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33 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 28 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. B. Renshaw or search for W. B. Renshaw in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

bine Pass. He, too, succeeded well. He found at the bar one of the mortar-schooners — Henry James, Acting Master Lewis Pennington, commanding — whom he invited to take part with him, which he did, and, according to Acting Master Crocker's report, performed his duty with great credit, as will be seen by the report herewith enclosed. They took the fort and are still going ahead finely having taken several prizes, one of which arrived here yesterday with despatches. I next sent Commander W. B. Renshaw, with the gunboats Owasco, Harriet Lane, Clifton, and Westfield, to take Galveston, which he did in the shortest time, and without the loss of a man. It appears that the first shot from the Owasco exploded directly over the heads of the men at and around the big gun, (their main reliance,) and the enemy left. A flag of truce was hoisted and the preliminaries arranged for a surrender, which took place on the ninth instant. The reports will give you all the particulars. I have th
ourche country. We have all along heard that General Mouton intended to make a stand at the next point, from each of which he retreated, until he is said to have reached Berwick's Bay. Reports this morning say that this latter point is now evacuated, and the enemy is supposed to have gone in the direction of Vicksburgh. I learn that all along the line of the Opelousas road, the people who have been drafted as conscripts are deserting and coming in, taking the oath of allegiance. A Capt. Renshaw, it is said, who had a company of sixty-two men, lost forty by desertion this morning. Another small squad of eleven men were sworn in as loyal citizens this evening. It is probable that a considerable amount of sugar will find its way to your city, now the railroad is open to this place and beyond; and I have heard of one man already who has received permission to ship his stock, which consists of about three hundred hogsheads. It is likely there will be many more. The Eighth Ne
he Westfield, and tender his proposal to Commander Renshaw. This he did, and went in his own boat.il an answer should have been received. Commander Renshaw refused to accede to the proposition, di to pieces, involving the destruction of Commodore Renshaw, its commander, and a number of officersfollows: The town, attacked and taken by Commodore Renshaw on October tenth, 1862, the rebels flyinield, that vessel came out to meet her, and Com. Renshaw sent an officer and pilot on board, when thart of an hour passes in inaction. Then Commodore Renshaw sends a message and his pilot to the Maron puts off in a gig from that vessel to Commodore Renshaw, with a message received from Gen. Magruthat ensued, consequent on the knowledge of Com. Renshaw's resolution, on board both vessels, was on-minutes all might have been secure, and Commodore Renshaw and those accidentally hurried into eterlast in this world report as follows: Commodore Renshaw stood quietly on the fore part of the ve[4 more...]
both lay, therefore, at the mercy of the Owasco. Herculean efforts were made to extricate them. The Owasco, evidently fearing the Lane's guns, withdrew to a position about a mile distant. It became plainly evident that unless the Bayou City and Harriet Lane could be separated, the enemy could escape if they wished. To gain time, therefore, a flag of truce was taken to the Owasco and Clifton, now lying close together, and a demand for a surrender. Time was asked to communicate with Com. Renshaw, who was on the Westfield. A truce of three hours was agreed upon. Previous to this, the Forty-second Massachusetts regiment, quartered on Kuhn's wharf, were charged. They were protected by barricades, and had taken up the planks from the wharf, rendering it impassable, and our forces withdrew. During the truce with the vessels, the unconditional surrender of these men was demanded and complied with. Their colors consist of a United States flag of silk, and a white flag, having the