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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official Reports of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ges strewn with their wounded and dead comrades, many of whom could not be removed and were left upon the field. The First Texas, under Lieutenant-Colonel Work, with a portion of Benning's brigade, held the field and the batteries taken by the First Texas. Three of the guns were brought off the field and secured; the other three, from the nature of the ground and their proximity to the enemy, were left. The Third Arkansas, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor, ably assisted by Major Ready, after Colonel Manning was borne from the field, sustained well the high character she made in the earlier part of the action. When night closed the conflict, late in the evening, I was struck above the knee, which deprived me of the use of my leg, and prevented me from getting about the field. I retired some two hundred yards to the rear, leaving the immediate command with Lieutenant-Colonel Work, the senior officer present, under whose supervision our wounded were brought out and guns
events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The Twelfth Virginia and the Third Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiments were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the Third Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjt. Johnson, Capt. Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown were killed, and Capt. Ready, Capt. Robinson, Lieut. Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut. Patridge were wounded. The casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburgh artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Capt. Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded. He also had between thirty and forty
ndman on the left. Everett's battery took position between my left and the right of Law's. Shortly after nine A. M., the skirmishers, under direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Ready, fell back to the breastworks, bringing those of the enemy after them. A well-directed fire from the Forty-fourth Tennessee drove the enemy's skirmisherenemy. The whole line crossing the fence, the engagement became general. Here we passed a house and garden, and through an open field (it was here that Lieutenant-Colonel Ready, of the Twenty-third Tennessee, was wounded, while rushing forward). On entering the house, cribs, &c., many prisoners, both officers and men, were captuwounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Snowden, commanding the Twenty-fifth Tennessee regiment. Colonel Keeble, commanding Twenty-third Tennessee regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel Ready, of Twenty-third Tennessee regiment, wounded. Major Lowe,-------Tennessee regiment, wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Floyd, commanding Seventeenth Tenne
g her bread and butter with a matter-of-fact certainty and marvelous satisfaction, mother goes doubting and reckoning round, like Mrs. Diffidence in Doubting Castle, till you see rising up another little table in another corner of the room, with a good substantial structure of broiled ham and coffee, and a boiled egg or two, with various et ceteras, which Mrs. Diffidence, after many desponding ejaculations, finally sits down to, and in spite of all presentiments makes them fly as nimbly as Mr. Ready-to-Halt did Miss Much-afraid when he footed it so well with her on his crutches in the dance on the occasion of Giant Despair's overthrow. I have thus far dined alternately with mother and Aunt Susan, not having yet been admitted to Aunt Nabby's establishment. There are now great talkings, and congresses and consultations of the allied powers, and already rumors are afloat that perhaps all will unite their forces and dine at one table, especially as Harriet and little Hattie are coming
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official reports of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
(one of my advanced scouts in that direction having reported to me that a column of the enemy was moving down a ravine or hollow, and threatening me in that quarter.) Having made every disposition to guard my right and rear, I placed Captain D. K. Rice in charge of such defence, and proceeded to the Third Arkansas regiment, of which General Robertson had ordered me to take charge. After the loss of some half hour in searching for the Third Arkansas, I found Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor and Major Ready, of that regiment, both alive and uninjured and in charge of the regiment, which was doing its duty nobly and well. Late in the evening a terrific fire of artillery was concentrated against the hill occupied by this (the First regiment), and many were killed and wounded, some losing their heads and others so horribly mutilated and mangled that their identity could scarcely be established, but, notwithstanding this, all the men continued heroically and unflinchingly to maintain their posi
Col. Haskins, from the Commissioners of Streets, reported in favor of giving William Ready the contract for indexing and numbering the streets, in accordance with the plan of the City Engineer. Mr. Scott opposed the report, first, because he did not know that the Council had the right to compel citizens to put numbers on their houses — and, second, because a citizen of Richmond, who desired to propose for the work, had been denied the privilege of doing so. Mr. Denton thought Mr. Ready was entitled to the contract, and that the Council should give it to him, if it had the right to require citizens to number their houses. After further discussion, on motion of Mr. Hill, the report was laid on the table. On motion of Col. Haskins, permission was granted to C. B. Lipscomb to erect a temporary staging over Dock street, for unloading coal vessels. On motion of Col. Haskins, the sum of $325 was appropriated for reducing and putting Leigh street in order, between
he events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiment were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the 3d Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjutant Johnston, Capt Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown, were killed, and Captain Ready, Capt Robinson, Lieut Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut Partridge were wounded. These casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburg Artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Captain Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded. He also had between thirty and fo
W S A Fox, James Gunnsis, Samuel Harvey, S B Hall, Mike Peacock, James Burre, M W Williams. Missing: B F Bock, W R Brown. Company G., Lomax Sharpshooters--Killed: Thomas Kelley, J Shipman, Andrew Hall, Robt Walker, P Sprott. Wounded: J T Haggerty, severely; B Bledace, do; agt P A Townshend, do; J J Harrison, slightly; Geo Gibson, mortally; Lt John Ledyard, slightly. Missing: J B Garrett, J B Bowden. Company I., Wetumka Light Infantry.--Killed: C C Tommy, E P Miller. Wounded: Capt Ready, Robert Bolling, L J Bryan, Chas Fagan, Moses Hyman, Geo Pascal, Ben Trice, John Bross, W E Bunt. Missing: Jas Fears, J L Dixon. Company H.--(Lowndes Beauregard)--Wounded: Capt Robinson, slightly; A J Cocreban, do.; C Douglas, H B Whitman, W E Williams — all slight. Company K--(Mobile Rifles.)--Killed: Coco Colburn, privates Baily, Campbell, Crowder, Garron, Jackson, McNulty, McDonald, Robinson, Roper, Swain, Secrell, Williams. wounded: Lieut Gardner, in leg; agt Duffle, severe