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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
d Gap and removing the stores. This was just what I wanted. On the evening of the 17th of June, General Carter L. Stevenson of the Confederate forces sent Colonel J. E. Rains to cover the evacuation of Cumberland Gap, The Confederate forces covering the mountain and river passes north of Knoxville at this time were under Gener0 effectives, well organized and mobilized, and in good condition for active service. The organization on the 3d of July was as follows: Second Brigade, Col. James E. Rains: 4th Tenn., Col. J. A. McMurry; 11th Tenn., Col. J. E. Rains; 42d Ga., Col. R. J. Henderson; 3d Ga. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. M. A. Stovall; 29th N. C., Col. RCol. J. E. Rains; 42d Ga., Col. R. J. Henderson; 3d Ga. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. M. A. Stovall; 29th N. C., Col. R. B. Vance; Ga. Battery, Capt. J. G. Yeiser. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. M. Barton; 30th Ala., Col. C. M. Shelley; 31st Ala., Col. D. R. Hundley; 40th Ga., Col. A. Johnson; 52d Ga., Col. W. Boyd; 9th Ga. Battalion, Maj. J. T. Smith; Va. Battery, Capt. Joseph W. Anderson. Fourth Brigade, Col. A. W. Reynolds: 20th Ala., Col. I. W.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
to Little Rock by General Holmes, in order to help organize the troops in that neighborhood for his expedition. He left Rains in command, with orders not to provoke an engagement. Matters remained quiet till the 30th of September, when General Frhed at once to the assistance of Salomon, and on the 4th of October reached Newtonia. Cooper and Shelby fell back toward Rains. Thereupon Schofield continued to advance, driving the Confederates before him out of Missouri and into the mountains of Arkansas. Thence Cooper continued to retreat toward the Indian Territory, while Rains made his way to Huntsville. Schofield sent Blunt in pursuit of Cooper, who was overtaken at Old Fort Wayne near Maysville on the 22d of October and completely rh on the 15th of October. Learning there of the disasters that had befallen his army, he hastened to the front, relieved Rains, assumed command himself, and was about to take a strong position near Fayetteville, whither reenforcements were hastenin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
New year. We had indeed routed the Federal right wing, but the bloody work was not over. During January 1st Rosecrans's army was intrenching itself, but General Bragg was of the opinion that their quiet meant a retreat. During the morning of the 2d (Friday) quiet prevailed, except some shelling on our right. At about noon General Bragg determined to dislodge the force on his right. Orders were given to that end, and our best troops were carefully selected. Hanson's, Brigadier-General James E. Rains, C. S. A., killed at Stone's River. From a photograph. Preston's, Gibson's, and Hunt's brigades, with Cobb's and Wright's batteries, were placed under Major-General Breckinridge. A gun fired by one of our batteries at 4 o'clock was the signal for the attack. After a fierce fight we carried the hill. The orders were to take its crest, and there remain intrenched. General Breckinridge endeavored to execute this order, but the commanders of the brigades engaged could not
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
Capt. Henry C. Semple. Brigade loss: k, 52; w, 339; m, 113 = 504. McCown's division (of Kirby Smith's corps, serving with Hardee), Maj.-Gen. J. P. McCown. First Brigade (serving as infantry), Brig.-Gen. M. D. Ector: 10th Tex. Cav., Col. M. F. Locke; 11th Tex. Cav., Col. J. C. Burks (m w), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Bounds; 14th Tex. Cav., Col. J. L. Camp; 15th Tex. Cav., Col. J. A. Andrews; Tex. Battery, Capt. J. P. Douglas. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 276; m, 48 = 352. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James E. Rains (k), Col. R. B. Vance: 3d Ga. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. M. A. Stovall; 9th Ga. Battalion, Maj. Joseph T. Smith; 29th N. C., Col. R. B. Vance; 11th Tenn., Col. G. W. Gordon (w), Lieut.-Col. William Thedford; Ala. Battery (Eufaula Light Art'y), Lieut. W. A. McDuffie. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 161; m, 18 = 199. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Evander McNair, Col. R. W. Harper; 1st Ark. Mt'd Rifles (dismounted), Col. R. W. Harper, Maj. L. M. Ramsaur (w); 2d Ark. Mt'd Rifles (dismounted), Lieut.-
. Reports. No. 1.-Col. Samuel P. Carter, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. No. 3.-Col. James E. Rains, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Col. Samuel P. Carter, U. S. Army. headquarters Twelfth Brigade, Camp Cumberrby Smith, C. S. Army. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., March 30, 1862. General: Col. J. E. Rains, commanding the post at Cumberland Gap, reports that on the evening of the 21st instant the enemy drove in the picke E. Kirby Smith, Major-General, Commanding. General S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S. Army. No. 3.-reports of Col. James E. Rains, C. S. Army. headquarters, Cumberland Gap, March 22, 1862. Sir: On yesterday evening, about dark, a party y and infantry. We have 2 wounded. We will whip the fight. Our men are in good spirits. Very respectfully, James E. rains, Colonel, Commanding Post. Maj. H. L. Clay, Assistant Adjutant-General, Knoxville, Tenn. headquarters, Cumberl
rable order and promptness with which the noble troops of my division marched out to meet a foe they had good reason to believe was much stronger numerically than themselves. And so I believed myself, but I felt the assurance of victory, though I did not underrate either the gallantry or skill of the enemy. Had Kirby Smith been personally in command we should have had a battle; but it was evident to me that the actual general in command felt uncertain of the ground upon which he stood. Rains, a gallant and dashing officer, was in our immediate front, and Barton was a few miles from our right flank, while Stevenson was in supporting distance. But on arriving at Thomas' we found that the enemy had retreated in hot haste, and after a short halt the march was resumed, and the advance brigade, under De Courcy, took possession of the Gap at about 2 o'clock p. m., the rear guard of the enemy having evacuated the fortress at 10 o'clock a. m. The same afternoon the national colors were
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Ohio, of operations from April 8 to June 10. headquarters Army of the Ohio, Huntsville, Ala., August 1, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the army under my command in the recent campaign against the enemy's forces at Corinth: The circumstances attending and following the battle of Shiloh subjected my troops to the greatest discomfort for some ten days after that event. Rains and use rendered the roads almost impassable, so that the wagons and baggage that had been left behind on the forced march which was made to reach the battle-field on the 6th and 7th of April arrived very slowly. The troops, therefore, had not only to live in the open air in miry camps and frequent cold, drenching rains, but to carry their provisions some 2 miles from the river to the camps over roads so muddy as to be difficult even for horses. These privations produced a serious effec
8,000 effective men; 4,000 are at Cumberland Gap, under Colonel Rains; about 2,000 are at this place; the remainder are scatt8,000 effective men; 4,000 are at Cumberland Gap, under Colonel Rains, commanding a Tennessee regiment from Nashville; 2,000 ce of not less than 10,000 at some central point.[?] Colonel Rains has a force of about 4,000 of the best troops in this dstrict of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 23, 1862. Col. James E. Rains, Cumberland Gap, Tenn.: Colonel: Your dispatches strict of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 23, 1862. Col. James E. Rains, Commanding Post, Cumberland Gap, Tenn.: Colonel:strict of East Tennessee, Knoxville, March 23, 1862. Col. James E. Rains, Commanding, &c., Cumberland Gap, Tenn.: Colonel:ral S. Cooper, Adjutant-General C. S. Army: General: Colonel Rains, in command of Cumberland Gap, reports this morning tha 4th Tennessee, Col. J. A. McMurry.  11th Tennessee, Col. J. E. Rains.31st Alabama, Col. D. R. Hundley. 36th Tennessee, Co
II. Missouri--Arkansas. Price returns to Missouri guerrilla operations Rains and Stein routed capture of Milford Price retreats to Arkansas Sigel's retreat from Bentonville battle of Pea Ridge Rebels defeated the War among the Inollected and equipped an adequate force, at length demonstrated Dec. 15. against the Rebels occupying Lexington, under Rains and Stein, compelling them to abandon the line of the Missouri, and retreat southward. Having, by forced marches and histh the residue of his army, made a forced march over White River Mountains, to a point 8 miles west of Huntsville, where Rains had encamped the day before. His advance was next morning pushed forward into Huntsville, whence a few Rebel cavalry fled at his approach. He here learned that Rains was retreating across the mountains to Ozark, resolved not to fight until reenforcements should arrive, and that further pursuit would be useless; so he retraced his steps, via Bentonville, to Cross Hol
, 1,400 wounded, and 372 missing; total, 2,228. No official account of the Rebel losses In this engagement is at hand; but the Richmond Ditpatch of May 8th has a bulletin, professedly based on an official dispatch from Gen. Johnston, which, claiming 11 cannon and 623 prisoners captured, admits a Rebel loss of but 220; yet names Gen. Anderson, of North Carolina, Col. Mott, of Mississippi, Col. Ward, 4th Florida, and Col. Winm. H. Palmer, 1st Virginia, as among the killed; and Gen. Early, Gen. Rains, Col. Kemper, 7th Virginia, Col. Corse, 17th Virginia, and Col Garland, of Lynchburg, as wounded; adding: The 1st Virginia was badly cut up. Out of 200 men in the fight, some 80 or 90 are reported killed or wounded. Col. Kemper's regiment suffered terribly, though we have no account of the extent of the casualties. These items indicate a total loss of certainly not less than 1,000. Many of those prisoners, knowing that we had an overwhelming force just at hand, confidently looked for rec
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