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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of Mobile in 1865. (search)
sent away from Mobile to Spanish Fort and Blakely. During the fighting on the eastern shore, the city of Mobile and all the works and forts immediately around it were garrisoned by scarce 3,000 artillerists! And by a bold dash, the place could have been carried any night during the operations against Spanish Fort. Page 48, the author is mistaken in saying we had Parrott guns in Spanish Fort. The only Parrott gun we had at that time about Mobile was a thirty-pounder Parrott, named Lady Richardson. We had captured her at Corinth in October, 1862, my Division Chief of Artillery, Colonel William E. Burnett, brought her off, and added her to our park of field artillery, and we had kept her ever since. Bat we had some cannon better than any Parrott had ever made. They were the Brooke guns, made at Selma in the Confederate, naval works, of the iron from Briarsfield, Alabama--the best iron for making cannon in the world. Our Brooke guns at Mobile were rifles, of 11-inch, 10-inc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the battle of Chickasaw bayou. (search)
check after landing, and in repulsing him when my right flank was threatened; his dispositions were excellent. Colonel Allen Thomas, Twenty-eighth Louisiana, exhibited great gallantry, and with his regiment did splendid service. Colonel Hall, Twenty-sixth Louisiana, showed great coolness and gallantry. Colonel Henderson, Forty-second Georgia; Colonels Black and Turner, Third and Thirtieth Tennessee; Colonel Rowan, Eightieth Tennessee; Colonel Easterling, Forty-sixth Mississippi, and Colonel Richardson, deserve favorable notice. Of the artillery, I would particularly mention Major Holmes. Captain Wofford exhibited great gallantry and coolness, and to him is due more credit than to any one else for such defences as were at Chickasaw bayou, he having planned and executed most of them. Lieutenants Johnson, Duncan, Tarleton and Weims behaved well. Of my personal staff, I am pained to announce the death of Captain Paul Hamilton, Assistant Adjutant-General, who was killed on the 29th by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
comprised the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-Gen-J. A. Walker, consisting of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Nadenbousch, Major Terry, Colonel Funk, Lieutenant-Colonel Shriver and Captain Golliday; J. M. Jones' brigade, consisting of the Twenty-first, Twenty-fifth, Forty-second, Forty-fourth, Forty-eighth and Fiftieth Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Captain W. P. Moseley, Colonel Higginbotham, Captain Richardson, Captain Buckner, Lieutenant-Colonel Dungan and Lieutenant-Colonel Salyer; George H. Steuart's brigade, consisting of Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments, First Maryland battalion and First and Third North Carolina regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Warren, Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, Major Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, Major Parsley and Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert; Nicholls' brigade, Colonel J. M. Williams commanding, consisting of First, Second, Tenth,
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
made his headquarters in their residence, and in it Lee made the surrender of his army. After cannonading for some time without drawing reply, Tyler ordered Richardson's brigade to scour the woods in front, and a squadron of cavalry with two guns to advance on the road to Mitchell's Ford. Two of our guns under Kemper fired upon the cavalry when it came into view. It was quickly withdrawn, and Tyler soon decided to withdraw Richardson also. Meanwhile, this brigade had suddenly become engaged. It had found itself on a low bluff overlooking Bull Run, scarcely 50 yards away, a thin fringe of woods intervening. Just across the creek was Longstreet's bri35073 total282107311356 total3801565131958 Federal. 1st division. Tyler KILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Keyes1950154223 Schenck19151650 Sherman20208253481 Richardsonnotengaged. Total58273423754 2D division. Hunter Porter84148245477 Burnside408861189 Total124236306666 3D division. Heintzelman Franklin71197262
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 4: Yorktown and Williamsburg (search)
mn was under a mile an hour. Our movement was not discovered by the enemy until after daylight on the 4th. His cavalry was at once started in pursuit, and these were followed during the day by five divisions of infantry under Smith, Hooker, Kearney, Couch, and Casey, the whole under command of Sumner. Besides these, Franklin's division was loaded upon transports during the day, and early on the 6th sailed up the York to intercept us near West Point. Two other divisions, Sedgwick's and Richardson's, were also to have been sent by water, and McClellan remained in Yorktown to see them loaded and despatched. But the fighting next day at Williamsburg proved so severe that he rode to the front and had both divisions to follow him. Near Williamsburg, Magruder had, some months before, selected a line of battle across the Peninsula four or five miles long, on which he had at a few places some slight intrenchments with slashings of timber in front, and, about the centre, an enclosed for
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
the war was here overlooked and lost. Soon after five o'clock, Whiting's four rear brigades had straightened out upon the Nine Mile road, with Whiting's own brigade in front near Fair Oaks Station, when a battery opened fire upon the column from its left. It was the battery with four regiments of Couch's division, which had been cut off from Casey's second line and had retreated northward, unpursued, toward the Sumner bridges. Here it had met Sedgwick's division of Sumner's corps and Richardson's division was not far away. Johnston was riding with Whiting when the Federal battery opened fire, but supposing the Chickahominy to be impassable, he thought that there could be no great force there, and Whiting was ordered to charge the position with his brigade. Near the Chickahominy the ground was rolling, and the enemy's guns secured fine positions. For fully 800 yards the Confederate advance was exposed to fire. The reception which it met, however, made it speedily apparent th
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
seize and hold the bridge at the Totopotomoy. The enemy, anticipating us, had torn up the bridge, and held the opposite bank, and obstructed the road, without, however, making any determined stand. Capt. W. W. Blackford, Corps of Engineers, assigned to duty with my command, set about repairing the bridge, and in a half-hour, with the details furnished him, the bridge was ready. Passing Pole Green Church, Gen. Jackson's march led directly toward the crossing of Beaver Dam Creek opposite Richardson's. Reaching that point he bivouacked for the night. Gen. Trimble, in his official report, writes: — On the 26th we moved, with the army, from Ashland in a southerly direction, passing to the east of Mechanicsville in the afternoon, and at 4 P. M. distinctly heard the volleys of artillery and musketry in the engagement of Gen. Hill with the enemy. Before sundown the firing was not more than two miles distant, and, in my opinion, we should have marched to the support of Gen. Hill th
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
ng the crossing of the swamp, and repaired there at once. I found that a terrific cannonade had been opened by the enemy upon the divisions of Gen. Smith and Gen. Richardson and the brigade of Gen. Naglee. The two latter had been placed under my command by the commanding general. The casualties in Richardson's division were quitRichardson's division were quite numerous, but I have received no report of the action from him. In Gen. Smith's division and in Gen. Naglee's brigade the number lost was insignificant. The enemy kept up the firing during the whole day and crossed some infantry below our position, but he made no very serious attempt to cross during the day, and contented him a fifth, Slocum's, was near on the right, each over 8000 strong. Almost the whole of these 40,000 troops took part in the battle. Within an hour's march were Richardson's and Smith's divisions and Naglee's brigade, 23,000 more, which could have been called in if needed. It goes without saying that while the Confederates might
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
, J. K., Taliaferro, Starke6 Hill, D. H.Ripley, Garland, Rodes, Anderson, G. B. Colquitt4 Total 2d Corps4 Divisions19 Brigades, 24 Batteries, 100 Guns24 ArtilleryPendletonPendleton's Reserve, 58 Guns12 CavalryStuartHampton, Lee F., Robertson, 14 Guns3 Aggregate2 Corps, 10 Divisions43 Brigades, 284 guns, 55,000 Men67 CORPSDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTS. 1st CorpsKingPhelps, Doubleday, Patrick, Gibbon4 HookerRickettsDuryea, Christian, Hartsuff2 MeadeSeymour, Magilton, Gallagher4 2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgisNagle, Ferrero2 RodmanFairchild, Harland1 CoxSeammon, Crook3 12 CorpsWilliamsCrawford, Gordon3 Mansfield
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
umner rode with this division. French's and Richardson's divisions followed in echelon to the left pressed, Sumner had sent word to French and Richardson to attack, in order to make a diversion. Frived the united attacks of both French's and Richardson's divisions, and for some time successfully adually brought in the whole of French's and Richardson's divisions, and extended their lines. At ler, exacted severe penalties from French and Richardson. Neither suffered to quite the extent that umner himself had much of his ardor cooled. Richardson lost 1165, and was himself mortally wounded.le, however, under the personal direction of Richardson himself and of Barlow commanding two regimenand materially aided in the result. While Richardson's advance was still being pushed, Pleasantonh Ga. regiments, about 600 men, supported by Richardson's, Eshleman's, and Eubank's batteries. His mmanding Divisions or Brigades were, killed: Richardson, Rodman, Goodrich, and Miles. Among the wou
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