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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Putnam or search for Putnam in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

siana, two heavy thirty-two pounders and twenty-eight-inch shell guns; Hetzel, one nine-inch shell gun and one eighty-pounder rifled gun; Commodore Perry, two nine-inch shell guns; Underwriter, one eight-inch gun and one eighty-pounder rifled gun; Valley City, four thirty-two-pounders and one rifled howitzer; Commodore Barney, two nine-inch shell guns; Hunchback, two nine-inch shell guns and one one-hundred-pounder rifled gun; Ceres, one thirty-two-pounder and one thirty-pounder Parrott gun; Putnam, one thirty-pounder rifled gun and one light thirty-two pounder; Morse, two nine-inch shell guns; Lockwood, one eighty-pounder rifled gun and one twenty-four pounder howitzer; J. N. Seymour, two thirty-pounder Parrott guns; sloop Granite, one thirty-two pounder; Brinker, one thirty-pounder rifled gun; Whitehead, one nine-inch shell gun; Shawsheen, two twenty-pounder Parrott guns. The gunboats of the coast division engaged, under the direction of Commander Hazard, U. S.N., are: Picket, fou
ship; Underwriter, Lieut. Corn. W. N. Jeffers; Louisiana, Lieut. Com. Murray; Lockwood, Acting Master Graves; Seymour, Lieut. Corn. Wells; Hetzell, Lieut. Com. Davenport; Shawsheen, Acting Master Woodruff; Valley City, Lieut. Corn. Chaplin; General Putnam, Acting Master Hotchkiss; Commodore Perry, Lieut. Corn. Flusser; Ceres, Acting Master MacDiarmid; Morse, Acting Master Hayes; Whitehead, Acting Master French; Brincker, Acting Master Giddings, making fourteen in all. The distance to Elizawriter took the Forrest in the same style, while the Delaware took the Fanny in fine shape, she having received ten shots from our squadron, which made daylight through her in as many places. The Morse, Shawsheen, Lockwood, Hetzell, Valley City, Putnam, Whitehead, Brincker, and Seymour also covered themselves with glory. Every officer and man in our entire squadron behaved like a hero, one as brave as the other, all through this desperate charge. The terrified rebels, as they forsook their gu
been for the valuable assistance rendered by the gunboats in landing, Gen. Reno would have been delayed many hours longer. He expressed himself as under many obligations to the officers and men of the entire navy fleet at Elizabeth City, many of whom plunged into the water, and worked like heroes until everything was landed, and the force on the march. Among those boats most efficient in this good work were the Perry, Delaware, Lockwood, Picket, South-field, Stars and Stripes, Underwriter, Putnam, Ceres, Shawsheen, and Whitehead. By five o'clock on the morning of the nineteenth, Reno's column was in motion. So quietly had the landing of the troops been effected that no alarm whatever was given by the enemy's pickets, four of whom were found asleep not more than fifty rods from our place of debarkation. It is also evident that the rebel troops at Elizabeth City, three miles from the landing, knew nothing of our approach or operations during the night, for they were in their camp,