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f serviceable blue cloth and their pants of blue flannel. Since the men first went into camp at West Roxbury, they have been put through the most rigid discipline, and are therefore now prepared to meet the enemy under any circumstances. The camp equipage of the regiment, consisting of twenty-five wagons and one hundred horses, left in advance of the troops during the afternoon. Each company is supplied with three thousand ball cartridges and seven days rations. The officers seem to have been well chosen. Among those in command of companies are sons of the late Rufus Choate, Thomas G. Cary, and the lion. Josiah Quincy, Jr. The staff are all well mounted. Capt. Thomas, or the French lady who a short time previously captured the steamer St. Nicholas on the Patuxent River, was himself captured by the Baltimore police.--(Doc. 74.) The De Kalb Regiment N. Y. S. V., under the command of Colonel Leopold von Gilsa, left New York for the scat of war.--N. Y. Evening Post, July 8.
200 of the Illinois Sixteenth, and about 100 of the Hannibal Home Guards, was attacked by 1,600 secessionists, under Brigadier-General Harris. Although the Federals were surprised, they repelled the attack, drove the rebels back, killed four, and wounded several, besides capturing five prisoners and seven horses. Harris retreated to Monroe, where another skirmish occurred, in which the rebels were again repulsed. Smith then took up a position and sent messengers for reinforcements from Quincy.--Baltimore American, July 12.--(Doc. 76 1/2.) The Seventh Massachusetts Regiment, under command of Colonel D. N. Couch, left Taunton, Mass., this afternoon for the seat of war.--N. Y. Evening Post, July 10. The New Orleans True Delta of to-day has two characteristic articles, containing bold denunciations of the rebel leaders. One refers to the contemplated assembling of the Congress of the Confederate States in Richmond on the 20th inst., of the future of which no very sanguine
e good sense than consistency, concludes: I confess, then, I think it important, in the present case, to set an example against broad construction, by appealing for new power to the people. If, however, our friends shall think differently, certainly I shall acquiesce with satisfaction; confiding, that the good sense of our country will correct the evil of construction when it shall produce ill effects. When, in 1811, the Territory of Orleans was moulded into the State of Louisiana, Mr. Josiah Quincy, a young and very ardent Federalist who then represented the city of Boston in the House, indulged in what resembled very closely a menace of contingent secession; and similar fulminations were uttered by sundry New England Federalists under the pressure of Mr. Jefferson's Embargo and of the War of 1812. The famous but unsavory Hartford Convention, For proceedings of this Convention, see Niles's Register, January 14, 1815. held near the close of that war, and by which the ruin of t
5, 1798.Samuel Sewall49. Nov. 3, 1800.Nathan Reed83. Nov. 1, 1802.John Q. Adams95.  William Eustice18. Nov. 1804.Josiah Quincy100.  William Eustice31. Nov. 3, 1806.Josiah Quincy58.  James Prince22. Nov. 7, 1808.Josiah Quincy120.  William JJosiah Quincy58.  James Prince22. Nov. 7, 1808.Josiah Quincy120.  William Jarvis24. Nov. 5, 1810.Josiah Quincy96.  David Tilden18. Nov. 2, 1812.Asahel Stearns72.  William M. Richardson11. Nov. 7, 1814.Asahel Stearns191.  Samuel Dana17. Nov. 4, 1816.Asahel Stearns150.  Timothy Fuller20. Nov. 2, 1818.Samuel P. P. FaJosiah Quincy120.  William Jarvis24. Nov. 5, 1810.Josiah Quincy96.  David Tilden18. Nov. 2, 1812.Asahel Stearns72.  William M. Richardson11. Nov. 7, 1814.Asahel Stearns191.  Samuel Dana17. Nov. 4, 1816.Asahel Stearns150.  Timothy Fuller20. Nov. 2, 1818.Samuel P. P. Fay55.  Timothy Fuller11. Nov. 6, 1820.Samuel P. P. Fay34.  Timothy Fuller32. Nov. 4, 1822.Timothy Fuller37. Nov. 1, 1824.Edward Everett84.  John Keyes33. Nov. 6, 1826.Edward Everett60. Nov. 3, 1828.Edward Everett100.  Luke Fishe64. Nov. 1, Josiah Quincy96.  David Tilden18. Nov. 2, 1812.Asahel Stearns72.  William M. Richardson11. Nov. 7, 1814.Asahel Stearns191.  Samuel Dana17. Nov. 4, 1816.Asahel Stearns150.  Timothy Fuller20. Nov. 2, 1818.Samuel P. P. Fay55.  Timothy Fuller11. Nov. 6, 1820.Samuel P. P. Fay34.  Timothy Fuller32. Nov. 4, 1822.Timothy Fuller37. Nov. 1, 1824.Edward Everett84.  John Keyes33. Nov. 6, 1826.Edward Everett60. Nov. 3, 1828.Edward Everett100.  Luke Fishe64. Nov. 1, 1830.Edward Everett72.  James Russell30. Nov. 10, 1832.No Record  Nov. 10, 1834.Samuel Hoar109.  Heman Lincoln35.  James Russell110. Nov. 14, 1836.William Parmenter164.  Samuel Hoar125. Nov. 12, 1838.William Parmente
ton172 372 Sch.EugeneT. Magoun'sH. EwellParker, Cook, and othersProvincetown100 373 BrigPaulinaT. Magoun'sH. EwellE. Flinn and othersChatham190 374 BrigLaurettaT. Magoun'sH. EwellR. A. Cook and others 150 375 ShipSupplyT. Magoun'sH. EwellW. W. GoddardBoston547 376 ShipSaxonvilleSprague & James'sJohn TaylorNathaniel FrancisBoston430 377 ShipOrissaSprague & James'sJohn TaylorAtkinson & RollinsBoston530 3781847ShipKate HoweSprague & James'sJohn TaylorBramhall & HoweBoston608 379 BarkJosiah QuincySprague & James'sJ. T. FosterBramhall & HoweBoston480 380 ShipGertrudeSprague & James'sJ. T. FosterHussey & MurrayNew York800 381 BarkNashuaSprague & James'sJ. T. FosterJ. H. PearsonBoston200 382 BarkHannah ThorntonJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisJ. A. McGawBoston385 383 BarkKeplerJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisParsons & HoughBoston425 384 BarkSherwoodJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisWilliam LincolnBoston438 385 Sch.Joshua HamblenJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisThomas HopkinsChatham70 386 ShipHele
d. c. 1795. 39-76John Tufts m.--------, and had--  76-131John.  132Peter. d. unm. 39-77HUTCHINSON Tufts, who d. Aug. 2, 1800, m. Mary Grover, and had--  77-133Hutchinson, b, Dec. 16, 1769.  134Mary, m. Jonathan Locke. 39-78Francis Tufts m., successively, two sisters named Lunt, and had--  78-135Francis, moved to Maine.  136John.  137Benjamin, moved to Ohio.  138William.  139Mary, m. Mr. Hopkinson. 55-91COTTON Tufts, of Weymouth, m. Mercy Brooks, Mar. 6, 1788, and had--  91-140Quincy, is a merchant in Boston.  141Lucy, m. Thomas Tarbell.  142Susan.  143Mercy. 65-104Daniel Tufts m. Abigail Tufts, and had--  104-144Daniel, b. Dec. 31, 1776.  145Gilbert, b. Apr. 27, 1778.  146Charles, b. 1781.  147Nathan, b. Mar., 1786. 65-105AMOS Tufts m. Deborah Frothingham, and had--  105-148Amos, d., aged 14.  149Deborah, b. 1789; m. Mr. Frothingham.  150Joseph F., b. 1790; d. 1854.  151Mary, b. 1793; m. James P. McIntyre.  152Abigail, d., aged 12.  153Nat
31. Patch family, 532. Paterson, 533. Patten family, 533. Pauperism, 441. Peirce family, 533. Pemberton, 36. Pepperrell, 538. Perkins, 534. Perry, 534. Physicians, 302. Pierpont, 262, 312. Polly, 151, 534. Ponds, 5. Population, 451. Post Office, 421. Porter family, 534. Porter, 36, 49, 51, 52, 211, 309. Pounds, 449. Prices Current, 400. Pritchard, 36. Productions, 12. Putnam, 151, 306. Public Buildings, 325. Pynchon, 4. Quincy, 4, 73. Railroads, 57. Raleigh, Sir, Walter, 17. Raymond family, 535. Real Estate, Sales of, 44. Records, Town and Church, 28, 29. Reed, 535. Reeves family, 535. Reeves, 36, 106, 449, 560. Register of Vessels, 368, et seq. Representatives, 168. Revil, 31. Richardson, 537. Roads, 50. Rowse, 44. Royall family, 538. Royal, 4, 9, 49, 87, 170, 176, 224, 265, 355, 482, 570. Russell, 34, 36, 41, 42, 43, 44. Sagamore John, 14, 32, 72, 73, 75, 76, 7
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
s a valuable auxiliary, which at the same time pleases and cultivates the taste of our people. The Magazine of American history, edited by John Austin Stevens, Esq., and published by A. S. Barnes & Co., New York, has been for several years one of our most valued exchanges. The December number contains interesting papers on The battle of Buena Vista, The case of Major Andre, The seventy-six stone house at Tappan, Arnold the Traitor and Andre the sufferer — correspondence between Josiah Quincy, Jared Sparks and Colonel Benjamin Tallmadge, and other articles of interest and value. We cannot agree to all that the distinguished editor writes (especially when he gets an opportunity of indulging his partisan bitterness against the South) and may take an early opportunity of expressing our dissent; but the Magazine is admirably edited, beautifully gotten up, and is of great interest to the general reader and value to the student of history. The Atlantic monthly, published
for withdrawal from the Union Northern precedents New England secessionists Cabot, Pickering, Quincy, etc. on the acquisition of Louisiana the Hartford convention the Massachusetts Legislature on state. In 1811, on the bill for the admission of Louisiana as a state of the Union, the Hon. Josiah Quincy, a member of Congress from Massachusetts, said: If this bill passes, it is my deliber, delegate from what was then the Mississippi territory, took exception to these expressions of Quincy, and called him to order. The Speaker (Varnum of Massachusetts) sustained Poindexter, and decidon of the Union was out of order. An appeal was taken from this decision, and it was reversed. Quincy proceeded to vindicate the propriety of his position in a speech of some length, in the course onant with obvious dangers and evils! It is to be remembered that these men—Cabot, Pickering, Quincy, and others—whose opinions and expressions have been cited, were not Democrats, misled by extrem
esented as the true interpretation, by the school of which Judge Story was the most effective founder. At an earlier period—but when he had already served for several years in Congress, and had attained the full maturity of his powers— Webster held the views which were presented in a memorial to Congress of citizens of Boston, December 15, 1819, relative to the admission of Missouri, drawn up and signed by a committee of which he was chairman, and which also included among its members Josiah Quincy. He speaks of the states as enjoying the exclusive possession of sovereignty over their own territory, calls the United States the American Confederacy, and says, The only parties to the Constitution, contemplated by it originally, were the thirteen confederated States. And again: As between the original States, the representation rests on compact and plighted faith; and your memorialists have no wish that that compact should be disturbed, or that plighted faith in the slightest degree
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