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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
an riding in a gallop behind his line; through the roar in his front and the rising yell in his rear, he could hear Logan's voice in fierce entreaty to his boys. near the 31st stood W. H. L. Wallace's regiment, the 11th Illinois, under Lieutenant-Colonel Ransom. The gaps in the ranks of the two were closed up always toward the colors. The ground at their feet was strewn with their dead and wounded; at length the common misfortune overtook Logan. To keep men without cartridges under fire sweeping them front and flank would be cruel, if not impossible; and seeing it, he too gave the order to retire, and followed his decimated companies to the rear. The 11th then became the right of the brigade, and had to go in turn. Nevertheless, Ransom changed front to rear coolly, as if on parade, and joined in the General retirement. Forrest charged them and threw them into a brief confusion. The greater portion clung to their colors, and made good their retreat. By 11 o'clock Pillow held t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
s S. Dennis; 31st Ill., Col. John A. Logan (w); Battery A, Ill. Lt. Arty., Capt. Jasper M. Dresser; Battery E, 2d 11. Lt. Artillery, Lieut. G. C. Gumbart; A and B, 2d Ill. Cavalry, Capts. John R. Hotaling and Thomas J. Larrison; C, 2d, and I, 4th U. S. Cavalry, Lieut. James Powell; Ind'p't companies Ill. Cavalry, Capts. E. Carmichael, James J. Dollins, M. J. O'Harnett, and Lieut. Ezra King. Brigade loss: k, 184; w, 603; n, 66-853. Second Brigade, Col. W. H. L. Wallace: 11th Ill., Lieut.-Col. T. E. G. Ransom (w), Major Garrett Nevins (temporarily); 20th Ill., Col. C. Carroll Marsh; 45th Ill., Col. John E. Smith; 48th Ill., Col. Isham N. Haynie (temporarily commanding Third Brigade), Lieut.-Col. Thomas H. Smith (k); Battery B, 1st Ill. Lt. Artillery, Capt. Ezra Taylor; Battery D, 1st 111. Lt. Artillery, Capt. Edward McAllister; 4th Ill. Cavalry, Col. T. Lyle Dickey. Brigade loss: k, 99; w, 350; in, 98 = 547. Third Brigade, Col. Wm. R. Morrison (w), Col. Leonard F. Ross: 17th Ill., Maj
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
. First Brigade, Col. A. M. Hare (w), Col. M. M. Crocker: 8th Ill., Capt. James M. Ashmore (w), Capt. William H. Harvey (k), Capt. R. H. Sturgess; 18th Ill., Major Samuel Eaton (w), Capt. Daniel H. Brush (w), Capt. William J. Dillon (k), Capt. J. J. Anderson; 11th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William Hall; 13th Iowa, Col. Marcellus M. Crocker; Battery D, 2d Ill. Artillery, Capt. James P. Timony. Brigade loss: k, 104; w, 467 ; m, 9 = 580. Second Brigade, Col. C. Carroll Marsh: 11th Ill., Lieut.-Col. T. E. G. Ransom (w), Major Garrett Nevins (w), Capt. Lloyd D. Waddell, Major Garrett Nevins; 20th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Evan Richards (w), Capt. Orton Frisbie; 45th Ill., Col. John E. Smith; 48th Ill., Col. Isham N. Haynie (w), Maj. Manning Mayfield. Brigade loss: k, 80; w, 475; m, 30= 585. Third Brigade, Col. Julius Raith (m w), Lieut.-Col. Enos P. Wood, Col. C. Carroll Marsh: 17th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Enos P. Wood, Maj. Francis M. Smith; 29th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Charles M. Ferrell; 43d Ill., Lieut.-Col
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
at Ezra Church, here appeared again, commanding Cheatham's corps. At 3 P. M. on the 31st the Confederates came on with the usual vigor, but were met by Logan and Ransom, and thoroughly repulsed. Hood now abandoned Atlanta, and united with Hardee in the vicinity of Jonesboro‘, near Love-joy's Station. Thomas, joining my left flahotograph. on leave of absence; the field-force of the Army of the Tennessee was consolidated into two corps, Osterhaus temporarily commanding the Fifteenth, and Ransom the Seventeenth. Thomas went to Chattanooga to defend the communications with Sherman's army. Wagner's division was sent to Chattanooga, and Corse's division tot and left, and camped close up to Hood's rear-guard. He again refused battle, and we pursued him beyond Gaylesville, Alabama. Between Rome and Gaylesville, General Ransom, thee gallant and promising young officer before mentioned, died from over-work and exposure due to our Brevet Major-General T. E. G. Ransom. From a photog
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
rigades of the Nineteenth Corps, about 10,500 strong, Cameron's and Ransom's divisions of the Thirteenth Corps, about 4800, and the newly orgal, Lee's cavalry in advance, followed by the Thirteenth Corps under Ransom, Emory's division of the Nineteenth, and Dickey's colored brigade. bivouacked on Bayou St. Patrice, seven miles beyond Pleasant Hill, Ransom and Emory at Pleasant Hill, thirty-three miles from Natchitoches, a body of the army marched at daybreak and halted between 10 and 11, Ransom two miles beyond Bayou St. Patrice and Emory on its banks, to wait J. Smith moved up to within two miles of Pleasant Hill. Banks sent Ransom forward with Emerson's brigade, and rode to the front himself at an. Smith had been left, and where what remained of Lee's cavalry, of Ransom's corps, now under Cameron, Ransom having been wounded at SabineRansom having been wounded at Sabine Crossroads. and of Dickey's colored brigade had been re-formed during the night. The train, escorted by Dickey's brigade, was put in motion
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
rn portion of the town, on Crawford Street, near the residence of Mr. Willis. Battery Clark, in the eastern part of the city, between Grove and Jackson Streets. Battery Boomer, one half mile east of the city, on the Jackson road. Battery Sherman, one hundred yards in advance of Battery Wilson, between Jackson road and Win bayou. Battery Crocker, three-fourths of a mile north of Win bayou. Battery Ransom, one-fourth of a mile north of Fort Crocker. Battery Smith, one-fourth of a mile west of Ransom. Battery Hickenlooper, one mile north of the city, on the Valley road. I am indebted to Captain William J. White, aid-de-camp of General T. J. Hood. for the information contained in this note. See note 1, page 616, volume II, and sent out expeditions to other places. We have observed, that, on the fall of Vicksburg, Grant was about to send General Herron to the aid of Banks, then besieging Port Hudson, See page 631, volume II. when he heard of the surrender of that post. Herron ha
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
Brownsville, thirty miles up the river, which Banks's advance entered on the 6th. November. Point Isabel was taken possession of on the 8th; and as soon as possible Banks, who made his Headquarters at Brownsville, sent as many troops as he could spare, up the coast, to seize and occupy the water passes between the Rio Grande and Galveston. By the aid of steamers obtained on the Rio Grande, troops were transported to Mustang Island, off Corpus Christi Bay, from which a force, under General T. E. G. Ransom, went to the Aranzas Pass, farther up the coast, and by a gallant assault Nov. 18, 1863. carried the Confederate works there, and captured one hundred prisoners. Corpus Christi was occupied by National troops the same day. Then a force, under General Washburne (then commanding the Thirteenth Army Corps), moved upon Pass Cavallo, at the entrance to Matagorda Bay, where the Confederates had a strong fort, called Esperanza, garrisoned by two thousand men of all arms. It was invested
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
, followed by two thin divisions of the Thirteenth Corps, under General Ransom. General Emory followed Ransom with the First Division This Ransom with the First Division This was a division of picked men, composed of the Third Iowa, Forty-first, Eighty-first, and Ninety-fifth Illinois, Fourteenth and Thirty-third Wionfederates would not. allow him to wait, and so, at noon, when General Ransom came up with the. Second Brigade of the Thirteenth, to relieve that it was difficult for men and artillery to retreat. There General Ransom lost ten guns and about a thousand men captured, and Lee lost nr. --Correspondent of the Philadelphia Press. Generals Franklin and Ransom, and Colonel Robinson of the Third Cavalry, were wounded, and Colonlonel Webb, of the Seventy-seventh Ohio, and Captain Dickey, of General Ransom's staff, were killed. So ended, in disaster to the Union arms, most of Lee's cavalry division, the brigade of colored troops, and Ransom's shattered columns, were sent some distance on the road toward Gra
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
nd of troops in the upper part of the Valley, was directed by Lee to gather to his own all the troops in that region, and move rapidly to and across the Potomac into Maryland, with the threefold object, it appears, of drawing National troops from before Petersburg, procuring supplies, and attempting the capture of Washington City. Early quickly obeyed. With from 15,000 to 20,000 troops of all arms, Composed of two infantry corps, under Breckinridge and Rodes, a division of cavalry under Ransom, and three batteries of artillery. he swept rapidly down the Valley toward Williamsport. Sigel, too weak to resist the avalanche, fled July 3, 1864. into Maryland, with a heavy loss of stores, and General Weber, in command at Harper's Ferry, retired to Maryland Heights. Grant, meanwhile, had directed Hunter, who was then on the Kanawha, to hasten to Harper's Ferry with all possible dispatch; but insuperable obstacles kept him back until it was too late to be of essential service, and Earl
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
tle against the formidable ram in such close quarters. It first struck. and sunk the Southfield, and then turning upon the Miami, drove her down the river, after killing her commander and disabling many of her crew. Then the Albemarle turned her 32-pounder rifled guns upon the town, and shelled it with serious effect. On the following day April 20. Hoke pushed his batteries to within an average distance of eleven hundred yards of the town, and with these he made a general assault. General Ransom led a brigade to the attack on the right, and Hoke conducted, in person, two brigades in the assault on the left. The defense was obstinate. The assault was equally so. The Confederates, with the greatest bravery, pressed up in the face of a murderous fire, and, by desperate work, carried the two outer redoubts, which mounted eight guns, and made prisoners of their garrisons. Then the victors dashed forward to the town, and soon carried it. Meanwhile, Fort Williams was making terribl
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