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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), An incident of camp life at Washington. (search)
extreme of frailty. You could not doubt her capacity to undergo the fatigues and hardships of a campaign, but your mind did not suggest to your eye those grosser and more masculine qualities which, whilst girting the woman with strength, disrobe her of the purer, more effeminate traits of body. You saw before you a young girl, apparently about eighteen years of age, with clear, courageous eye, quiverless lip, and soldierly tread — a veritable daughter of the regiment. You have seen Caroline Richings and good old Peter (St. Peter!) march over the stage as the corporal and la fille. Well, this girl, barring the light flaxen hair, would remind you of the latter, drilling a squad of grenadiers. The bridegroom was of the same sanguine, Germanic temperament, as the bride. As he marched, full six feet in height, with long, light-colored beard, high cheek-bones, aquiline nose, piercing, deeply-studded blue eye, broad shoulders, long arms, sturdy legs, feet and hands of a laborious dev
ng the rain on Tuesday night, the attendance at the Theatre was quite large, and included a good many ladies. The bright, particular star of the evening, Miss Caroline Richings, sang several charming songs, and played with her usual vivacity. Mr. Richings performed well, as he always does. Several new pieces are in preparation,Mr. Richings performed well, as he always does. Several new pieces are in preparation, one of which, a pretty domestic sketch entitled the "Household Fairy," will be produced to-night. The play of "Home, Sweet Home," will also be repeated. As recreation is necessary to relieve the human mind of its cares, we know of no place we can more highly recommend for the purpose than the Theatre, while Mr. Richings and hisetch entitled the "Household Fairy," will be produced to-night. The play of "Home, Sweet Home," will also be repeated. As recreation is necessary to relieve the human mind of its cares, we know of no place we can more highly recommend for the purpose than the Theatre, while Mr. Richings and his accomplished daughter are there.
Miss Richings' Benefit. --The accomplished actress who has achieved so many dramatic triumphs in Richmond, appears before the public to-night as a beneficiary, and we expect to see a brilliant audience at the Theatre. The play selected for this occasion is the comedy of "Extremes," which has heretofore been received with marked favor, and which, as it contains some rich scenes from American political life, is now peculiarly appropriate.--Miss Caroline Richings will sing some of her best songs, and her father will play that fine character which is emphatically his own, of Mark Mayberry. The piece is well cast, and will be produced with more than usua of her best songs, and her father will play that fine character which is emphatically his own, of Mark Mayberry. The piece is well cast, and will be produced with more than usual care. We sincerely hope that Miss Richings will have as good a benefit as she deserves; and if this hope is fulfilled, she will have a crowded house.
Theatre. --A most attractive bill is announced for to-night. The performances will commence with a new French play, in which Miss Richings and Mr. Richings both appear. The "Bonny Fish Wife," in which Miss Risings a number of beautiful songs, will also be performed. This play was received with great delight a few nights ago. The allegory of Washington, a beautiful tableau, will conclude the entertainment. A very large and fashionable audience filled the Theatre on Thursday night, and Mr. Richings both appear. The "Bonny Fish Wife," in which Miss Risings a number of beautiful songs, will also be performed. This play was received with great delight a few nights ago. The allegory of Washington, a beautiful tableau, will conclude the entertainment. A very large and fashionable audience filled the Theatre on Thursday night, and everything passed off pleasantly.--We hope the first week of the Richings' engagement will close with a crowded house. More novelties, we are informed, are in preparation for next week.
Theatre. --Miss Richings had a large and fashionable audience at her benefit on Friday night last, and the house was again thronged on Saturday night. The lady was made the recipient of a large number of bouquets on both occasions. We are gratified to perceive that her popularity has in no way diminished. Her beautiful bally love," was received on Saturday night with shouts of applause, and the performances generally passed off well. The splendid allegory, at the close, in which Mr. Richings personates Washington, and his daughter the Goddess of Liberty, introducing the "Star Spangled Banner," brought down a round of hearty cheers, showing that then a round of hearty cheers, showing that the audience felt a sort of patriotic inspiration. The new Indian play of Magnolia, which, we are assured, is full of interest, is to be produced tonight. The pretty sketch of the "Household Fairy," in which Miss Richings and Mr. Howe were much applauded last week, will also be repeated.
A Woman of Genius. --Many years ago, Miss Charlotte Cushman was doing, at the Park Theatre, what in stage parlance is called general utility — the work of three ordinary performers; filling the gap when any one was sick; playing Mr. Richings' parts if he was away; playing Mr. Chippendale's parts if he could not, or would not do so; playing Mrs. Chippendale's parts on occasion,--never refusing to do what was allotted to her. As may be supposed, one who held this position had as yet no position to be proud of. One night, "Guy Mannering," a musical piece, was announced; it was produced for Mr. Braham, the great tenor who played Harry Bertram.--Mrs. Chippendale was cast for Meg Merrilles, but, during the day, was taken ill; so this obscure utility actress, this Miss Cushman, was sent for, and told to be ready in the part by night. She might read it on the boards if she could not commit it. But the "utility woman" was not used to reading her parts; she learned it before nightfall, and
Theatre. --The Enchantress again to-night.--Who that ever saw Miss Richings in her beautiful character of Stella, but wishes to see her again. Her admirable personations last winter were the theme of conversation, and the praises of all were lavished upon the charming actress. Mr. Richings plays Ramir, and plays it well, of course. He plays everything well. We hope the Enchantress will prove equally popular this season, and that her performances may result in a repetition of her former --The Enchantress again to-night.--Who that ever saw Miss Richings in her beautiful character of Stella, but wishes to see her again. Her admirable personations last winter were the theme of conversation, and the praises of all were lavished upon the charming actress. Mr. Richings plays Ramir, and plays it well, of course. He plays everything well. We hope the Enchantress will prove equally popular this season, and that her performances may result in a repetition of her former triumphs.
The Enchantress. --The Theatre was densely crowded on Thursday night, when the Enchantress was produced for the first time this season. The beautiful music and gorgeous scenery brought to our mind the ovations of last winter, when Miss Caroline Richings captivated all by her charms and accomplishments. The members of the company furnished an efficient support to Miss and Mr. Richings, though new in the piece, and we doubt not that it will go off to-night even better than on the occasion Thursday night, when the Enchantress was produced for the first time this season. The beautiful music and gorgeous scenery brought to our mind the ovations of last winter, when Miss Caroline Richings captivated all by her charms and accomplishments. The members of the company furnished an efficient support to Miss and Mr. Richings, though new in the piece, and we doubt not that it will go off to-night even better than on the occasion to which we allude. We anticipate another crowded house.
Vocal concert. --We have been frequently asked if that portion of our citizens who never attend the Theatre are not to have an opportunity this season of hearing the deservedly popular vocalist, Miss Caroline Richings, in some of her favorite songs, but have not been able to answer definitely. When Miss R. was here a year or two since, she gave a concert at Mechanics' Institute Hall, and the house was filled with a fashionable and appreciative audience. If Manager Kunkel can prevail upon her to give a similar entertainment at the same place, before she leaves the city, we have no doubt that she will draw an immense crowd to hear her.
The Enchantress continues to attract fashionable audiences to the Theatre, where Miss Richings is the ruling star. She is deservedly one of the most popular actresses who has appeared on the boards of the Richmond Theatre for a long time, and is highly appreciated by all play-goers.
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