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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
never meet in this world again, God grant that we may meet in the next. The boat containing the two aides and also Roger A. Pryor, of Virginia, and A. R. Chisolm, of South Carolina, who were also Confederate mortar-battery on Morris Island, commen 4 A. M. Captain James at once aroused his command, and arranged to carry out the order. He was a great admirer of Roger A. Pryor, and said to him, You are the only man to whom I would give up the honor of firing the first gun of the war ; and he offered to allow him to fire it. Pryor, on receiving the offer, was very much agitated. With a husky voice he said, I could not fire the first gun of the war. His manner was almost similar to that of Major Anderson as we left him a few moments befon as General Beauregard heard that the flag was no longer flying, he sent three of his aides, William Porcher Miles, Roger A. Pryor, and myself, to offer, and also to see if Major Anderson would receive or needed, assistance, in subduing the flames
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes on the surrender of Fort Sumter. (search)
d so again he would open his fire on our batteries. Under our instructions this reply admitted of no other answer than the one dated April 12th, 1861, 3:20 A. M. [see page 76], which was dictated by Chesnut, written by Lee, and copied by me. Roger A. Pryor was with us on the second visit, but did not enter the fort, giving me as a reason that his State, Virginia, had not yet seceded. For the same reason he declined to fire the signal shot. Moreover, I believe he was then a member of Congress,re, and, assuming authority from General Beauregard, called upon Major Anderson to surrender. Major Anderson did not realize the unauthorized nature of Wigfall's mission until the arrival of Captain Stephen D. Lee, William Porcher Miles, and Roger A. Pryor with an offer direct from General Beauregard, similar to the one General Simons was authorized to make. Major Anderson was about to renew the action, when Major David R. Jones arrived with the offer of terms for the surrender of the fort, wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
t and revised from the North American review for January and February, 1886.-editors. G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. On the 22d of January, 1862, Colonel Roger A. Pryor, a member of the Military Committee of the lower branch of the Confederate Congress, visited my headquarters at Centreville, Virginia, and in his own nameand men of all arms, which, though widely scattered, might, by virtue of the possession of the interior lines, be concentrated and operated offensively, I gave Colonel Pryor authority to inform Mr. Davis of my readiness to be thus transferred. Upon the return of Colonel Pryor to Richmond, I was, on the 26th of January, ordered to Colonel Pryor to Richmond, I was, on the 26th of January, ordered to proceed at once to report to General A. S. Johnston at Bowling Green, Kentucky, and thence as promptly as possible to assume my new command at Columbus, which, said my orders, is threatened by a powerful force, and the defense of which is of vital importance. Dispatching Colonel Thomas Jordan, my chief of staff, to Richmond, wi