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the street. Young, Kennedy and Drury were discharged by Justice Hiss and the others released on security, Harrison for a hearing this morning. Caleb Sawyer was arrested and fined five dollars for discharging a pistol at John Isaacs. This affair occurred on Calvert street, Sawyer being pointed out as a rebel while passing near the corner of Baltimore street, and on his running away was pursued by an excited crowd, at the foremost of which he discharged several barrels of his revolver. Sergeant Pryor ran to and succeeded in protecting him from the crowd, none of whom received any injury from the discharge of the revolver. Major-General Dix sent for Marshal Van Nostrand and asked if his force was sufficient to preserve the peace of the city, and received an answer in the affirmative. He assured the Marshal that such proceedings should not be tolerated in his Department, and that if necessary he would call out the military. --Baltimore American, May 26. Doc. 117.-General McCle
ng disorderly or fighting in the street. Young, Kennedy and Drury were discharged by Justice Hiss and the others released on security, Harrison for a hearing this morning. Caleb Sawyer was arrested and fined five dollars for discharging a pistol at John Isaacs. This affair occurred on Calvert street, Sawyer being pointed out as a rebel while passing near the corner of Baltimore street, and on his running away was pursued by an excited crowd, at the foremost of which he discharged several barrels of his revolver. Sergeant Pryor ran to and succeeded in protecting him from the crowd, none of whom received any injury from the discharge of the revolver. Major-General Dix sent for Marshal Van Nostrand and asked if his force was sufficient to preserve the peace of the city, and received an answer in the affirmative. He assured the Marshal that such proceedings should not be tolerated in his Department, and that if necessary he would call out the military. --Baltimore American, May 26.
wing particulars this morning: It seems that Gen. Pryor pushed his way across the Blackwater last Sun driven two miles from the deserted house. Pryor had the advantage of position, and the directigreat many rumors of an engagement between General Pryor and the enemy, which it was alleged occurrven them. Saturday afternoon a courier from Gen. Pryor arrived in the city, bringing a despatch forto copy. It will be seen that so far from General Pryor's command meeting with any thing like a re in our favor. The following is a copy of General Pryor's official despatch: Carrsville, Islheavy loss on the enemy. Respectfully, Roger A. Pryor, Brigadier-General Commanding. From ashowing no disposition to renew the fight, General Pryor retired to Carrsville, eight miles from thnemy, let him come in any force he may. General Pryor's address. headquarters forces on Blackwaourage and good conduct. By order of Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor. W. A. Whitner, A. A. General. [1 more...]
hich forty or fifty shots were fired on each side. One Yankee was seen to fall from the saddle. No one was struck on our side. Major Wrenn, finding the enemy's force superior to his own, fell back slowly toward Richmond. During the night, General Pryor rode out from the city alone, and joined Major Wrenn. The men remained in the saddle all night, falling back slowly, and watching the enemy. At five o'clock this morning the retreating party came in sight of the Brooke bridge, on the Brookeof the enemy. Without loss of time he bore still further east, and by dint of urging his jaded horses to their utmost, was enabled to reach and cross in safety the Mechanicsville bridge, from which point access to the city was unobstructed. General Pryor and Major Wrenn at once repaired to the camp of the battalion at the old fair grounds, and set about collecting fresh horses with which to resume the field. Between one and two o'clook P. M., John L. Phillips and James Crone, the telegraph
How Roger A. Pryor was captured and escaped.--A letter to the Charleston Courier, written from the field in Virginia, after the battles with Pope's army, near Manassas, (August, 1862,) says: Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor, during the day, had the misfortune to be taken a prisoner, but the corresponding good fortune to escapem keenly, asked him to what regiment, brigade and division he belonged, and, as Pryor hesitated and stammered out his reply, the Yankee sprang to his feet and exclaier now jumped to his feet, apparently as if to escape but he also received from Pryor a lunge that left him helpless on the field. Throwing down the musket, the Gen aid returned with the information that he had found one so injured. Whereupon Pryor mounted his horse and went in person to see him. The man was asleep when he entsurprised when he learned that the author of his misery was the redoubtable Roger A. Pryor. July 9.--At a meeting of the Directors of the American Express Company
cox,Fourth brigade,1321652754119669881,055 R. A. Pryor,Fifth brigade,1515435645 1150810860 W. S. by Colonel Robinson, Fifth Texas, to Brigadier-General Pryor, or some of his staff. The enemy congade were relieved by Generals Featherston and Pryor, and moved to a position near and beyond Mechathe front and to the right of the positions of Pryor and Featherston, and formed in the woods on th the enemy's skirmishers withdrew. A battery (Pryor's) was now brought to the front, and from a cos brigades were brought up near and in rear of Pryor. Pryor's regiment advancing against the skirm front of us, and not far distant, my own, Generals Pryor and Featherston's brigades were ordered tondsomely driven from the skirt of woods by General Pryor's brigade. The three brigades were subjnes's house. These three brigades — Wilcox's, Pryor's, and my own — constituted the extreme right thought the enemy advancing. On reaching General Pryor's brigade, which was then on the extreme l[29 more...]
s full of water about Weverton, I directed General Pryor, if tools could be obtained, to cut the cathey were in full view of where my own and General Pryor's brigades were resting, on high ground, i company, both under the direction of Brigadier-General Pryor, with instructions to approach the pa the enemy's artillery. Before seven A. M., Pryor's brigade was placed in position in line at rie enclosed reports of Generals Featherston and Pryor will bring to your notice such instances of mef Second battle of Manassas. headquarters Pryor's brigade, near Winchester, October 5, 1862. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Roger A. Pryor, Brigadier-General, commanding. Repor was held in reserve, with one regiment of General Pryor's. As soon as our line was formed, an advas charge parts of Wilcox's, Featherston's, and Pryor's brigades participated with mine, and, I am peen ordered to halt there by somebody, not General Pryor. Finding General P. in a few moments, and[16 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
line Kemper's brigade was on the right, then Jenkins, Willcox, and Pryor successively toward the left. His second line was formed with Pick his objective point being Randol's battery. This was Wilcox's and Pryor's two brigades, which had been extending to their left, still expecy advanced in line of battle, Wilcox near the New Market Road, with Pryor on his left. They continued on in this way for some distance, but ugh, and the woods so dense, that their progress was much impeded. Pryor, who seems to have made the best progress, was forced to form his bncing force, and charge up to within fifty yards of the batteries. Pryor's right, which was the first, as well as, from the nature of the gralted and then moved further to its left and joined the remnants of Pryor's and Featherstone's forces, and continued the fight there, the oth guns, and had helped in breaking up and driving them off. This was Pryor's assault in column of regiments. As the last line wavered and bro
166, 196, 258, 303-308, 321, 323, 335, 354; II, 136, 149, 234, 291, 322, 365. Porter, Admiral. II, 234, 241. Porter, Com., I, 67, 73, 301. Porter, Andrew, I, 355. Porter, Fitz-John, I, 276, 281, 282, 284, 297, 302, 308, 312, 327, 328, 344. Porter, T. H., I, 66, 68, 69. Port Royal, battle of, Nov. 7, 1861, I, 227. Potter, Joseph A., I, 230. Potter, Robert B., II, 346. Powell, Senator, II, 165. Prendergast, Catherine Gordon, I, 7. Prince, Harry, I, 244. Pryor, Roger A., I, 287, 290, 292. Puebla, battle of, 1847, I, 196. Puleston, Col., II, 149. Pyne, Rev. Dr., II, 235. Q Quitman, John A., I, 166, 170, 172, 174. R Ramsay, Geo. D., I, 30, 43, 95, 378. Ramseur, Stephen D., II, 48, 50. Randall, Alexander, I, 21, 35, 286, 290, 292, 293, 295-298. Randolph, Geo. E., II, 66, 67, 79. Raymond, Mr., I, 358, 359. Reconstruction period, 1865, II, 283-296. Reynolds, John F., I, 196, 224, 233, 237, 247, 255, 257, 262, 268, 270,
deputation, consisting of Senator Chesnut, Roger A. Pryor, Capt. Lee, and W. Porcher Miles, came froation consisted of Major Lace, Col. Chism, Roger A. Pryor, Senator Chesnut, and others. Major Ander. Porcher Miles, Senator Chesnut, and the Hon. Roger A. Pryor, the staff of Gen. Beauregard, approaother members of his staff, including the Hon. Roger A. Pryor and Gov. Manning, proposing the same a rather amusing incident occurred. The Hon. Roger A. Pryor of Virginia, being very thirsty, and ll. The surgeon, observing it, said to him, Col. Pryor, did you drink any of that? Pryor, looking Pryor, looking very pale answered, Yes, quite an amount; a good deal. The surgeon said it was poison. Pryor turnPryor turned paler yet, and asked what he should do. The surgeon told him to go with him to the hospital. The last that was seen of Pryor by the officers — he was going out leaning upon the surgeon's arm, of ipecac, which produced the desired effect. Pryor did not express himself as having had a peculi
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