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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 5 1 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 3 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Reille or search for Reille in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
and impartial critic must admit the offensive dispositions of Lee skillful; the Union left on the 2d to a late hour was most vulnerable, and upon it the attack was designed; while the assault on the 3d, if not surrounded with as many chances of success as on the former day, was made at a point where, if successful, he would have secured the great roads to Baltimore and Washington. It was not unlike Napoleon's tactics at Waterloo; the artillery fire was opened there on the allied right, and Reille directed to carry Hougoumont, but the real plan of the great soldier was to break through Wellington's left center, which he ordered to be assaulted with D'Erlon's whole corps supported by Loban's, to drive back the allies on their own right, and secure the great road to Brussels before the helmets of the Prussian squadrons could be seen on the heights of St. Lambert. Lee, too, was infused with the confidence of the fighting power of an army trembling with eagerness to rush upon the enemy,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 17: military character. (search)
was a similarity of purpose on the part of Lee on the third day's encounter at Gettysburg and the French emperor at Waterloo. The sun rises in Belgium in June at 3.48 A. M., in Pennsylvania in July at 4.30 A. M. Napoleon, at 11.30 A. M., ordered Reille, on his left, to attack Hougoumont on the English right with his left division as a diversion, while his main intention was to attack the British center and left center by his first corps, under D'Erlon, and brought up seventy-eight cannon to firdered forward until halfpast one. Ewell, on Lee's left, was ordered to make a demonstration on the Federal right; cannon fired for hours, and then Pickett's assaulting column attempted to pierce the center and left center of the Union lines. Count Reille managed to get nearly the whole of his corps engaged, but effected nothing. Ewell got his troops early in action, but with no results. The fighting of both had terminated before the main operations began. Napoleon's object was to seize Mont