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The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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of June. Sent on. Ansuron Jackson, free negro, stealing $300 from James Stanley. Acquitted. Peter Burress and Jas McDonald, stealing $800 and a gold watch from Wm Riley. Discharge. Wm H Rose, free negro, stealing $1,500 from Samuel T Reamy. Found guilty and ordered to be sold into slavery. Gus, slave to Mrs. Susan Hill, charged with aiding and abetting Wm H Rose in the robbery of Samuel T Reamy. Acquitted. Franklin Roberts, garroting, Joseph Johnson of $150. Sent on for fley. Discharge. Wm H Rose, free negro, stealing $1,500 from Samuel T Reamy. Found guilty and ordered to be sold into slavery. Gus, slave to Mrs. Susan Hill, charged with aiding and abetting Wm H Rose in the robbery of Samuel T Reamy. Acquitted. Franklin Roberts, garroting, Joseph Johnson of $150. Sent on for final trial at the next term of Judge Lyons's Court. The Court having ordered a jury for to-day all witnesses in misdemeanor cases should be prompt in their attendance.
oner lead of cotton, and to be busily engaged in building traverses with them on the only corner of the parapet which seemed to be uninjured. Just after sunset on Saturday evening it became evident that they had mounted a gun there, two shots having been fired from it apparently to obtain the channel range. There being still some show of life in Sumter, it was determined by Gen. Gillmore to again open his siege guns upon it, and Sunday morning the Naval battery, now under command of Lieut. Reamy, and the 300 pound Parrott, recommence the bombardment. They continued all day on Sunday, and resumed the work again this morning, having caused the disappearance of both the traverses and the gun, and still further disfigured the mass of ruins. The appearance of Sumter to-day is that of a vast ruin. The rear wall is a crumbling mass of debris. The wall facing the sea, which presented such a beautiful and majestic appearance, with not less than forty clearly defined port-holes, ha