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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
he Richmond Howitzer battalion, under Major George W. Randolph, and two companies of Virginia cavalrinning of the siege of Petersburg. Major George W. Randolph, who commanded the Confederate artillnstant with my regiment and four pieces of Major Randolph's battery from Yorktown, on the Hampton ro was made for its especial protection, and Major Randolph placed his guns so as to sweep all the apphem. A battery was laid out on it for one of Randolph's howitzers. We had only twenty-five spades,es his command was en route. I detached Major Randolph with one howitzer to join them, and Lieuteproaching rapidly and in good order, but when Randolph opened upon them at 9:15 their organization wptains, with their companies, crossed over to Randolph's Battery under a very heavy fire in a most gCaptain Ross was detained at the church, near Randolph's Battery. Captain Bridges, however, crossed, as may be attested by the order of General Randolph, then Secretary of War, now in my possession,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
of the Richmond Howitzer battalion, under Major George W. Randolph, and two companies of Virginia cavalry of e beginning of the siege of Petersburg. Major George W. Randolph, who commanded the Confederate artillery, 6th instant with my regiment and four pieces of Major Randolph's battery from Yorktown, on the Hampton road, tttery was made for its especial protection, and Major Randolph placed his guns so as to sweep all the approach of them. A battery was laid out on it for one of Randolph's howitzers. We had only twenty-five spades, six minutes his command was en route. I detached Major Randolph with one howitzer to join them, and Lieutenant-en approaching rapidly and in good order, but when Randolph opened upon them at 9:15 their organization was cowo captains, with their companies, crossed over to Randolph's Battery under a very heavy fire in a most gallanawn, Captain Ross was detained at the church, near Randolph's Battery. Captain Bridges, however, crossed over
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
observe your mistake in saying the position was held by the heroic men of the Virginia in the engagement at Drewry's Bluff on the 15th of May, 1862. The guns in the fort were in charge of soldiers for the most part drawn from the county of Chesterfield, who had been stationed there from the breaking of the first ground, contributing much from their own means and drawing largely upon their friends to assist in the work, and were under my command, as may be attested by the order of General Randolph, then Secretary of War, now in my possession, promoting me to major of artillery, and in the body of my appointment directing me to remain in command of Fort Drewry. It cannot be shown that the crew of the Virginia fired a shot from this fort on that occasion. It is true that the gallant Jackson, of the Patrick Henry, had casemated near the entrance to the fort an 8-inch gun, but much rain having fallen the previous night the ground became very soft and its whole superstructure fell in at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
the negroes of Southampton had risen, and were putting to death its white inhabitants without regard to age, sex, or condition, the troop, under command of Captain Randolph, marched on the instant, with full ranks, to the infected district. The Artillery Battery, Captain Richardson commanding, followed at slower gait. The Publ Nothing worthy of note occurred during the march of the Richmond troops southward, save this ludicrous incident, which was told me many years ago by one of Captain Randolph's men: Dick Gaines, the aforesaid black bugler, having gone beyond the troop as they were passing through a thick wood, fell unawares upon an ambush of paescape a volley, dashed wildly back to the troop, who, suspecting the cause of his discomfiture, greeted him with laughter, loud, long, and uproarious. When Captain Randolph, by forced marches, arrived at Jerusalem, the rising had been quelled, the rebels killed, captured, or dispersed. Their general was in hiding, but not long,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
at Hampton Roads, 177; what instructions at, 192, 342. Pegram's Farm, Battle at. 289. Pegram, Captain, C S. Navy, 208 Peters, Lieutenant, Winfield, 138, 243. Pickett, Colonel John T, 342. Pleasants, James, Gallantry of, 223. Pope, General John, Cruelty of, 103. Prather, F. W. S., killed, 143 Price, General, Sterling, 213. Prisoners, Treatment of, 125, 229, 234. Pulaski, Fort, Escape of Lieutenant W. W. George from, 229; officers at, 234. Rayner, Hon Kenneth, 37. Randolph, General George W., 201. Reams' Station, Battle of. 289. Rehel, a term of honor, 130. Richmond, Fall of, April 3, 1865, 152 Socially during the war, 151; Light Dragoons, Roll of, 366. Sabine Pass, Notable Battle of, 314. Salem Church as Hospital, 171. Sanders, Colonel C. C, 172. Saunders, Hon. Romulus M., 33. St. Paul's Church, 154. Secession, Right of, 150. Seward, W. H., his little bell, 122, 190. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 307. Sheridan, General P. H., Vanda