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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
s reports were copied, and then in a separate copy made from the book; and the following is the statement of the losses sustained by the wing of the army he commanded, as given at the close of the report: List of killed, wounded and missing.  Officers.Enlisted Men.Aggregate. Killed61755816 Wounded2093,5303,729 Missing3293296    2734,5784,851 Respectfully submitted, (Signed) J. Longstreet Major-General Commanding. Headquarters Right Wing, June 11, 1862. To Major Thomas G. Rhett, A. A. General. You will perceive that he makes the loss in the portion of the troops commanded by him in the battle 1,851 more than you give it in your book. You give the loss in Longstreet's and D. H. Hill's divisions at 3,000; yet General Hill, in his report, which we also have, says: Appended is a list of killed and wounded. From this it appears that of less than 9,000 taken into action nearly 3,000 were struck down. Take Longstreet's statement of his loss and your stateme
the 10th Virginia regiment under Col. Gibbons, Lieut.-Col. Warren, and Major Walker. I cannot speak too highly of the gallantry and good service of my personal staff, Lieutenants Chentney, McDonald, and Contee. They were repeatedly exposed to the enemy's fire in delivering orders, and rendered excellent service in obtaining information of his whereabouts. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Arnold Elzey, Brigadier-General Commanding 4th Brigade. To Major Thomas G. Rhett, Ass't Adj't-Gen. Report of Capt. John D. Imboden, of the Staunton artillery. Manassas Junction, Va., July 22, 1861. Brigadier-General W. H. Whiting, Commanding the Third Brigade of the Army of the Shenandoah: I submit the following summary report of the part taken in the engagement of yesterday, by the battery of the brigade — the Staunton Artillery--under my command. The battery arrived at Camp Walker, below the Junction, at half-past 11 o'clock the night before the ba
tion in relation to the recapture of fugitive slaves, is, by the Constitution, vested exclusively in Congress. In 1850 Congress enacted a Fugitive Slave Act, prepared by Southern Senators and Representatives, so stringent in its provisions that Mr. Rhett, of South Carolina, one of the arch instigators of treason there, expressed doubts of its constitutionality; and that Act is still in force. So far, then, as there is constitutional requirement to provide by legislation for such recapture, it er since I entered political life. I am content with what has been done to-day, and content with what will take place to-morrow. We have carried the body of this Union to its last resting place, and now we will drop the flag over its grave. Mr. Rhett. The secession of South Carolina is not an event of a day. It is not any thing produced by Mr. Lincoln's election, or by the non-execution of the fugitive slave law. It has been a matter which has been gathering head for thirty years; and in th
the smoke, which receded to the northwest. The Confederate cavalry, too, were seen galloping in that direction, perhaps to cut up the flying columns of the Yankees. More than an hour passed on, and nothing of the strife is heard but the roar of ordnance and the rattle of musketry. Suddenly an order comes, borne, I believe, by Gen. McGowan, for the 2d and 8th Palmetto regiments to hasten to the assistance of the left wing. Couriers are despatched to Capt. Perryman, out scouting, and Capt. Rhett, on picket guard, to march across the fields to the left, and join their regiment, the 2d, which is on the march to aid the left wing. This regiment, to which was attached Kemper's battery, followed by the 8th, Col. Cash, hurried to the scene of action. It was met along the way by numbers of the wounded, dying, and retiring, who declared that the day had gone against us; that Sloan's regiment, the 4th, was cut to pieces; that Hampton's Legion, coming to the rescue, and the Louisiana bat
a treaty? It cannot be done; it is impracticable. But, Mr. President, I concur fully with the distinguished Senator from Kentucky in the dislike expressed by him to a change in the form of our Government. He seemed to be apprehensive of a dictatorship. He feared there might be a change in the nature and character of our institutions. I could, if I chose, refer to many proofs to establish the fact that there has been a design to change the nature of our Government. I could refer to Mr. Rhett; I could refer to Mr. Inglis; I could refer to various others to prove this. The Montgomery Daily Advertiser, one of the organs of the so-called Southern Confederacy, says: Has it been a precipitate revolution? It has not. With coolness and deliberation the subject has been thought of for forty years; for ten years it has been the all-absorbing theme in political circles. From Maine to Mexico all the different phases and forms of the question have been presented to the people, un
of coolness, firmness, and careful attention to orders. If our men will do themselves justice, the enemy cannot stand before them. By order of Brig.-Gen. Longstreet. Peyton T. Manning, A. D. C. and A. A. Adj.-Gen. General order--no. 19. Headquarters army of the Potomac, Sept. 13, 1861. The Commanding General has great satisfaction in making known the excellent conduct of Colonel J. E. B. Stuart and of the officers and men of his command in the affair of Lewinsville, on the 11th instant. On this occasion, Colonel Stuart, with Major Terrill's battalion, (Thirteenth Virginia Volunteers,) two field pieces of the Washington artillery, under Captain Rosser and Lieutenant Slocomb, and Captain Patrick's company of cavalry, (First Virginia,) attacked and drove from their position in confusion three regiments of infantry, eight pieces of artillery, and a large body of cavalry, inflicting severe loss — incurring none. By command of General Johnston. Thomas G. Rhett, A. A. General.
North-Carolina were heavily cut up and thrown into confusion, owing to the heavy loss of officers. Gen. Pender's brigade was likewise repulsed from the batteries with severe loss. At this juncture, while the troops were holding this position, Rhett's battery of D. H. Hill's division, succeeded in crossing the broken bridge over the Chickahominy, and took position on the high ground immediately in front of the enemy's batteries, and opened a steady and destructive fire over the heads of our then D. H. Hill on the left of the line, the line extending in the form of a crescent beyond New Cold Harbor, south toward Baker's Mills. At about twelve o'clock M., the batteries of D. H. Hill, consisting of Hardaway's, Carter's, Bondurant's, Rhett's, Peyton's and Clarke's, under command of Majors Pierson and Jones, were massed on our left. Capt. Bondurant advanced to the front, and took position near the powerful batteries of the enemy's artillery. But it was soon found impossible to hol
tic valor, have again earned, as they will receive, the thanks of a grateful country. In making this glorious announcement, on the eve of the memorable struggle about to ensue, the Commanding General does not deem it necessary to invoke the troops of this army to emulate the deeds of their noble comrades in the Valley. He feels already assured of their determined purpose to make illustrious in history the part they are soon to act in the impending drama. By command of Gen. Johnston. Thos. G. Rhett, A. A. General Doc. 103.-exchange of prisoners. Agreement between Generals Dix and Hill. Haxall's Landing, on James River, Va., July 22, 1862. the undersigned having been commissioned by the authorities they respectively represent, to make arrangements for a general exchange of prisoners of war, have agreed to the following articles: article 1. It is hereby agreed and stipulated that all prisoners of war held by either party, including those taken on private armed v
, constituting a portion of this army, and commanded by the former, attacked and routed the Federal forces, under Major-Gen. Banks, successively at Front Royal, Middletown and Winchester, capturing several thousands of prisoners, and an immense quantity of ammunition and stores of all descriptions. The Federal army has been dispersed and ignominiously driven from the Valley of the Shenandoah, and those who have freed the loyal citizens of that district by their patriotic valor, have again earned, as they will receive, the thanks of a grateful country. In making this glorious announcement, on the eve of the memorable struggle about to ensue, the Commanding General does not deem it necessary to invoke the troops of this army to emulate the deeds of their noble comrades in the Valley. He feels already assured of their determined purpose to make illustrious in history the part they are soon to act in the impending drama. By command of Gen. Johnston. Thos. G. Rhett, A. A. General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of seven Pines-report of General James Longstreet. (search)
ur loss invaluable officers and men has been severe. Colonels Giles, Fifth South Carolina; Jones, Twelfth Alabama; Lomax, Third Alabama, fell at the head of their commands, gallantly leading them to victory. Three hundred and forty-seven prisoners, ten pieces of artillery, five thousand small arms, one garrison flag and several regimental standards were taken. A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put at three thousand killed and wounded. The loss on the part of the enemy may be put at a much higher figure, inasmuch as he was driven from his positions, and some half dozen attempts to recover them were successfully repulsed. List of killed, wounded and missing.  Officers.Enlisted Men.Aggregate. Killed,61755816 Wounded,2093,5303,739 Missing,3293296   Total,2734,5784,851 Headquarters Right Wing, June 11th, 1862. Respectfully submitted, (Signed) J. Longstreet, Major-General Commanding. To Major Thomas G. Rhett, Assistant Adjutant-General
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