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A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Additional delegates to the Provisional Congress, upon its assembling in Richmond, Virginia, in July, 1861. (search)
federate Congress. Hon. James H. ThomasTennessee  Hon. Thomas S. BocockVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress and speaker of the house. Hon. J. W. BrockenboroughVirginia Hon. R. M. T. HunterVirginiaAfterwards Confederate Senator from Virginia; Secretary of State, &c. Hon. Robert JohnsonVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress. Hon. Wm. H. McFarlandVirginia  Hon. James M. MasonVirginiaAfterwards commissioner to Europe. Hon. Walter PrestonVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress. Hon. Wm. Ballard PrestonVirginiaAfterwards Confederate Senator from Virginia. Hon. Roger A. PryorVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress; Brigadier-General in the Confederate army, &c. Hon. William C. RivesVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress. Hon. Charles W. RussellVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress. Hon. Robert E. ScottVirginia  Hon. James A. SeddonVirginiaAfterwards Secretary of War. Hon. Waller R. StaplesVirginiaAfterwards member of Congress. Hon. John TylerVirginiaAfterwards member of Congres
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Members of the First and Second Congresses of the Confederate States. (search)
st Congress; afterwards special agent to Canada. Hon.F. W. M. HollidayVirginiaMember of Second Congress. Hon.Albert G. JenkinsVirginiaMember of First Congress; afterwards Brigadier-General in Confederate service. Hon.Robert JohnsonVirginiaMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.Fayette McMullenVirginiaMember of Second Congress. Hon.Samuel A. Miller Member of Second Congress. Hon.Robert L. Montague Member of Second Congress. Hon.Walter PrestonVirginiaMember of First Congress. Hon.Roger A. PryorVirginiaMember of First Congress; afterwards Brigadier-General in Confederate service. Hon.William C. RivesVirginiaMember of Second Congress. Hon.Charles W. RussellVirginiaMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.William SmithVirginiaMember of First Congress; afterwards Brigadier-General and Major-General in Confederate service, and Governor of Virginia. Hon.Waller R. StaplesVirginiaMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.John TylerVirginiaMember of First Congress. Hon.Robert H. Wh
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
timately to render slaves valueless to their owners, and thus effect their emancipation. Lib. 28.1. The Legislature unanimously responded by asking him to call a State Lib. 28.15. Convention if Congress refused to admit Kansas under the Lecompton Constitution. At the so-called Southern Commercial Convention held at Montgomery, Ala., on Lib. 28.87; Hodgson's Cradle of the Confederacy, p. 371. May 10, 1858, to discuss the African slave-trade and the relations of the South to the Union, Roger A. Pryor of Virginia could pledge his State to disunion in case a Ibid., p. 382. Black Republican President were installed at Washington with a majority in Congress. Henry W. Hilliard of Alabama agreed that the election of such a President Ibid., p. 385. would result in the subversion of the Government, and that the South would neither wait to see him installed, nor delay for some overt act. William L. Yancey of Alabama, though denying that Republican success at Ibid., p. 391. the next electi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
he had hoped that we might be spared any such day of humiliation. I await the corrected edition of your sermon, On Mr. Webster. which has produced everywhere a profound impression. The writers for the Washington Union have all read it; and Pryor, Roger A. Pryor. the young Virginian who has been placed in the establishment as the representative of Mason, Hunter, and Meade, read it through twice and then announced to his friends that there was but one course for them,—namely, to maintaiRoger A. Pryor. the young Virginian who has been placed in the establishment as the representative of Mason, Hunter, and Meade, read it through twice and then announced to his friends that there was but one course for them,—namely, to maintain that slavery is an unmixed good. To Mrs. Horatio Greenough, December 21:— Sincerely and deeply I mourn with you. The death of Horatio Greenough He died. Dec. 18, 1852. at the age of forty-seven. Mrs. Greenough died in 1892. is a loss not only to wife and children, but to friends and the world, to art and literature. With sorrow unspeakable I learned the first blow of his fatal illness; now I am pained again by the tidings of to-day. Only a few days before I left home he read to <
L. Brockett, major; the Twenty-sixth, R. E. Colston, colonel, H. T. Parish, lieutenant-colonel, and John C. Page, major; the Forty-first, John R. Chambliss, Jr., colonel, George Blow, Jr., lieutenantcol-onel, and Fred W. Smith, major. The Forty-first had but seven companies. There was a cavalry regiment of eight companies, without field officers, and a battalion of field artillery of five companies, without field officers. Of the officers named, Mahone afterward became major-general, and Pryor, Weisiger, Colston and Chambliss, brigadier-generals. Col. Robert Johnston, commanding the cavalry at Cockletown, reported that a volunteer scout of four had returned to camp that morning, bringing in Captain Jenkins and Lieutenant Shurtleff of the United States naval brigade. This scout met a party of six, near New Market bridge, killed Major Rawlings, wounded the two officers brought in, and put the rest to flight. Soon afterward Colonel Johnston reported that he would occupy Bethel,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
and decide the day. Hood moved to the final assault with Hampton's legion on his left. On the left of the legion was Law's splendid brigade. Immediately on Hood's right was Pickett's brigade, and in support of Pickett the brigades of Wilcox, Pryor and Featherston. Thus, in the decisive charge, ordered by General Lee all along the battle line, they were hurled against and around the wooded bluff on the Federal left. In this grand assault, R. H. Anderson's brigade was divided, part of it sns. Longstreet specially mentions Anderson, Jenkins and Captain Kilpatrick of the Palmetto sharpshooters in his report, for distinguished conduct. A. P. Hill reports that Gregg was sent by General Longstreet's request to support the brigades of Pryor and Featherston, and pushed their battle forward. Featherston being wounded and for a time in the enemy's hands, his brigade was driven back and scattered, when, says Hill, Colonel McGowan, with the Fourteenth South Carolina, retrieved our groun
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
the garrison at Pensacola under General Bragg; at the end of one year's service re-enlisted as private in a Florida regiment, and went to Virginia in time to participate in the second battle of Manassas, as color-bearer of his regiment, in Gen. Roger A. Pryor's brigade. For gallantry on this field he was promoted to the staff of General Pryor, as brigade adjutant-general. He was subsequently transferred to the staff of Gen. Micah Jenkins, with whom he served in Longstreet's corps through the General Pryor, as brigade adjutant-general. He was subsequently transferred to the staff of Gen. Micah Jenkins, with whom he served in Longstreet's corps through the campaigns of North Georgia and East Tennessee, and in Virginia until the death of General Jenkins at the battle of the Wilderness, where he himself was wounded. After a short time on the staff of Gen. John Bratton, he was transferred to the staff of Gen. Bushrod Johnson, with whom he continued until the surrender at Appomattox. On the staffs of Generals Jenkins, Bratton and Johnson, his office was inspector-general, with the rank of captain. He practiced his profession in Florida until his d
f battle of Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862. (588,589) Roger A. Pryor's report of battle of Williamsburg, says: The gallant ral Magruder's report. (482) Col. J. A. Winston, commanding Pryor's brigade, 800 strong. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's army on t of the battle of Williamsburg. Vol. XI, Part 2—(486) In Pryor's brigade, Longstreet's division, Magruder's corps, engagemhts before Richmond, June 26 to July 1, 1862. (781) Gen. Roger A. Pryor, writing of his brigade at Frayser's Farm: The Fourtarmy in the peninsula, about April 30, 1862. (532, 649) In Pryor's brigade, Longstreet's division, Johnston's army near Richmond, May 21 to July 23, 1862. Vol. XII, Part 2—(547) Pryor's brigade, Wilcox's division, army of Northern Virginia, durinat Manassas Plains, August 30th. (600) Mentioned in Gen. Roger A. Pryor's report of same battle. Vol. XIX, Part 1—(804, 812) In Pryor's brigade, Anderson's division, Maryland campaign. Losses, 2 killed and 43 wounded. Vol. XIX, P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
Guard Artillery); Dement's (First Maryland Artillery); Brown's (Second Maryland Artillery); Balthis's (Staunton Artillery); Pleasants's (Manchester Artillery)—(7). On Longstreet's wing. Attached to Hood's Division, (Major B. W. Frobel, Chief of Artillery).—Bachman's South Carolina Battery; Garden's South Carolina Battery; Reilly's North Carolina Battery—(3). Attached to Wilcox's Division.—Anderson's (Thomas Artillery), with Wilcox's Brigade; Maurin's (Donaldsonville Artillery), with Pryor's Brigade; Chapman's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's Division). Brown's (Wise Artillery)—(1). Attached to Evans's Brigade.—Boyce's South Carolina Battery (Macbeth Artillery)—(1). Attached to Anderson's Division, (Major Saunders, Chief of Artillery).—Huger's Battery; Moorman's; Grimes's—(3). There were also present, not assigned to special infantry commands: Washington Artille
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who fired the first gun at Sumter? (search)
epeated to General Beauregard, who informed President Davis. The result was, a second message was sent to Major Anderson by the same officers, accompanied by Roger A. Pryor, of Virginia, and Colonel Chisholm, of South Carolina. The messengers arrived at Sumter at 12:25 A. M. April 12th. Major Anderson was informed that if he woue first gun was fired at Fort Sumter, and at 4:40 the second gun was fired from the same battery. Captain James offered the honor of firing the first shot to Roger A. Pryor, of Virginia. He declined; saying he could not fire the first gun. Another officer then offered to take Pryor's place. James replied: No! I will fire it myPryor's place. James replied: No! I will fire it myself. And he did fire it. At 4:45 A. M., nearly all the batteries in harbor were firing on Sumter. Mr. Edmund Ruffin (who was much beloved and respected) was at the iron battery on Morris Island. I always understood he fired the first gun from the iron battery, but one thing is certain-he never fired the first gun against Fort S
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