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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 13: Vicksburg campaign (search)
good-fortune to carry Grant's orders to McClernand and McPherson, who were operating in different quarters, to supervise the destruction of the Confederate bridges and the construction of our own, and Dana was my inseparable companion. We were riding or working night and day, and although the distances to be covered were generally from thirty to forty miles per day, we enjoyed every minute of the time. On the day the battle of Raymond was fought we covered the distance between Auburn and Raymond twice each way, and did not get back to headquarters till nearly midnight. At Jackson we passed one night in comfortable beds and had a fair supply of Southern food. On asking for our bill the next day, to include General Grant and the entire staff, the manager answered that it would be sixty-five dollars, whereupon I handed him a brand new Confederate treasury note for one hundred dollars. At this, after some hesitation, he said, Oh, if I take that I shall be compelled to charge you ni
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 25: epoch of public corruption (search)
Sun's part in it received an amount of non-partisan and even of Republican approval that has rarely ever been accorded to independent journalism. Ignoring with his accustomed indifference the efforts of the Republican press to put him personally on the defensive after the campaign was ended, Dana said in the Sun of December 6, 1872: A great deal of twaddle is uttered by some country newspapers just now over what they call personal journalism. They say that now that Mr. Bennett, Mr. Raymond, and Mr. Greeley are dead, the day for personal journalism is gone by, and that impersonal journalism will take its place. That appears to mean a sort of journalism in which nobody will ask who is the editor of a paper or the writer of any class of article, and nobody will care. Whenever, in the newspaper profession, a man rises up who is original, strong, and bold enough to make his opinions a matter of consequence to the public, there will be personal journalism; and whenever newspa
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
7, 86. Rawlins, General, preface, 5, 192, 197, 201, 207, 211, 220, 232, 240-2142, 250-252, 266, 278, 281, 285, 297, 298, 302, 303, 312, 325, 326, 327, 341, 341, 349-351, 353, 365, 369, 374-377, 387, 388, 399, 406, 407, 411, 415, 416, 418. Raymond, battle of, 221, 222. Raymond, Henry J., 129, 430. Recollections of the Civil War, 214, 239, 243. Reconstruction, 370-372, 383, 390, 391, 398. Red River, 209. Reduction of army, 446. Reeder, Governor, 136. Reformation, the, 84. Raymond, Henry J., 129, 430. Recollections of the Civil War, 214, 239, 243. Reconstruction, 370-372, 383, 390, 391, 398. Red River, 209. Reduction of army, 446. Reeder, Governor, 136. Reformation, the, 84. Reform, industrial, social, land, and financial, 108, 112. Religion, 16, 17,27,28,34,451,452. Republican party, foundation of, 126, 138, 152. Resaca, railroad station at, 294. Review, great, 341, 361, 362. Revolution, French, of 1848, 62, et seq. Reynolds, General, J. J., 269, 348. Richmond, 166, 256, 310, 318, 320, 326, 327, 329, 330, 332, 333, 353, 356, 357, 359, 363. Ringgold Station, 257. Ripley, George, 17, 26, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35-37, 39, 44, 45, 48, 49, 51, 153, 1
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 1: his early years and first employment as a compositor (search)
t of his slender means, as afterward in New York, he always found some surplus to send to the struggling family in the Pennsylvania wilderness. It is interesting here to note that from the town of Poultney, Vt., came George Jones, who gave Henry J. Raymond his chief financial assistance in founding the New York Times, and long survived both Greeley and Raymond as controlling owner of the Times. Horace's experience in East Poultney was of the greatest educational value to him. There he firstRaymond as controlling owner of the Times. Horace's experience in East Poultney was of the greatest educational value to him. There he first had access to a public library. He soon joined a debating club, of which the leading citizens of the town were members, and, without changing his working clothes or attempting oratory, he won a reputation as a cogent reasoner, and a speaker who was always sure of his facts. As there were only two or three workmen employed in the office, he had experience, not only in setting type, but in blistering his hands and laming his back assisting in running off the edition on an old-fashioned hand-pr
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 2: first experiences in New York city-the New Yorker (search)
making a good paper of his initial venture was a sufficient proof of his editorial ability. What the New Yorker was he made it almost unaided. In his farewell address to his subscribers, in 1841, when the paper was merged with the Weekly Tribune, he said: The editorial charge of the New Yorker has from the first devolved on him who now addresses its readers. At times he has been aided in the literary department by gentlemen of decided talent and eminence [including Park Benjamin, Henry J. Raymond, in a letter to R. W. Griswold, from Burlington, Vt., October 31, 1839, said: I am sorry Benjamin has left the New Yorker. If he had exerted himself but a little he could have made that infinitely the best weekly in the United States. Who will Greeley associate with him? I hope (but do not expect) that he will get one to fill B.'s place. The Sentinel here a few weeks since undertook to use up Benjamin instanter on account of his critique of Irving. I gave it a decent rap for it in
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 4: the founding of the New York Tribune (search)
red as an editorial assistant on the New Yorker a young man who, while a college student in Vermont, had been a valued contributor to that journal. This was Henry J. Raymond, in later years the founder of the Tribune's chief local competitor, the Times, and an antagonist in views social and political. Greeley has said that RaymoRaymond showed more versatility and ability in journalism than any man of his age whom he ever met, and that he was the only one of his assistants with whom he had to remonstrate for doing more work than any human brain and frame could be expected long to endure. Young editors who grow discouraged under criticisms of their first workencouragement in contrasting this praise of Raymond's practised labor with the following description by Greeley of his first attempts (given in a private letter): Raymond is a good fellow, but utterly destitute of experience. . . . He went to work as a novice would, shears in hand, and cut out the most infernal lot of newspaper tra
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
his death, took no unimportant part in the making of the paper. In his first chief assistant, Raymond, he secured one of the ablest journalists of the day — a man who recognized the value of news, ation, or a combination of effort, instead of the present system of isolated households. Henry J. Raymond wrote to R. W. Griswold in 1841: Greeley got himself into a scrape by connecting himself wito a discussion of Fourierism, and its articles were written by Greeley's former assistant, Henry J. Raymond, who had joined its staff in 1843. Raymond denied that the condition of the laboring classRaymond denied that the condition of the laboring classes was as bad as the Fourierites pictured it, and called the new doctrines hostile to Christianity, to morality, and to conjugal constancy. After the close of this debate the Tribune practically dros naked for an attack on any worthy foe was an intellectual hero in thousands of eyes, and when Raymond started the Times in 1852 to supply a journal of political views similar to those advocated by
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 8: during the civil war (search)
e convention resulted in the nomination of his rival, Henry J. Raymond, for Lieutenant-Governor, he was so exasperated that en created on purpose to give its valuable patronage to H. J. Raymond and enable St. John to show forth his Times as the orgaiana that he could not carry those States. Thereupon Henry J. Raymond wrote from Seward's home a letter to the New York Tim, and indignantly rejected by the American people. Henry J. Raymond, in his journal, Scribner's Monthly, March, 1880. igham about mediation, and that later Greeley said to him (Raymond), on the Albany boat, that he meant to carry out the policw York one of the trustees of the Tribune Association told Raymond that the trustees would not permit Greeley to continue thwhen the Confederate assent thereto had been obtained. Raymond also recalls an after-dinner conversation in Washington, oncoln had just been renominated (Greeley's old rival, Henry J. Raymond had reported it), and suggesting, as terms of settlem
on the country press, 58; plan of the Tribune, 58, 60; Harrison's death, 60, birth and early struggles of the Tribune, 61; partnership with McElrath, 62; on Henry J. Raymond, 64; labor on the Tribune, 65, 69; views of the stage, 65; use of epithets, 67, 154 note; report of Cooper libel suit, 68; newspaper versatility, 71; associausal to be guided by Weed, 78; early sympathy with socialism, 79; support of Brisbane's Fourierism, 79-84; director of North American Phalanx, 81; discussion with Raymond, 84; later views on socialism, 84-86; acceptance of Graham's dietetic doctrine, 86; residence on the East River, 88; Margaret Fuller's views, 88, 89; opinion of ser to Kane, 121. Porter, W. T., 24. Prayer of Twenty Millions, 196-198. Prohibition, Greeley's advocacy of, 172. Q. Quincy, Edmund, 72. R. Raymond, Henry J., concerning the New Yorker, 29; Greeley's assistant, 64; discussion 9n Fourierism, 84; founds New York Times, 94; Lieutenant-Governor, 173; letter on Gree
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
during its early career it sinned by ignoring and discouraging American authors, it seemed at a later date almost to sin in the opposite direction. At times it has published so many contributions from a young author of growing popularity as to raise the question whether it was not encouraging hasty and ill-considered writing. Among writers of tales whom it exploited in this way were Richard Harding Davis, Mary E. Wilkins, and Stephen Crane. The first editor of Harper's monthly was Henry J. Raymond. Henry M. Alden, his successor, was editor for fifty years (1869-1919). Fletcher Harper, a member of the firm, habitually contracted for the serials and for much other fiction, and had a great share in determining the contents of the magazine. Of the special departments which are distinctive of Harper's magazine the most important is The Editor's Easy Chair. George William Curtis assumed control of this in 1853, and his essays which appeared under this head are among the most delightf
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