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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
er told that Jackson thought his leading division would approach at two o'clock that afternoon. During the day heavy cannonading was heard towards the east and northeast, and rumors reached McLaws of the advance of the enemy from Frederick, but the signal-parties and cavalry failed to discover movements, so the firing was not credited as of significance. The morning of the 14th was occupied in cutting a road for his artillery up to the point overlooking Harper's Ferry, and at two P. M. Captains Read and Carlton had their best guns in position over the town. But during these progressions the Confederates on other fields had been called to more serious work. General McClellan, moving his columns out from the vicinity of Washington City on the 5th, made slow and very cautious marches to save fatigue of his men and at the same time cover the capital against unforeseen contingency; so slow and cautious was the march that he only covered forty or fifty miles in seven days. On the 12t
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
homas Sloan and Capt. S. W. Marshborne; 15th Va., Capts. E. M. Morrison and E. J. Willis; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague. Barksdale's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Barksdale; 13th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Kennon McElroy; 17th Miss., Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Maj. J. C. Campbell and Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Capt. John Sims and Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Artillery, Maj. S. P. Hamilton, Col. H. C. Cabell; Manly's (N. C.) battery, Capt. B. C. Manly; Pulaski (Ga.) Art., Capt. J. P. W. Read; Richmond (Fayette) Art., Capt. M. C. Macon; Richmond Howitzers (1st Co.), Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Troup (Ga.) Art., Capt. H. H. Carlton. Anderson's Division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson:--Wilcox's Brigade, Col. Alfred Cumming; 8th, 9th, 10th, and 11th Ala. Mahone's Brigade, Col. William A. Parham; 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Va. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Featherston, Col. Carnot Posey; 12th Miss., 16th Miss., Capt. A. M. Feltus; 19th Miss., 2d Miss. Battn.
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
am Barksdale; 13th Miss., Col. J. W. Carter; 17th Miss., Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Lieut.-Col. W. H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Cobb's Brigade, (1) Brig.-Gen. T. R. R. Cobb, (2) Col. Robert McMillan; 16th Ga., Col. Goode Bryan; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb Legion; Phillips's Legion, Col. B. F. Cook. Semmes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes; 10th, 50th, 51st, and 53d Ga. Artillery, Col. H. C. Cabell; Manly's (N. C.) battery, Read's (Ga.) battery, Richmond Howitzers (1st), McCarthy's battery; Troup (Ga.) Art. (Carlton's battery). Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson:--Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox; 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 14th Ala. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone; 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Va. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston; 12th, 16th, 19th, and 48th Miss. (5 cos.). Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 3d (Col. Edward J. Walker), 22d, 48t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
ew. About 2 A. M., of the 11th, General Barksdale notified me that the movements on the other side indicated that the enemy were preparing to lay down the pontoon-bridges. I told him to let the bridge building go on until the enemy were committed to it and the construction parties were within easy range. At 4:30 he reported that the bridge was being rapidly constructed and was nearly half done, and he was about to open fire. I then ordered the signal to be given by firing two guns of J. P. W. Read's battery, posted on the highest point along my front, on the edge of the hills alongside the main road running to the city. Previous notice had been sent to General Lee and to corps headquarters that the bridge was being constructed. With the sound of the cannon was mingled the rattle of the rifles of the Mississippi men, who opened a concentrated fire from the rifle-pits and swept the bridge, now crowded with the construction parties. Nine distinct and desperate attempts were made
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.18 (search)
e's crack and the bullet's whistle,--forgot even the dead hand that had stretched itself toward me all the morning with its clutch of grass. I was called back to the dull wet earth and the crouching line at Fredericksburg by a request from Sergeant Read, who guessed he could hit that cuss with a spy-glass,--pointing, as he spoke, to the batteries that threatened our right flank. Then I saw that there was commotion at that part of the Confederate works, and an officer on the parapet, with a overed us at last, after letting us lie here till high noon, and were we now to receive the plunging fire we had looked for all the morning? Desirable in itself as it might be to have that cuss with a spy-glass removed, it seemed wiser to repress Read's ambition. The shooting of an officer would dispel any doubts they might have of our presence, and we needed the benefit of all their doubts. Happily, they seemed to think us not worth their powder and iron. Were we really destined to see th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
a., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb (Ga.) Legion,----; The dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--editors. Phillips (Ga.) Legion, Col. B. F. Cook. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 198; m, 4 == 235. Semmes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga.,----; 50th Ga.,----; 51st Ga.,----; 53d Ga.,----. Brigade loss: w, 4. Artillery, Col. Henry C. Cabell: N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly; Ga. Battery, Capt. J. P. W. Read; 1st Richmond (Va.) Howitzers, Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Ga. Battery (Troup Art'y), Capt. Henry H. Carlton. Artillery loss: w, 2. (Colonel Cabell also commanded Nelson's battalion, and Branch's, Cooper's Dearing's, Ells's, Eubank's, Lane's, Macon's, and Ross's batteries.) Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 8th Ala.,----; 9th Ala.,----; 10th Ala.,----; llth Ala.,----;14th Ala.,----. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 15 == 18. Mah
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.76 (search)
they exhibited in their new service the cool courage natural to them on land. They were worthily commanded, under the orders of our first lieutenant, by Captain Harris. Our officers were Lieutenants Stevens, Grimball, Gift, Barbot, Wharton, and Read, all of the old service, and Chief Engineer City, Acting Masters Milliken and Nicholls, of the Volunteer Navy, and Building the Arkansas. Midshipmen Scales, Dabney M. Scales was from the Naval Academy at Annapolis; he distinguished himseis blow was tempered to us no doubt by the effect of our three broadside guns, which were fired into him when he was less than fifty feet distant. Apparently blinded by such a blow in the face, he drifted astern and ran ashore under the muzzles of Read's rifles, the bolts from which were probably lost in the immense quantity of hay in bales which seemed stowed over and around him. Getting clear of the bank, the ram wore round without again attempting to strike the Arkansas, and steamed at great
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
Whiting's division, Maj.-Gen. W. H. C. Whiting. Wise's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 34th Va.,----; 46th Va.,----; 59th Va., Col. William B. Tabb. Martin's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James G. Martin: 17th N. C.,----; 42d N. C.,----; 66th N. C.,----. Cavalry, Brig.-Gen. James Dearing: 7th Confederate, Col. V. H. Taliaferro; 8th Ga., Col. Joel R. Griffin; 4th N. C., Col. Dennis D. Ferrebee; 65th N. C., Col. G. N. Folk. Thirty-eighth Battalion Va. Artillery, Maj. J. P. W. Read: Blount's, Caskie's, Macon's, and Marshall's batteries. miscellaneous: Elliott's Brigade, Col. Stephen Elliott, Jr.: 61st N. C.,----; Holcombe (S. C.) Legion,----. Hunton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Eppa Hunton: 8th Va., Capt. H. C. Bowie; 19th Va., Capt. J. G. Woodson; 25th Va. (Battalion), Lieut.-Col. W. M. Elliott; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague; 56th Va., Capt. John Richardson; 42d Va. Cav. Batt'n, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Robins. Maryland Line, Col. Bradley T. Johnson : 2d Md. Inf., Capt. J.