses failed to reach the oasis and temple of Ammon, probably from want of camels. Herodotus refers to the carts and wagons of the Scythians (see cart). Aeschylus, in his Prometheus bound, speaks of the Wandering Scyths who dwell In latticed huts high poised on easy wheels. One of their wagons, measured by Rubruquis, had a distance of 20 feet between the wheels: the axle was like the mast of a sloop, and it was hauled by 22 oxen, 11 abreast (Fig. 7002). Marco Polo, who traveled through this country 1275-1295, states that their houses are circular, and are made of wands covered with felts. These are carried along with them whithersoever they go. They also h
rupt slope, impassable cliffs, inequalities of the surface, a line of earthworks, a cannon, or a fort, but let any one see a battle as it rages, and see it in oil, and I care not what the genius of the artist, he will say, it lacks the cheers and shouts of the combatants. The action is the life and soul of a battle, the noise, the terrible clamor, the roar, the confusion, are all arts of a drama that loses its interest if it fails in one particular. Parrhasius wanted for his picture of Prometheus but a dying groan, and without this he felt that he had failed. Walker, the famous army artist, whose pencil, like a magician's wand, reproduces on canvas scenes around which cluster and cling memories that will be historic, and float down to posterity, to be treasured and revered hundreds of years hence, can put on canvas every other detail of a battle; but without the ringing cheer, the exultant shout, the actual flutter of the flag, the swaying, surging line of battle; in a word, the a
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
n conformity with the Constitution; and even make amendments in this instrument, rendered proper by change of opinion or character, following always the manner therein prescribed. Nor can we dishonor the memories of the revered authors of the Constitution, by supposing that they set their hands to it, believing that slavery was to be perpetual—that the republic, which, reared by them to its giant stature, had snatched from Heaven the sacred fire of freedom, was to be bound, like another Prometheus, in the adamantine chains of fate, while slavery, like another vulture, preyed upon its vitals. Let Franklin speak for them. He was President of the earliest Abolition Society in the United States, and in 1790, only two years after the adoption of the Constitution, addressed a petition to Congress, calling upon them to step to the very verge of the power vested in them for discouraging every species of traffic in our fellow-men. Let Jefferson speak for them. His desire for the abolitio
n conformity with the Constitution; and even make amendments in this instrument, rendered proper by change of opinion or character, following always the manner therein prescribed. Nor can we dishonor the memories of the revered authors of the Constitution, by supposing that they set their hands to it, believing that slavery was to be perpetual—that the republic, which, reared by them to its giant stature, had snatched from Heaven the sacred fire of freedom, was to be bound, like another Prometheus, in the adamantine chains of fate, while slavery, like another vulture, preyed upon its vitals. Let Franklin speak for them. He was President of the earliest Abolition Society in the United States, and in 1790, only two years after the adoption of the Constitution, addressed a petition to Congress, calling upon them to step to the very verge of the power vested in them for discouraging every species of traffic in our fellow-men. Let Jefferson speak for them. His desire for the abolitio
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
Newburyport, Mass., Oct. 17, 1891. Percival, James Gates Born in Berlin, Conn., Sept. 15, 1795. He graduated from Yale in 1815 and studied medicine and botany. Later he was appointed assistant surgeon in the army. He contributed articles to the U. S. Literary magazine; studied geology and was appointed to assist in making a survey of the mineralogy and geology of Connecticut, the results of which are given in his Report of the geology of the state of Connecticut (1842). His poems Prometheus and Clio were published in 1822. He edited Vicesimus Knox's Elegant extracts (1826) ; translated with notes Malte Brun's Geography (3 vols., 1834); assisted Noah Webster in the preparation of his Dictionary of the English language, and wrote several tragedies collected in his Poetical works (1859). Died at Hazel Green, Wis., May 2, 1856. Poe, Edgar Allan Born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 19, 1809. He was partly educated in England and studied at the University of Virginia, and worked for
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
, disregardful of the past, and careless of reflection, but it has inspired us with a faith in our power to rebuild and move on. The evils which beset us do not daunt us, and the virtues we possess we would fain impose upon others. We believe in propaganda, we are uneasy without some cause to further, some improvement to promote. If we ever determine what the American idea is, we shall evangelize the world. It was perhaps this spirit of reform which Lowell had sought to express in his Prometheus and which he had in mind when in another letter to Briggs he declares I am the first who has endeavoured to express the American Idea, and I shall be popular by and by. Ibid. Popularity came first, however, when fervour was linked with wit and humour in The Biglow papers with their racy Yankee dialect and their burning zeal against the aggressiveness of the slave-holding South. The art of these verses has no resemblance to the art of Keats, and their gospel of reform is not a glorious
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