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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 28 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
ce Crosby; Sciota, Lieutenant Edward Donaldson; Winona, Lieutenant Edward T. Nichols; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith. Sailing sloop (stationed with mortar division): Portsmouth, Commander Samuel Swartwout. mortar division: Commander David D. Porter. Flag-ship : Harriet Lane, Lieutenant J . M. Wainwright. Gun-boat: Owasco, Lieutenant John Guest. Side-wheel steamers (ferry-boats): Clifton, Lieutenant C. H. Baldwin; John P. Jackson, Lieutenant Selim E. Woodworth; Westfield, Commander W. B. Renshaw. Side-wheel steamer (double-ender): Miami, Lieutenant A. D. Harrell. First division of schooners, Lieutenant Watson Smith, commanding: Norfolk Packet, Lieutenant Watson Smith; Oliver H. Lee, Acting Master Washington Godfrey; Para, Acting Master Edward G. Furber; C. P. Williams, Acting Master Amos R. Langthorne; Arletta, Armaments of Union fleet. vessels. 13-in. mortar. 11-in. S. B. 10-in. S. B. 9-in. S. B. 8-in. S. B. 32-pdr. S. B. 100-pdr. R. 80-pdr. R. 50-pdr. R. 3
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
the rush by, so as to recover in some measure the prestige lost through her successful passage of the fleet. Preparations were therefore made for the descent on that very afternoon. Already on the 10th Porter had left his station below Vicksburg with twelve of his mortar-boats, which were to be sent round to the James River. Most of the gun-boats of the mortar-flotilla went with him to tow the schooners down. The force that remained was composed of six mortar-schooners, under Commander W. B. Renshaw, with the ferry-boat Westfield. On the afternoon of the 15th these were moved up into position on the west bank of the river (with the exception of one, the Sidney C. Jones, which had run on shore and was blown up), and by half-past 3 they were engaged with the batteries. Davis, in the river above, also stationed three of his vessels, the Benton, Louisville, and Cincinnati, in position to attack the upper batteries, and to aid in covering Farragut's passage. Toward 7 in the eveni
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.75 (search)
intain the blockade. The third and most important expedition, under Commander W. B. Renshaw, composed of the ferry-boats Westfield and Clifton, the latter under Ler down the bay were the Clifton and Owasco, and two miles away the Westfield, Renshaw's vessel. The enemy had two cotton-clad steamers, the Bayou City and Neptune,attempt at resistance. Hostilities were now suspended awaiting an answer from Renshaw to the demand for a surrender of all the vessels. The Clifton carried this message to the Westfield, and took back Renshaw's refusal, after which she executed her orders, which were to take the vessels out of the harbor. Meantime the enemy hl surrendered the town, and the Westfield, getting aground, was set on fire at Renshaw's order, and blew up prematurely, killing Renshaw and several of his men. Law,Renshaw and several of his men. Law, of the Clifton, now the senior officer, immediately steamed away, and the blockade was raised. (See also pp. 586-7.) On the 8th the blockade was resumed by Comm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.76 (search)
ecruit our crew, diminished to one-half their original number by casualties, and by the expiration of service of those who had volunteered only for the trip to Vicksburg. We had left the Yazoo River with a short supply of fuel, and after our first landing opposite the city-hall we soon dropped down to the coal depot, where we began coaling and repairing, under the fire of the lower fleet, to which, under the circumstances, we could make no reply. Most of the enemy's shot fell short, but Renshaw, in the Westfield, made very fine practice with his 100-pounder rifle gun, occasionally throwing the spray from his shot over our working party, but with the benefit of sprinkling down the coal dust. Getting in our coal, we moved out of range of such sharp practice, where, under less excitement, we hastened such temporary repairs as would enable us to continue the offensive. We had intended trying the lower fleet that evening, but before our repairs could be completed and our crew reenfor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
rs by the Confederates under Magruder. On the 21st of December three companies of the 42d Massachusetts, under Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, were dispatched from New Orleans, without disembarking. Holcomb's 2d Vermont battery was sent with them, but, waiting for its horses to arrive, did not go ashore. Burrell landed at Kuhn's wharf on the 24th, took nominal possession of the town, but really occupied only the wharf itself, protected by barricades and the 32 guns of the fleet under Commander W. B. Renshaw. Major-General J. B. Magruder, who had been barely a month in command of the district of Texas, had directed his attention as soon as he arrived to the defenseless condition of the coast, menaced as it was by the blockading fleet; thus it happened that Burrell's three companies found themselves confronted by two brigades (Scurry's and Sibley's, under Colonel Reily), an artillery regiment, 14 heavy guns, and 14 field-pieces. Magruder had also caused two improvised gun-boats to be eq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
lot Town. I do not hesitate to say, but for the exertions of Commander Renshaw, Lieutenant-Commander Baldwin, and Lieutenant-Commander Wainw cannot be awarded to the commanders of the Westfield and Clifton (Renshaw and Baldwin), for the exertions they displayed on this occasion; tet Lane, Lieutenant-Commander Wainwright, leading; Westfield, Commander Renshaw; Owasco, Lieutenant-Commander Guest; Clifton, Lieutenant-Commommand during this arduous and sometimes unpleasant service. Commander Renshaw, Lieutenant-Commander Guest, Lieutenant-Commander Wainwright,, which they did with effect, until the time came to retire. Commander Renshaw made his rifle gun tell with effect, keeping his vessel in cls on the right bank of the river, supported by the Westfield, Commander Renshaw. The surveyors were landed at the point desired, in the Owas notice of their conduct as this great occasion merits. To Commander Renshaw, Lieutenants-Commanding Guest, Bald win, Wainwright, and Wood
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
t Surgeon. Flag-officer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Division Gulf Blockading Squadron. United States Steam-Sloop Oneida, below Vicksburg, July 16, 1862. Sir — I make the following report of the action with the batteries and with the rebel iron-clad ram Arkansas, last evening, in passing Vicksburg. At 6.40 P. M., flag-ship made general signal 1,218; got under way, steaming as necessary, whilst the fleet was formed according to the plan for the morning of the 28th ultimo. Renshaw's mortars were now firing at the batteries. At 6.55, the army mortars commenced firing; at 7, the Benton opened fire on the new upper battery; at 7.20, passed two of the army gun-boats — now holding their fire to allow us to pass — our fleet having formed and closed up; at 7.30, we opened fire on the new upper battery; fired, in passing, at the upper batteries and rifle-pits with our battery and small arms, whilst under like fire from the rebels. We passed near the left (east) bank, sto<
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
capture of Galveston by the Confederates. destruction of the Westfield. Commander Renshaw and a portion of his crew blown up. the steamer Harriet Lane captured byemployed at the siege of Port Hudson with good effect. On October 6th, Commander Renshaw reported to Rear-Admiral Farragut that with the above named vessels he haorite resorts of blockade runners. It was at once garrisoned by the Army, and Renshaw's vessels took positions in the several entrances of the arbor to prevent the . The Confederates seeing her helpless condition sent a flag of truce to Commander Renshaw, to inform him that if he would surrender his command he would be allowednfederates had posted their steamers and batteries for a renewed attack. Commander Renshaw got all his men into the boats and sent them off, remaining with his own y did, but the flames spread so rapidly that they reached the magazine just as Renshaw entered his boat, and he, with Lieutenant Zimmerman, Chief Engineer Green, and
by the Government of the United States. Fourth. On the signing of these articles by the contracting parties the Forts shall be formally taken possession of by the United States naval forces composing the mortar flotilla, the confederate flag shall be lowered, and the flag of the United States hoisted on the flag-staffs of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. In agreement of the above, we, the undersigned, do hereunto set our hands and seals. David D. Porter, Commanding Mortar Flotilla. W. B. Renshaw, Commander United States Navy. J. M. Wainwright, Lieut. Commanding Harriet Lane. J. K. Duncan, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Coast Defences. Edward Higgins, Lieut.-Col. C. S.A., Commanding Forts Jackson and St. Philip. Witnesses: Ed. T. Nichols, Lieut. Commanding Winona. J. H. Russels, Lieut. Commanding Kanawha. Captain Bailey's report. United States gunboat Cayuga, off New-Orleans, April 25, 1862. Flag-officer: Your boldly conceived and splendidly executed plan of battle having r
bine Pass. He, too, succeeded well. He found at the bar one of the mortar-schooners — Henry James, Acting Master Lewis Pennington, commanding — whom he invited to take part with him, which he did, and, according to Acting Master Crocker's report, performed his duty with great credit, as will be seen by the report herewith enclosed. They took the fort and are still going ahead finely having taken several prizes, one of which arrived here yesterday with despatches. I next sent Commander W. B. Renshaw, with the gunboats Owasco, Harriet Lane, Clifton, and Westfield, to take Galveston, which he did in the shortest time, and without the loss of a man. It appears that the first shot from the Owasco exploded directly over the heads of the men at and around the big gun, (their main reliance,) and the enemy left. A flag of truce was hoisted and the preliminaries arranged for a surrender, which took place on the ninth instant. The reports will give you all the particulars. I have th
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