Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for George W. Randolph or search for George W. Randolph in all documents.

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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
rsey, M. J. Hawkins, Jacob Parrott, Thirty-third Ohio Regiment. All of Sill's brigade, Buell's division. Respectfully forwarded to General Slaughter. G. W. Lee, Commanding Post. headquarters, Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 16, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.: Sir: Your communication 11th instant is duly to hand. In reply I have respectfully to say that the arrest, incarceration, trial, and execution of the prisoners you refer to occurred before I took chaged with the arrangements for the proper execution thereof. By command of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith: J. F. Belton, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. To Commanding officer of post at Atlanta, Ga. Atlanta G, GASeptember 16, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.: dear sir: Your letter of September 11, 1862, to Major Lee, provostmarshal, has been shown me by him, and, as far as I am acquainted with the matter, General Smith only sent from Knoxville instruct
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 3-5, 1862.-evacuation of Fort Pillow, Tenn., by the Confederates and its occupation by the Union forces. (search)
ces had all lefttwo of their gunboats only an hour or two before we approached. The people seemed to respect the flag which Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet planted. The guns had been dismantled and some piles of cotton were burning. I shall leave Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet here in the advance, and return immediately to Fort Pillow to bring on my entire force. The people attribute the suddenness of the evacuation to the attempt made night before last to sink one of their gunboats at Fort Pillow. Randolph, like Fort Pillow, is weak, and could not have held out long against a vigorous attack. The people express a desire for the restoration of the old order of things, though still professing to be secessionists. Chas. Ellet, Jr., Colonel, Commanding Ram Flotilla. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Washington, June 7, 1862. Col. Charles Ellet, Jr., Commander of Ram Fleet on the Mississippi (via Cairo): Your several dispatches have been received and your proceedings cordially approv
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.-naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
e was occasioned by a misapprehension of orders or misinformation as to the surrounding circumstances. The evacuation of Fort Pillow was, from all accounts, well and orderly conducted, after once determined upon, but by some means my men were sent to Memphis on a transport instead of being placed on the gun. boats. The circumstances which may have caused the evacuation of Fort Pillow did not surround Fort Randolph, and I am satisfied that, even with the few troops that were at Pillow, Randolph could have been held for several days, with a sure and safe retreat when necessary, if ever. Our fleet, for want of coal, as represented, fell back to Memphis on the 5th with the intention of returning to Island No.40. The arrangements for this purpose were being made, but before 10 o'clock p. m. on the 5th the tugs which were on picket above the city reported the enemy's tugs in sight. This was discredited, but our boats anchored in the channel of the river, prepared for a battle.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.--naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
with the Queen of the West close enough to invite the fire of the rebel guns, but received no shot, while very considerable smoke and flames indicated the burning of the property of the enemy. Before daylight Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet, at his own suggestion, went in a yawl with a small boats crew down to the fort, found it deserted, and planted the Stars and Stripes there. I followed almost simultaneously with a portion of my fleet. After a brief delay I proceeded with three vessels to Randolph and sent Lieutenant-Colonel Ellet ashore with a flag of truce. He there ascertained that the rebel forces had been hastily withdrawn the night before, after destroying their artillery, burning a good deal of cotton, and doing what other mischief they could in the short time they could venture to remain. Later in the day the gunboats under Commodore Davis moved down the Mississippi toward Memphis, while I collected my fleet and passed the night on the Tennessee shore some 18 miles above