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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1860., [Electronic resource] 5 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for Rhett or search for Rhett in all documents.

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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
n, which had just been fished up from the wreck of the Keokuk; the sister gun from the same wreck is at--. The garrison consists of 350 enlisted soldiers under Colonel Rhett. They are called Confederate States regulars, and certainly they saluted in a more soldier-like way than the ordinary volunteers. A great proportion of them was a serious attack, and not a reconnoissance. General Ripley spoke with the greatest confidence of being able to repulse any other attack of the same sort. Colonel Rhett, the commandant, entertained us with luncheon in one of the casemates. He is a handsome and agreeable man, besides being a zealous officer. He told me that oumptuous one, for a blockade dinner, as General Ripley called it. The other guests were Gen. Jordan, Chief of the Staff to Beauregard; Gen. Davis, Mr. Nutt, and Col. Rhett, of Fort Sumter. Thelatter told me that if the ironclads had come any closer than they did, he should have dosed them with flat-headed bolts out of the smoothb