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The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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l article, and the best you ever smoked. It is real, pure Lynchburg-brown, free from stems, and perfumed with the native aroma of the weed. Smoke, guest of mine! That brand is warranted to drive off all blue-devils — to wrap the soul in Elysian dreams of real Java coffee, English boots, French wines, and no blockade. There are men, I am told, who don't smoke. I pity ‘em! How do they sustain existence, or talk or think? All real philosophers use the magical weed; and I always thought Raleigh, when I used to read about him, the most sensible man of his time, because he smoked. I have no doubt Shakespeare carried a pipe about, and wrote his plays with it in his mouth. I'll trouble you to hand me that chunk when you are done with it. Thank you. Now the summit glows; the mysterious depths are illumined. All right; I am lit. This is soothing; all care departs when you smoke a good pipe. Existence assumes a smiling and bright aspect; all things are rose-coloured. I find m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of batteries Gregg and Whitworth, and the Evacuation of Petersburg. (search)
m in Raleigh, North Carolina, a few weeks before, and on the eve of returning to the army. Gov. Vance introduced us, and requested me to look after him. He had run the blockade on the Owl, destined for Wilmington. On coming within easy range of Fort Fisher, the Confederate flag was not seen, but in its place waved the stars and stripes. It had been captured a few days before. The Owl made its escape, and landed Mr. Conley and two other passengers a short distance below, from which place Raleigh was reached without difficulty. On board the Owl was a full set of horse equipments, saddle, bridle, &c., for Gen. Lee and each member of his staff, presents from Mr. Conley. They were never received. We reached Richmond together. He was kindly received, and seemed much gratified at it. He made me three visits in my winter quarters near Petersburg, called to see Gen. Lee, dined with him, and secured one of his photographs. He was greatly delighted when I asked him to ride with me along
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
repeatedly, and solemnly rejected by President Lincoln, and better terms than the rebels had ever asked in their most prosperous condition. 9th. It formed no basis of true and lasting peace, but relieved rebels from the presence of our victorious armies, and left them in a condition to renew their efforts to overthrow the United States Government and subdue the loyal States whenever their strength was recruited and any opportunity should offer. General Grant was immediately sent to Raleigh to declare the rejection of the Memorandum, to relieve General Sherman of command if he should think it best to do so, and to direct an immediate and general resumption of hostilities. When Grant reached Morehead City, he telegraphed to Sherman the decision of the Government. Pressing forward he reached Sherman's Headquarters, at Raleigh, on the morning of the 24th, April, 1865. and directed that officer to communicate the decision of the Government to Johnston, immediately, and notify h
have a perfectly secure retreat down the Peninsula upon Fort Monroe, with our flanks perfectly covered by the fleet. During the whole movement our left flank is covered by the water. Our right is secure, for the reason that the enemy is too distant to reach us in time: he can only oppose us in front; we bring our fleet into full play. After a successful battle, our position would be — Burnside forming our left, Norfolk held securely, our centre connecting Burnside with Buell both by Raleigh and Lynchburg, Buell in Eastern Tennessee and North Alabama, Halleck at Nashville and Memphis. The next movement would be to connect with Sherman on the left, by reducing Wilmington and Charleston; to advance our centre into South Carolina and Georgia; to push Buell either towards Montgomery or to unite with the main army in Georgia; to throw Halleck southward to meet the naval expedition from New Orleans. We should then be in a condition to reduce at our leisure all the Southern sea-
The North Carolina Legislature.--It will be remembered that the first Southern papers received here after the capture of Fort Hatteras spoke of the disgraceful behavior of the North Carolina Legislature, and refused to report it. The Daily Times of this morning has information from Raleigh stating that the Legislature was in session when the capture was announced, and that the Union men rose in their places, and cheered and swung their hats, and were so noisy in their rejoicings that all business was for the time suspended. The same feeling, to a considerable extent, pervaded the people of that city. No wonder that the secessionist papers were unwilling to chronicle such behavior.--Albany Journal, Oct. 8.
have a perfectly secure retreat down the Peninsula upon Fort Monroe, with our flanks perfectly covered by the fleet. During the whole movement our left flank is covered by the water. Our right is secure, for the reason that the enemy is too distant to reach us in time; he can only oppose us in front. We bring our fleet into full play. After a successful battle our position would be — Burnside forming our left; Norfolk held securely: our centre connecting Burnside with Buell, both by Raleigh and Lynchburg; Buell in Eastern Tennessee and North Alabama; Halleck at Nashvilie and Memphis. The next movement would be to connect with Sherman on the left by reducing Wilmington and Charleston; to advance our centre into South Carolina and Georgia; to push Buell either towards Montgomery or to unite with the main army in Georgia; to throw Halleck southward to meet the naval expedition from New Orleans. We should then be in a condition to reduce at our leisure all the Southern seapo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
associations, and proud memories of noble men, brave deeds and costly sacrifices. It was in Raleigh that I entered the Confederate army, at the outset of the War Between the States, as Adjutant of the 22d North Carolina Regiment under the peerless Pettigrew. In this city my family found refuge and welcome after the occupation of Newburn by the Federal forces, and here I returned after the sad end near Hillsboro when Johnston surrendered to Sherman. My life as a soldier is associated with Raleigh, and it is most grateful to speak to her people—among whom I number many friends and some contemporaries—of those far off, stirring days of great events in 1861-865. On the Feast of All Saints' Day, which according to the Christian calendar, occurs on the first of November, a beautiful custom is observed in Europe and in parts of this country. The day is kept as a holiday, and many persons, laying aside their cares of life, repair to the burial place of their dead and decorate their gra
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
Minnigerode, Louisville, Ky.—Served on Mobile Station. William Pinckney Mason, Rockville, Md.—Born in Virginia; midshipman U. S. N., lieutenant C. S. N.; served on receiving ship United States, steamer Jamestown, battle of Hampton Roads, battery at Hardy's Bluff, naval battle of Drewry's Bluff, steamer Richmond, abroad, steamer Virginia No. 2; wounded by piece of shell. S. Marco, Darlington, S. C.—Landsman, served in 2nd North Carolina Regiment; transferred to navy, served on steamer Raleigh and at yard, Wilmington, N. C. W. D. Olivera, Goodall, Fla.—Seaman, served on steamer Resolute. Roger Pinckney, McPhersonville, S. C.—Midshipman C. S. N., and passed midshipman C. S. N.; served on Savannah Station, Drewry's Bluff, schoolship Patrick Henry and steamer Virginia No. 2. Thos. C. Pinckney, San Francisco, Cal.—Midshipman C. S. N., and passed midshipman C. S. N.; served with 5th Regiment South Carolina troops; served on receiving ship United States at capture of U. S
Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina a city of 20,000 pop., on Cape Fear River, 34 miles from the sea. Extensively engaged in commerce and manufactures. Railroads connect with Raleigh and Weldon, and Manchester, S. C. The largest city in the state.
the Judges of Charles I., has collected the materials on this subject. Papers relating to it may be found in the Dutch records. What need of referring to Hutch. Hist. vol. i., to the papers in Hutch. Coll., to Crown's deposition, in Chalmers, 263, 264? John Dixwell was more fortunate. He was able to live undiscovered, and, changing his name, was absorbed among the inhabitants of New Haven. He Chap. XI.} married, and lived peacefully and happily. The History of the World, which Raleigh had written in imprisonment, with the sentence of death hanging over his head, was the favorite study of the man whom the laws of England had condemned to the gallows; and he ever retained a firm belief that the spirit of English liberty would demand a new revolution, which was achieved in England a few months before his end, and of which the earliest rumors may have reached his death-bed. Dixwell died March 18, 1689, aged 81. Three of the regicides, who had escaped to Holland, found
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