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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 12: Halleck and Pope in Federal command. (search)
General Pope. On the 15th I was ordered to Gordonsville by the Central Railroad with ten brigades. Two others under Hood at Hanover Junction were ordered to join me. Before despatching my corps, General Lee expressed his thought to advance the right column and cavalry by the lower fords of the Rapidan, the left by the fords above the railroad bridge, but left the question open, with orders to me to work on it. The brigades that moved with me were D. R. Jones's, Kemper's, Pickett's, Pryor's, Jenkins's, Featherston's, Wilcox's, Toombs's, Evans's, and Drayton's. Hood's and Whiting's joined us near Gordonsville, Hood commanding the demi-division,--his own and Whiting's brigades. It may be well to write just here that experience during the seven days about Richmond established between General Lee and his first lieutenant relations of confidence and esteem, official and personal, which ripened into stronger ties as the mutations of war bore heavier upon us. He always invited t
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 14: Second battle of Manassas (Bull Run). (search)
the column of direction, to push for the plateau at the Henry House, in order to cut off retreat at the crossings by Young's Branch. Wilcox was called to support and cover Hood's left, but he lost sight of two of his brigades,--Featherston's and Pryor's, --and only gave the aid of his single brigade. Kemper and Jones were pushed on with Hood's right, Evans in Hood's direct support. The batteries were advanced as rapidly as fields were opened to them, Stribling's, J. B. Richardson's, Eshleman's regulars in his front, which could have given us safe sweep to the plateau, an hour before sundown, and in sight of great possibilities. By morning of the 31st everything off the turnpike was nasty and soggy. Stuart's cavalry, followed by Pryor's brigade, were ordered across the Run at Stone Bridge as a diversion, while we were trying another move to reach the enemy's rear. The Confederates had worked all of the winter before, fortifying this new position, just taken by Pope at Centrev
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
he enemy's batteries, and marched on up the left bank as far as the Point of Rocks, where he crossed and rested on the 11th. On the 12th he marched to and bivouacked at Hillsboroa; on the 13th, to the foot of the Blue Ridge and occupied Loudoun Heights by a detachment under Colonel Cooke. Not satisfied with the organization of McLaws's column, I asked and obtained permission on the 10th to strengthen it by three other brigades,--Wilcox's, under Colonel Alfred Cumming; Featherston's, and Pryor's, which were attached to R. H. Anderson's division. The different columns from Frederick marched as ordered, except in the change authorized for Anderson's division. It was a rollicking march, the Confederates playing and singing, as they marched through the streets of Frederick, The girl I left behind me. Jackson recrossed the Potomac on the 11th, at Light's Ford, ordered A. P. Hill's division by the turnpike to Martinsburg, his own and Ewell's northwest to North Mountain Depot to
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 18: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam. (search)
ter part of G. B. Anderson's and Rodes's brigades in the sunken road. Some of Ripley's men came together near Miller's guns at the Hagerstown pike. General R. H. Anderson and his next in rank, General Wright, were wounded. The next officer, General Pryor, not advised of his new authority, the brigades assembled at points most suited to their convenience, in rear of D. H. Hill's brigades. But time was up. Confederate affairs were not encouraging. Our men were all leg-weary and heavy to haof the Fifth and Tenth Infantry under Lieutenant Poland. General Hill seized a musket and by example speedily collected a number of men, who joined him in reinforcing the line threatened by this heavy display. The parts of brigades under General Pryor, Colonels Cummings, Posey, and G. T. Anderson afterwards got up to help the brigade of Evans already there. By these, with the batteries of Squires, Gardner, and Richardson, this threatening demonstration was checked. Then it was reinforced
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Featherston, Col. Carnot Posey; 12th Miss., 16th Miss., Capt. A. M. Feltus; 19th Miss., 2d Miss. Battn. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, Col. J. G. Hodges; 9th, 14th, 38th, 53d, and 57th Va. Pryor's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor; 14th Ala., 2d and 8th Fla., 3d Va. Right's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 44th Ala., 3d, 22d, and 48th Ga. Artillery, Maj. John S. Saunders; Donaldsonville (La.) Art. (Maurin's battery), Huger's (Va.) battBrig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor; 14th Ala., 2d and 8th Fla., 3d Va. Right's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 44th Ala., 3d, 22d, and 48th Ga. Artillery, Maj. John S. Saunders; Donaldsonville (La.) Art. (Maurin's battery), Huger's (Va.) battery, Moormal's (Va.) battery, Thompson's (Grimes's) (Va.) battery. Jones's Division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones:--Toombs's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs, Col. Henry L. Benning; 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes and Major Skidmore Harris; 15th Ga., Col. W. T. Millican; 17th Ga., Capt. J. A. McGregor; 20th Ga., Col. J. B. Cumming. Drayton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton ; 50th Ga., Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; 51st Ga., 15th S. C., Col. W. D. De Saussure. Pickett's Brigade, Col. Eppa
December 22. General Pryor, with a detachment of rebel troops, attacked a body of New York Mounted Rifles, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel B. F. Onderdonk, who were stationed at Isle of Wight Court-House, Va., to protect the election of representatives to Congress, under a late order of General Dix. The Nationals were compelled to retreat after a short skirmish, in which the rebels lost two cavalrymen and a number of guns.--Baltimore American. Governor Shorter, of Alabama, issued an appeal to the people of that State, calling upon the men and youths exempt from the service of the rebel States by reason of their age or other cause, who were capable of bearing arms, to organize themselves into companies, to constitute a reserved force, subject to service in the State upon the call of the Governor.--(Doc. 84.) After reading the Commanding-General's report of the battle of Fredericksburgh, the President issued a proclamation tendering to the officers and soldiers
proceeded to Dyersburg, where they broke up a camp of rebel guerrillas, under the leadership of Captain Dawson. Thirty-four of Dawson's men were killed or captured, but he himself escaped. Yesterday one hundred conscript rebel soldiers went into Murfreesboro, Tenn., and voluntarily surrendered themselves, declaring their attachment to the Union, requesting the privilege of taking the oath of allegiance, and to-day two hundred more followed their example. The schooner Hanover of Provincetown, Massachusetts, was captured off the south side of San Domingo by the rebel schooner Retribution.--Boston Traveller. A fight took place at a point nine miles from Suffolk, Va., known as the Deserted House, between a force of Union troops under General Corcoran, and a body of rebels under the command of General Roger A. Pryor, resulting, after a desperate struggle of three hours duration, in the retreat of the rebels. The loss in this affair was about equal on both sides.--(Doc. 115.)
August 21. Roger A. Pryor, a brigadier-general in the rebel army, resigned his commission.--Lawrence, Kansas, was invaded and pillaged by a band of rebel guerrillas, under the command of the chief Quantrell.--(Doc. 119.) General Gillmore, having rendered Fort Sumter untenable as a fortification, demanded its surrender, together with the rebel forts on Morris Island, threatening to shell Charleston, should his demand not be complied with.--(See Supplement.) The United States ship Bainbridge foundered in a storm off Cape Hatteras, and seventy-nine of the crew were lost. Chattanooga was shelled by the National forces under Colonel Wilder. The cannonade commenced at ten o'clock in the morning, and continued at intervals until five o'clock in the afternoon. Every piece from which the rebels opened was eventually silenced, although they fired with not less than nineteen guns. The only casualty on the Union side was the wounding of one man, Corporal Abram McCook, belo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. Norbourne Berkeley; 18th Va., Lieut.-Col. Henry A. Carrington; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. Robert C. Allen; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k, 26; w, 138; m, 26 == 190. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 9th Ala., Col. Samuel Henry; 10th Ala., Col. John J. Woodward; 19th Miss., Col. Christopher H. Mott (k), Lieut.-Col. L. Q. C. Lamar. Brigade loss: k and w, 231. Fifth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor: 8th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Thomas E. Irby (k); 14th Ala., Maj. 0. K. McLemore; 14th La., Col. R. W. Jones; 32d Va. (detachment); Richmond (Va.) Fayette Artillery, Lieut. W. I. Clopton. Brigade loss: k, w, and m, 214. Colston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Colston: 13th N. C., Col. Alfred M. Scales; 14th N. C., Col. P. W. Roberts; 3d Va., Col. Joseph Mayo. Brigade loss not separately reported. Donaldsonville (La.) Battery (3 guns), Lieut. Lestang Fortier. Fourth division, Major-Gen.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
: 9th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Stephen F. Hale; 10th Ala., Maj. J. J. Woodward; 11th Ala., Col. Sydenham Moore (m w); 19th Miss., Maj. John Mullins. Brigade loss: k and w, 110. Colston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Colston: 13th N. C.; 14th N. C.; 3d Va. Pryor's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor: 8th Ala.; 14th Ala.; 14th La. Hill's division, Maj.-Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Garland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Garland, Jr.: 2d Fla., Col. E. A. Perry; 2d Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. John G. Taylor; 5thBrig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor: 8th Ala.; 14th Ala.; 14th La. Hill's division, Maj.-Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Garland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Garland, Jr.: 2d Fla., Col. E. A. Perry; 2d Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. John G. Taylor; 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae, Maj. P. J. Sinclair; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie, Lieut.-Col. R. D. Johnston (w); 24th Va., Maj. Richard L. Maury (w); 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds; Ala. Battery, Capt. J. W. Bondurant. Brigade loss: k, 98; w, 600; in, 42 = 740. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes (w), Col. John B. Gordon: 5th Ala., Col. C. C. Pegues; 6th Ala., Col. John B. Gordon ; 12th Ala., Col. R. T. Jones (k), Lieut.-Col. B. B. Gayle; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor; 4th Va. Battalion, C
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