Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for Edmund Quincy or search for Edmund Quincy in all documents.

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cres; to John Bridge, 350 acres; severally about the outside of the bounds between Watertowne, Concord, and Charlestowne. During this period, the General Court passed several orders, affecting the comfort and prosperity of the people dwelling here:— Oct. 28, 1636. The Court agreed to give 400l. towards a school or college, whereof 200l. to be paid the next year, and 200l. when the work is finished, and the next Court to appoint where and what building. Mass. Col. Rec., i. 183. President Quincy (Hist. Harv. Coll., i. 1), states that this foundation of the College was laid Sept. 8, 1636, overlooking the fact that the General Court, which met on that day, adjourned until October, and made this grant on the 28th day of that month. The College was ordered to be established at Newtown, Nov. 15, 1637, and the town granted to the Professor 2 2/3 acres of land, on which Holworthy, Stoughton, and Hollis Halls are supposed to stand. This grant to the Professor, made May 11, 1638, is d
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
ev. Mr. Morton, Mr. Allin, and Mr. Willard laid on hands. The Rev. Mr. Saml. Willard gave the right hand of fellowship. . . . . Deo sit gloria. Amen. The proceedings at this ordination seem to have been misapprehended by some historians. President Quincy says that Brattle gave immediate evidence of his disposition to set himself free from some customs of the established Congregational Church. He preached at his own ordination, and forbade an elder, because he was a layman, to lay his hand uwas sold to the College. For the space of forty years, up to 1873, the annual Commencements of Harvard College were celebrated in this new house, which is still standing; and it is perhaps not extravagant to apply to it the language used by President Quincy concerning the former house; namely, that no existing building in Massachusetts can compare with it in the number of distinguished men who at different times have been assembled within its walls. After the resignation of Dr. Newell, the chu
H. C. 1685, and res. in Windsor, Conn. John the f. d. 11 Oct. 1668; his widow Elizabeth m. Col. Edmund Quincy 8 Dec. 1680. Mr. Eliot was a person of notable accomplishments, and a lively, zealous, acueth, b. at Rox. 14 Mar. 1644-5, m. Rev. John Eliot, Jr., 23 May 1666; he d. 1668, and she m. Edmund Quincy of Braintree 1680, and d. there 30 Nov. 1700; she was mother of Edmund Quincy, Esq., who d. Edmund Quincy, Esq., who d. in London 1738, and the ancestor of many distinguished persons of that name; Hannah, bap. at Rox. 9 May 1647, d. there and was buried 2 Aug. 1647; and in Camb., Daniel, b. 8 Ap. 1649, d. 3 Sept. 1649eful life 19 Mar. 1686-7, a. 75 years. 2. Daniel, s. of Daniel (1), m. Elizabeth, dau. of Edmund Quincy of Braintree, in 1681; she d. 2 Jan. 1690-91, and he m. Bethia Collicutt 21 July 1692. His D. 1786. He resigned his Professorship in 1791, being disabled by paralysis, which office, President Quincy says, he sustained for twenty-six years, with an equal reputation for learning, fidelity, a
dge Village (now Newton), m. Sarah, dau. of Thomas Willett of Swansea (first English mayor of New York); she d. 13 June 1664 (or 1665, as Jackson says), and he m. Elizabeth, dau. of Gen. Daniel Gookin, 23 May 1666. By his first wife he had Sarah, bap. 21 Sept. 1662, m. John Bowles of Roxbury 1 Nov. 1681; and by his second wife, John, b. 28 April 1667, who was educated by his grandparents, grad. H. C. 1685, and res. in Windsor, Conn. John the f. d. 11 Oct. 1668; his widow Elizabeth m. Col. Edmund Quincy 8 Dec. 1680. Mr. Eliot was a person of notable accomplishments, and a lively, zealous, acute preacher, not only to the English at New. Cambridge, but also to the Indians thereabout. Mather. 3. Ebenezer, parentage not ascertained, m. Susanna Soden 2 May 1745, and had Susmanna, b. 19 Mar. 1745-6, m. Aaron Swan 19 Sept. 1765; Hannah, b. 18 Jan. 1747-8; Ebenezer, b. 18 Aug. 1749; Lovisa, b. 20 Aug. 1751; Marqaret, b. 30 June 1753; Elizabeth Prentice, b. 27 Sept. 1755; Thomas, b. 3 , Ja
Edmund Batter of Salem 8 June 1670, and was living in 1685; Elizabeth, b. at Rox. 14 Mar. 1644-5, m. Rev. John Eliot, Jr., 23 May 1666; he d. 1668, and she m. Edmund Quincy of Braintree 1680, and d. there 30 Nov. 1700; she was mother of Edmund Quincy, Esq., who d. in London 1738, and the ancestor of many distinguished persons of tEdmund Quincy, Esq., who d. in London 1738, and the ancestor of many distinguished persons of that name; Hannah, bap. at Rox. 9 May 1647, d. there and was buried 2 Aug. 1647; and in Camb., Daniel, b. 8 Ap. 1649, d. 3 Sept. 1649; Daniel, b. 12 July 1650; Samuel, b. 22 Ap. 1652; Solomon, b. 20 June and d. 16 July 1654; Nathaniel, b. 22 Oct. 1656. His w. Mary d. after 4 Oct. 1681, and he m. Hannah, wid. of Habijah Savage of Boar the easterly angle of Bow Street. Here he closed his long and useful life 19 Mar. 1686-7, a. 75 years. 2. Daniel, s. of Daniel (1), m. Elizabeth, dau. of Edmund Quincy of Braintree, in 1681; she d. 2 Jan. 1690-91, and he m. Bethia Collicutt 21 July 1692. His children were Daniel, b. 7 July 1683; Mary, b. 16 Oct. 1685, m. Tho
. of consumption Aug. 1790; Thomas, bap. 1 Aug. 1773, d. June 1775; Thomas, b. in Concord (where the College exercises were pursued during the occupation of Cambridge by the Continental Troops) 2 Nov. 1775, an eminent merchant in Boston, d. 27 Mar. 1855. Edward the f. grad. H. C. 1749, was Tutor 1764, succeeded his father as Hollis Professor of Divinity 1765, Fellow of the College 1779-1792, D. D. 1786. He resigned his Professorship in 1791, being disabled by paralysis, which office, President Quincy says, he sustained for twenty-six years, with an equal reputation for learning, fidelity, and a catholic spirit. He inherited the homestead, and d. 17 June 1794. Wilcox, William (otherwise written Wilcock, Wilcocke, and Wilcocks), m. Mary Powell 22 Jan. 1650, resided on the southerly side of Brattle Street, near Ash Street, and d. 28 Nov. 1653; he probably had no children. In his will, he devised his whole estate to his wife, so long as she remained his widow; upon her death or mar
. Pickering, 321. Pickman, 310. Pigeon, 308. Pittimee, 391. Plympton, 168, 204, 435, 8. Pomeroy, 310. Poole, 8, 32, 116. Porter, 231, 6. 88. Post, 33. Powers, 319. Pratt, 20, 4, 6, 7, 32, 5, 76, 233. Prentice. or Prentiss, 4, 59, 76, 80, 1, 92, 4, 118, 214, 88, 92, 305, 92. 4, 400, 31. Prescott, 185, 288, 423. Price, 2 87. Prince, 33, 247. Prout, 272. Prudden, 49, 50. Pryor, 331. Putnam, 187, 423, 4, 6. Pynchon, 6, 8, 27, 398. Quincy, 42, 275, 82, 304, 65. Randolph, 76, 7, 95, 6, 103– 8. Ravenscroft, 110. Rawson, 99, 350, 1, 89, 98. Ray, 321. Raymond, 342. Read, 201, 31, 92, 324, 40, 427, 8. Reading, 11, 32. Reed, 201, 31, 92, 324, 40, 427, 8. Remington, 124, 5, 35, 224, 7, 88, 375, 94, 8. Reyle, 76. Rice, 36, 339. Richards, 11, 32, 110, 11,15. Richardson, 292, 310, 32, 36, 413, 14, 31-33. Riedesel, 168, 427. Riorden, 329. Robbins, 59, 76, 140, 3, 263, 407. Roberts, 36,
. Hayman. Legg. Mico. Nowell. Oliver. Parsons. Quincy. Rainsborough. Salstonstall. Sewall. Shepard. Tyng. Watson. Eldred, 540. Eliot, 540. Bowles. Gookin. Quincy. Soden. Swati. Willett. Elmer, 540. Ely, 540. Ens Mullett. Munroe. Oakes. Paine. Parker. Plummer. Quincy. Savage. Sewall. Sherman. Smith. Stone. Stratton.Moore. Munroe. Myrick. Perry. Phillips. Prentice. Quincy. Rand. Randall. Remington. Robbins. Russell. Smit Holman. Hooker. Leverett. Lynde. Mitchell. Pond. Quincy. Touteville. Tucker. Tyng. Wigglesworth. Sherborne, Hyde. Meacham. Metcalf. Moore. Munroe. Phillips. Quincy. Remington. Russell. Sackett. Sharp. Shove. Sprageton. Coolidge. Hill. Hooker. Leverett. Mitchell. Quincy. Sewall. Shepard. Sparhawk. Wilcox, 691. Bancroft.