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hich amounted to $552. The detectives were put on the look out for him, but could hear nothing of him, except that he had been last seen to go into a boarding house on the corner of 8th and Marshall streets. Last Saturday morning detective John Reece being in Tappahannock, Essex co., on other business, recognized the absconding debtor of the Ballard House in the person of one of three men who were just in the act of crossing the Rappahannock river, on their way North. Reece stopped the parReece stopped the party and spoke to Lugo as Doctor, and asked him for his passport. Lugo produced the passport of Mr. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, but Recce telling him that that would not answer, took him into custody. Lugo professed astonishment and indignation, and put on a great many grand airs, but all to no purpose. Recce took him to a room in the hotel in the place and searched him, and found on his person charts of Charleston harbor, Wilmington and Richmond and their defences, and maps of all of our
A Bosque Detection. --Officer John Reece, of Capt. McCubbin's staff of detectives, yesterday morning arrested Lieut. George Brown, of Maryland, on the charge of committing various acts under cover of the false representation that he was a detective officer of the Confederate Government. Upon the person of Brown Reece found, among other papers, a forged order, purporting to be signed by Gen. Winder, giving authority to certain parties to search houses for stolen property. After a cursory examination at the Provost Marshal's office, Brown was committed to Castle Thunder.
Important case. --The Hustings Court of Magistrates yesterday, before their adjournment, committed John Reece, a detective in the Chief of Police office, to jail, in default of thirty-seven thousand dollars security for his appearance to testify in certain cases for gambling and selling liquor in the city contrary to a State law prohibiting said practices. At a later hour, Reece sued out a release from prison under writ of habeas corpus before Judge Joynes, of Petersburg, now in this city; but that functionary, after a due consideration of the matter, refused to give any decision till this morning. [It will be recollected by our readers that, at thenctionary, after a due consideration of the matter, refused to give any decision till this morning. [It will be recollected by our readers that, at the July term of Judge Lyons's Court, Reece testified before the Grand Jury in seventy-odd cases against different parties for gambling at faro and violating the liquor license law.]
A Detective "Peppered" and --Yesterday morning detectives John Reece and James K. Hix received information that there were three Confederate deserters skulking about in the vicinity of Clarke'sorthwith repaired thither in search of them. On arriving in the neighborhood the two separated, Reece taking one direction and Hix the other Reece had not proceeded far before he discovered the dese very severely and making a large gash in his cheeks. The party then fled, and were fired at by Reece, though neither were struck. Heating the report of a pistol, Hix went to the assistance of ReecReece, and was much astonished to find him bleeding profusely from his face and hands, as well as perfectly blind in consequence of the pepper which had been thrown in his eyes. Reece's sufferings are rReece's sufferings are represented as being of the most excruciating character, and he had to be led back to his residence, near Brooke Avenue, where, up to a late hour yesterday afternoon, he was still experiencing great p
t, slave of Thomas Finley, charged with committing the their; and Henry Williams, a free negro, charged with receiving a trunk containing Mr. Werner's wearing apparel, knowing it to have been stolen. The following testimony, given by detective John Reece, covers the whole facts elicited about the affair: Detective Reece stated that, on Sunday morning, myself and detectives Charles and Fitchett were informed by Mr. Werner, the keeper of a barber shop opposite the American Hotel, that his roReece stated that, on Sunday morning, myself and detectives Charles and Fitchett were informed by Mr. Werner, the keeper of a barber shop opposite the American Hotel, that his room, over W. C. Hebener's store, on Main street, opposite the Exchange Bank, had been broken open during his absence on Saturday night, between 5 and 8 o'clock, and robbed of a trunk containing a valuable collection of gold and silver watches, jewelry, wearing apparel, &c. We set to work to ferret out the matter. We first called to see the negro boy Robert, who is employed in Werner's shop, and, by close questioning, learnt from him that he had a short while before been in company with Bill Car
ce in the case showed that two Yankee deserters had been provided sixty-odd dollars each, and, accompanied by Detective John Reece and a guard attired in Confederate uniform, were then sent out in order to convict, or remove a suspicions from, certaisuspected of dealing in greenbacks. The modus operandi by which they were bagged was somewhat as follows: Detective Reece remained outside, while the two deserters and the guard entered together, the latter of whom proposed the trade. In the Federal money which the deserters had at the rate of fifteen dollars for one. Immediately after settling the matter, Reece walked up to McCormack, having previously been signalized, and demanded of him the money he had bought from the desertersaccused promptly acknowledged the transaction, and surrendered the Federal funds, as well as his own person, to Detective Reece. The examination before the Commissioner being incomplete, further proceedings were postponed till this morning at 10 o'