hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 22 results in 5 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
luctance, of course. As a matter of experiment, it was agreed that he should waive all right and title to any part of the Liberator for the term of two years—he being paid such remuneration as impartial referees might feel disposed to award. It was further agreed that, during this period, the pecuniary concerns of the paper should be managed by a responsible committee, in whom its friends could feel the utmost confidence; and, consequently, the present committee Messrs. Jackson, Loring, Quincy, Philbrick, and Bassett (Lib. 9: 203). kindly consented to act in this capacity—to the universal gratification of the friends of the Liberator. When the question of remuneration was submitted to the referees, (who were all quite friendly to Mr. Knapp), they summoned a number of practical printers as witnesses to determine the amount that ought to be awarded to Mr. Knapp. On being asked, of what pecuniary value a newspaper could be which sunk one or two thousand dollars per annum over an
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
respondence of this year will enable us to present the story largely in the words of the chief actors. Let us begin with an extract from a letter of Mr. Garrison's to G. W. Benson, dated Boston, January 4, 1840: How sorry I am to say that it will be utterly out of my Ms. power to be with you at Hartford on the 8th inst. But what I cannot do, I cannot. I know how great will be the disappointment of the Connecticut friends—your own—and all the household at Brooklyn. And, what is worse, Quincy tells me Edmund Quincy. that he will not be able to go. He made the attempt before The meeting was originally appointed for Dec. 18, 1839, and actually met on that date, Birney being present. A resolution against Third Party was laid on the table, and the meeting adjourned on account of the weather (Lib. 9.206; 10.2). —got half-way, or part way—was forced to stay in the cars all night, and then return home, in consequence of the storm. The annual meeting of our State Society takes pla
(Mass.) Convention of friends of Christian Union, 2.421, 422, 427, described by Quincy, 426, by Colver, 429. Guerrero, Vincente [d. 1831], A. S. decree of Sept. 16ly A. S. Magazine, edited by E. Wright, 2.63, 178, G. invited to write, 178. Quincy, Edm'd [1604-1637], 2.194. Ancestor of Quincy, Edmund [b. Boston, Feb. 1, 1Quincy, Edmund [b. Boston, Feb. 1, 1808; d. Dedham, Mass., May 17, 1877], stirred by Lovejoy's murder, 2.185, calls public meeting, 187; joins Mass. A. S. S., 194; calls Peace Convention, 223, assignin A. Collins, 2.420, 421, 426, 432.—Portrait in Harper's Monthly, Jan., 1880. Quincy, Josiah [1744-17751, 2.189. Father of Quincy, Josiah [1772-1864], 2.194. FatherQuincy, Josiah [1772-1864], 2.194. Father of Quincy, Josiah [1802-1882], picture of Miss Marshall, 1.78; at Prescott trial, 514; witnesses Boston mob, 2.22. Brother of E. Q. of Dedham. Raleigh (N. C.),Quincy, Josiah [1802-1882], picture of Miss Marshall, 1.78; at Prescott trial, 514; witnesses Boston mob, 2.22. Brother of E. Q. of Dedham. Raleigh (N. C.), Grand Jury indict Garrison and Knapp, 1.240. Rand, George C., apprentice of J. L. Homer, 2.10, 11, 35. Randolph, John [1773-1833], a colonizationist, 1.91; on
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
of promoting the truth, and not of obtaining victory. You will find him an excellent auxiliary in your other business, and his influence out of the meetings will be very beneficial in disarming prejudice and comforting friends. By September 22, Quincy could write to Webb: The Ms. Disunion doctrine obtains almost universally among the old-school abolitionists, Ohio was an exception. The State Anti-Slavery Society deprecated the new policy as narrowing the anti-slavery platform with a new ttalogue, and I hope it may not be necessary. It may be you cannot control it, but I beg that all your influence be given to [that end]. I have urged our noble friend G. to go up [as] soon as possible, Garrison. and I hope he will,—and so has Quincy, Phillips, Mrs. Chapman, and others,—to see all, hear all, and, if it be possible, settle all. We all intend to go up to the convention this month, when I most sincerely trust you will be well, and the Herald difficulty settled. N. P. Rogers
ple,—its community is its security, exclusiveness is its doom. Ergo—not white liberty, but liberty for all races of men; not the white man's God, but the God of humanity; not national patriotism, but My Country is the World, My Countrymen are All Mankind. Ergo—No Union with Slaveholders! Ergo, Kossuth not the guest in Boston Pulszky's White, Red, and Black, 2.171, 172, 174-177. of the Webster Whigs, the apologists of the Fugitive Slave Law, but the companion of Garrison, Phillips, and Quincy. But no, after a lament that he had come to Kossuth in New England, p. 91. America in the midst of a Presidential campaign, Kossuth continued: The second difficulty I have to contend with is rather Ibid., p. 92. curious. Many a man has told me that, if I had only not fallen into the hands of the abolitionists and Free Soilers, he would have supported me; and had I landed somewhere in the South, instead of New York, I would have met quite different things from that quarter; but, bei<