hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 34 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
pon, and in time it came to seem to him one of the least effective. A dim prefiguring of the axe whose strokes were to make the tree tremble to its crown, is to be found in the first volume of the Liberator. Mr. Garrison had a perfectly just understanding of the pro-slavery guarantees of the United States Constitution, and of the powers of the Federal Government over the institution of slavery. His incessant demand for emancipation in the District of Columbia, which he was amazed that John Quincy Lib. 1.207. Adams, then a member of the House of Representatives, should refuse to countenance; his proposal to agitate Lib. 1.121. for the abrogation of the slave-representation clause of the Constitution; his conviction that the Constitution Lib. 1.66, and passim. had only to be invoked through the Supreme Court to secure the free people of color against the oppressive enactments of the Southern States; his mention, with Lib. 1.34. only moral censure, of the employment of Fe
C. 1653, was ordained at Chs. 13 Ap. 1659, and d. of small-pox 22 Dec. 1677, a. 42. He well sustained the reputation inherited from his father, fell a victim to his own faithfulness in visiting his flock when wasting away by infectious disease, and was deeply lamented by the people of his charge, and by the community. Mr. Shepard m. Hannah (or Anna), dau. of William Tyng 3 Nov. 1656, and had Thomas, b.--July 1658; Anna, b. 8 Sept. 1663, m. Daniel Quincy 9 Nov. 1682, and was mother of Hon. John Quincy, for many years Speaker of the House of Representatives, a Councillor, and ancestor of the late President John Quincy Adams; Margaret. His w. Anna d. at the house of her granddaughter Holman, in Milton, 5 Aug. 1709, and was buried at Chs. in the tomb with her husband and son. 5. Samuel, s. of Thomas (1), was prob. brought up by his grandfather, Rev. Thomas Hooker, at Hartford; grad. H. C. 1658, ordained at Rowley 15 Nov. 1665, and d. 7 Ap. 1668, a. 26. His son Samuel, bap. 25 Aug.
C. 1653, was ordained at Chs. 13 Ap. 1659, and d. of small-pox 22 Dec. 1677, a. 42. He well sustained the reputation inherited from his father, fell a victim to his own faithfulness in visiting his flock when wasting away by infectious disease, and was deeply lamented by the people of his charge, and by the community. Mr. Shepard m. Hannah (or Anna), dau. of William Tyng 3 Nov. 1656, and had Thomas, b.--July 1658; Anna, b. 8 Sept. 1663, m. Daniel Quincy 9 Nov. 1682, and was mother of Hon. John Quincy, for many years Speaker of the House of Representatives, a Councillor, and ancestor of the late President John Quincy Adams; Margaret. His w. Anna d. at the house of her granddaughter Holman, in Milton, 5 Aug. 1709, and was buried at Chs. in the tomb with her husband and son. 5. Samuel, s. of Thomas (1), was prob. brought up by his grandfather, Rev. Thomas Hooker, at Hartford; grad. H. C. 1658, ordained at Rowley 15 Nov. 1665, and d. 7 Ap. 1668, a. 26. His son Samuel, bap. 25 Aug.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Why the Confederate States did not have a Supreme Court. (search)
t the Constitution, the measure of its own powers; but as in all cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infraction as of the mode and measure of redress. On this platform Mr. Jefferson was elected President in 1800, overthrowing John Adams and the Federal party. It was the corner-stone of the Democratic faith, and the government was administered on it in the main from 8000 to 1861, excepting the intersigna of John Quincy, of Andrew Jackson, and of Millard Filmore. The national Democratic conventions affirmed it time and again. But John Marshall, in the Supreme Court, steadily enlarged the delegated power of the common agent, and the northern people generally lost sight of the nature of the Federal government, and, applying the principle of the resolutions of 1798, in the case of secession, set itself up to judge for itself, as well of infraction as of the mode and measure of redress. Mr. Calhoun wrot
1 2