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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 11, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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s Latane, the sweet caress of his Stuart and the bugle-blast of his Coercion and Word with the West, had assured John R. Thompson's fame. The liltful refrain of Maryland, my Maryland echoed from the Potomac to the Gulf; and the clarion-call James R. Randall so nobly used-There's life in the old land yet! warmed every southern heart, by the dead ashes on its hearth. Who does not remember Beechenbrook, that pure Vestal in the temple of Mars? Every tear of sympathy that fell upon its pages was eathes that high spirit of hope and trust, held by that warrior people; and, not alone the finest war dirge of the South, it is excelled by no sixteen lines in any language, for power, lilt and tenderness! Perhaps Thompson's Dirge for Ashby, Randall's song of triumph over dead John Pelham and Mrs. Margaret Preston's Ashby, may rank side-by-side next to the Jackson. The modest author of the last-named did not claim it, until the universal voice of her people called for her name; and it is
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
our citizens. For more than three years the conspirators were deceived by the belief that Maryland was their ally in heart, but was made powerless by military despotism; and her refugee sons were continually calling with faith, in the spirit of Randall's popular lyric:-- Dear Mother! burst the tyrant's chain, Maryland! Virginia should not call in vain, Maryland! She meets her sisters on the plain; Sic Semper, 'tis the proud refrain That baffles minions back again, Maryland! Arise in majesty again, Maryland! my Maryland! Written by James R. Randall, at Point Coupee, Louisiana, on the 26th of April, 1861. It contains nine stanzas, and was very popular throughout the “Confederacy.” It was successfully parodied by a loyal writer, after Lee's invasion of Maryland. The delusion was dispelled when, in the summer of 1863, Lee invaded Maryland, with the expectation of receiving large accessions to his army in that State, but lost by desertion far more than he gained by recruitin
36. there's life in the old land yet! by Jas. R. Randall, of Baltimore. Author of Maryland, my Maryland. By blue Patapsco's billowy dash, The tyrant's war-shout comes, Along with the cymbal's fitful clash, And the growl of his sullen drums. We hear it! we heed it, with vengeful thrills, And we shall not forgive or forget; There's faith in the streams, there's hope in the hills, There's life in the old land yet! Minions! we sleep, but we are not dead; We are crushed, we are scourged, we are scarred; We crouch--'tis to welcome the triumph tread Of the peerless Beauregard. Then woe to your vile, polluting horde When the Southern braves are met, There's faith in the victor's stainless sword, There is life in the old land yet! Bigots! ye quell not the valiant mind, With the clank of an iron chain, The spirit of freedom sings in the wind, O'er Merryman, Thomas, and Kane; And we, though we smite not, and not thralls, We are piling a gory debt; While down by McHenry's dungeon-walls, T
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
cessional. From the Civil War period the lapse of time and popular consent have elected to preserve a few other melodies, and incidentally the words attached to them, unless these have been displaced by later versions. George F. Root's Battle cry of freedom and Tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, Henry Clay Work's Marching through Georgia, and Patrick S. Gilmore's When Johnny comes marching home are examples of original words and music; See, also, Book III, Chap. II. and James R. Randall's Maryland, See, also, Book III, Chap. III of the successful setting of words to a favourite melody—this time the German Tannenbaum. But they are not genuinely national songs. Maryland belongs, of course, to a state; the others are all marching songs, widely played by bands, occasionally resorted to at patriotic exercises, and kept alive chiefly by their use with special words in colleges, fraternities, and other social groups. Since the Civil War there has been no significant
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
5, 527 Quincy, Josiah, 519 Quintilian, 471 Qui perd gagne, 592 R. T., 427 Rabbi Ben Ezra, 111 Radcliffe, Mrs., 541 Radical empiricism, 249 Radical reformer, the, 437 Rae, John, 434 Rafinesque, C. S., 619 Rafn, C. C., 473 Rag baby, a, 279 Raguet, Condy, 438 Railroad corral, the, 514 Railroads, their origin and problems, 198 Railroad transportation, 442 Railway Tariffs, 443 Ralph, Julian, 165 Ralstons, the, 88 Ramona, 86, 89 Ramsay, David, 179 Randall, J. R., 497 Randolph, John, 453 Randolph, Innes, 515 Randolph Macon College, 339, 465 n., 479 Ratgeber, 579 Rational psychology, 228 Rattermann, H. A., 581, 587 Rattlesnake—a ranch-haying song, 514 Ratzel, 579 Rauschenbusch, Walter, 215, 216 n. Ravage, M. E., 421 Rawle, Francis, 427 Raymond, Daniel, 431 Raymond, H. J., 309 Raymond, H. T., 322 Raymond, John T., 271 Read, T. Buchanan, 38, 40, 48 Reader (Webster), 475 Reading Adler, 576 Reagan, John H., 3
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
land I'll take my stand, and live and die for Dixie would burst from the throng and make indistinct vibrations on the outer air. At one of these mystic meetings of the faithful at the Winns house, on Monument street, the messenger produced James R. Randall's grand war song—My Maryland. It was read aloud and reread until sobs and inarticulate moans choked utterance. Hetty Carey was then in the prime of her first youth, with a perfect figure, exquisite complexion, the hair that Titian loved tost beautiful woman of the day and perhaps the most beautiful that Maryland has ever produced. Her sister, Jenny Carey, was next to her in everything, but Hetty Carey had no peer. While this little coterie of beautiful women were throbbing over Randall's heroic lines, Hetty Carey said: That must be sung. Jenny, get an air for it! and Jenny at the piano struck the chorus of the college song, Gaudeamus igitur, and the great war anthem, Maryland, My Maryland, was born into the world. It went t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
d died in pedagogic harness, in the golden prime of manhood. Peace be with him and with his spirit, for he was a grand character, and never was there a bolder spirit in a more loyal breast. In reviewing some of the passages in the life of General Whiting, I have striven to be just to him as well as to Mr. Davis and General Bragg. The one fault of Whiting was so magnificently atoned for, that it will not dim the lustre of his true glory. He merits all of the honor that his admirers claim for him, without seeking to injure his superiors or compeers, and nothing so became him as his heroic end, which was peaceful, resigned, and pathetically courageous. Napoleon said at St. Helena, that the misfortunes he finally encountered were necessary to give sublimity and roundness to his character. Relatively, we may say the same of General Whiting, and trust that the Southern people, and especially North Carolinians, will some day make his memory monumental and sublime. James R. Randall.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
fantry, Organization and record of, 237 Old Dominion Dragoons, Roll of, 187. Ox Hill, Battle of, 331. Parrott, W. A., 115. Pawnee, The Federal gunboat, 90. Perry, Leslie J., 145. 301. Pettigrew, General J., 16, 260. Pickett, General George E., Appointment of to West Point; his characteristics, 151. Pickett, Mrs. La Salle Corbeil, 154. Polk, General, Leonidas, 130. Pope, Movements in the war of General John, 353. Pouncing on pickets, 213. Powell, C. H., 359. Randall, James R., 277 Rawlins, General John A., 154. Ray, Rev. George H., 365. Reams' Station, Battle of, 103, 337. Rebels, benefactors of the world, 368. Reconstruction in Texas. 41. Reynolds, Captain, Albert, 205 Richardson Guards, Madison county, Company A, 7th Virginia Infantry, Roll of, 361. Richardson, General William H., 363. Riddell, Dr. Thomas J., 323. Roane, Lieutenant, killed, 207. Roanoke Grays, Muster-roll and casualties of, 291. Roller, A. H., 294. Ruggles
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
The gallant Pelham. [from the Mobile, Ala., register, May 20, 1894.] Jeb Stuart's boy artillerist from Alabama. How John Pelham, by his skill and courage, wrote his name high on the temple of fame. John Pelham. (by James R. Randall.) Just as the Spring came laughing throa the strife, With all her gorgeous cheer— In the glad April of historic life— Fell the great cannoneer. The wondrous lulling of a hero's breath His bleeding country weeps; Hushed—in th' alabaster arms of Death thy boy, 'mid princes of the sky, Among the Southern dead. How must he smile on this dull world beneath, Fevered with swift renown— He, with the martyr's amaranthine wreath Twining the victor's crown! N. B.—This is the original version from Randall's manuscript.— T. C. D. No one can be accused justly of raking amid the ashes of the past to rekindle the fires of sectional prejudice when he undertakes to briefly sketch one of the many brilliant careers during the late war that illus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
s in, 135. Negro, The, Problem, 337. Newbern, Federal fleet at, 205. Nicholls, General F. T., 284. Nightingale, Florence, 228. North, Inconsistency of the, 82. O'Ferrall. Hon. C. T., 260. Ould, Hon., Robert, 84. Palmer, colonel, Wm. H., 112. Parker. Theodore, 25. Parsons, Capture of the Philo, 261. Passy, Frederick 227. Patteson, Captain, Camm, 154. Payne, General, Wm. H.. 144. Pegram, General, John, 105. Pelham. Charles Thomas, 345 Major John, Lines to by J. R. Randall, Sketch of his career, 338. Pelham and Breathed's Battery, Roll of, 348. Pender, General W. D. 112. Pendleton, Major A. S., killed, 372. Perryville, Battle of, 238 Peters, Colonel W. E., 218, his noble conduct at Chambersburg, Pa., 266; Winfield, 116. Phi Beta Kappa Society, 1. Philip II and William of Orange, 30. Piatt, Donn, 103. Porter, General, Fitz John, 147; Constructor J. L., 207. Price, Major R. C., killed, 110. Prisons, Northern and Southern, 29, 2
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